Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTheatre Center
IN THE NEWS

Theatre Center

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | October 6, 2007
Of Mice and Men is about the specific loneliness afflicting the inhabitants of hardscrabble landscapes, the kind that hollows you out and crushes you in the middle like a discarded aluminum can. Different manifestations of this isolation come poignantly to life in an affecting production at Olney Theatre Center. If you go Of Mice and Men runs through Oct. 28 at the Olney Theatre Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Road. Showtimes vary. Tickets are $25-$46. Call 301-924-3400 or go to olneytheatre.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2013
UPDATE: The run has just been extended through Sept. 8. With a fresh story angle and imaginative songs, “A Chorus Line” created one singular sensation on Broadway back in 1975. The musical, which chalked up a slew of Tonys and the Pulitzer Prize, enjoyed a record-breaking 15-year run that would stand uncontested until some singing felines came along. As an energetic, mostly persuasive revival at Olney Theatre Center reconfirms, the slice-of-theater-life scenario of the show still clicks, often affectingly.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 5, 1996
As a holiday treat, Olney Theatre Center is reprising its delightfully imaginative 1994 production of Rodgers and Hammerstein's "Cinderella." The only musical Rodgers and Hammerstein created specifically for television, "Cinderella" imparts an encouraging lesson for both adults and children as the Fairy Godmother encourages the title character to follow her dreams.Olney's revival is directed by Carol Graham Lehan, who choreographed the 1994 version. The cast features Erin Dilly as Cinderella, Terri Mazzarella as the Fairy Godmother and Helen Hedman, repeating the role of the Queen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
Even in our LED age, there is still something deliciously spooky about the sight of gas jets getting fainter, for no apparent reason, inside the glass lamps of a lush Victorian parlor. It's the unforgettable visual motif many a movie fan will always associate with “Gaslight,” the 1944 hit that won Ingrid Bergman an Academy Award as a pitiful wife being slowly driven insane by her husband - mysterious dimming had a lot to do with it. The inspiration for that film, Patrick Hamilton's sturdy little thriller “Angel Street,” doesn't enjoy quite as much fame these days, which makes the play's handsome revival by the Olney Theatre Center all the more welcome.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | July 25, 1999
Moss Hart's "Light Up the Sky" is the first touring production in Olney Theatre Center's history, and this glowing rendition of the 1948 backstage comedy does the Maryland theater proud. Though the play may not be as well-known as Hart's famous collaborations with George S. Kaufman ("You Can't Take It With You," "The Man Who Came to Dinner," etc.), this rollicking chronicle of an out-of-town tryout is a warm-hearted paean to what the playwright once called the "insidious lure" of the theater.
NEWS
August 11, 2006
Stories, puppets -- Transformations Theatre Troupe of Boston (above), a new group of young women recently graduated from Boston University, will present an original musical play, Pearls From Salt, at Olney Theatre Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Road, Olney. The piece, for older children and adults, tells complex folk tales about the lives of young girls, using masks and puppets. Pearls From Salt will be presented on the Root Family Stage at Will's Place (at the Olney Theatre Center) at 6 p.m. today, Thursday and Aug. 18; 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. tomorrow and Aug. 19; and 2 p.m. Sunday and Aug. 20. Admission is free.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | August 24, 2000
"Therese Raquin," a tale of adultery, murder and guilt, opens tomorrow at Olney Theatre Center. Adapted for the stage by Neal Bell from Emile Zola's novel, the play will be presented in Olney's intimate Mulitz-Gudelsky Theatre Lab. Valerie Leonard portrays the title character, a young woman trapped in a dull, loveless marriage. Daryl Lozupone is her sickly husband, Camille; and Christopher Lane plays Camille's friend, with whom Therese has a passionate affair. Directed by Jim Petosa, the production features a scenic design by James Kronzer, built around gilded picture frames in varying states of decay.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | April 22, 1999
Peter Shaffer's "Equus" opens at Olney Theatre Center tomorrow. The 1975 Tony Award-winning drama focuses on a stable boy who blinds six horses and the psychiatrist who examines him.The play shares Olney's spring slot with David Rabe's "A Question of Mercy," which begins performances June 1. Linked by the theme of man's relationship to science, the productions share the same director (Jim Petosa), designers and cast. The set for both, designed by James Kronzer, is intended to represent an abstract laboratory and includes an upper gallery of 18 seats, open to the public on a first-come, first-served basis for $10.Show times for "Equus" at Olney Theatre Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Road, Olney, are 8 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays and 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Sundays, with matinees at 2 p.m. Sundays and some Thursdays and Saturdays.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 25, 1999
James M. Barrie's "Peter Pan" will fly back to the Olney Theatre Center stage for a holiday run, opening tomorrow. First produced at Olney in 1997, this is the non-musical adaptation of Barrie's classic 1904 play about a boy who refuses to grow up.This time around, the title role is being played by Carolyn Pasquantonio, who portrayed Wendy in 1997. Traber Burns plays the dual roles of Mr. Darling and Captain Hook, and Helen Hedman returns to the role of Mrs. Darling. The production is co-directed by Jim Petosa and David Bryan Jackson.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 14, 1995
Rick Cummins and John Scoullar's musical adaptation of Antoine de Saint-Exupery's children's classic, "The Little Prince," has an existential message for adults and playfulness for kids, according to Jim Petosa, director of the current production at Olney Theatre Center. Christopher Rath plays the fallen aviator, and Matthew Mezzacappa plays the mysterious traveler of the title.Show times at Olney Theatre Center, 2001 Route 108, Olney, are 8 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays, 2:30 p.m. and 7:30 Sundays, with additional matinees at 2 p.m. today and 2:30 p.m. Dec. 23 and 30. It runs through Dec. 31. Tickets are $23-$28.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | February 19, 2009
Mark Twain's sadness and worries about money are all right there - hidden under the cross-dressing plot that puts a cigar-chomping gent in hoop skirts and hair bows, beneath the satirical swipes at the French, the art world and Limburger cheese. Is He Dead?, a recently discovered 1898 comedy by the great humorist and adapted by David Ives, has all the sparkle and brilliance of a shooting star. But it leaves behind a trail of dust, stones and space debris. In the farce, currently receiving a solid production at Olney Theatre Center, Twain cheekily placed a beloved, recent painter, Jean Francois Millet, in stage center.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Theater Critic | February 23, 2008
The thought-provoking production of Doubt running at the Olney Theatre Center explores the gory, tragic, frustrating and ultimately futile ramifications of "hunting" for the truth. Sister Aloysius, the principal of a Catholic elementary school in the Bronx in 1964, treats the truth as though it were her prey. She pounces upon it like a cat stalking a mouse. She tracks the truth to its lair, sticks a shotgun in the hole and blasts away. When the answer she seeks is unearthed and laid at her feet, she finds that her own actions have mangled it beyond recognition.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | October 6, 2007
Of Mice and Men is about the specific loneliness afflicting the inhabitants of hardscrabble landscapes, the kind that hollows you out and crushes you in the middle like a discarded aluminum can. Different manifestations of this isolation come poignantly to life in an affecting production at Olney Theatre Center. If you go Of Mice and Men runs through Oct. 28 at the Olney Theatre Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Road. Showtimes vary. Tickets are $25-$46. Call 301-924-3400 or go to olneytheatre.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | February 22, 2007
In the grand tradition of George Bernard Shaw and Henrik Ibsen, W. Somerset Maugham was a proto-feminist playwright. Seeing Olney Theatre Center's gleaming revival of Maugham's The Constant Wife, it's clear that, like Shaw and Ibsen, Maugham believed that if women could attain economic freedom, then all sorts of other freedoms -- sexual, political, etc. -- would follow.
NEWS
August 11, 2006
Stories, puppets -- Transformations Theatre Troupe of Boston (above), a new group of young women recently graduated from Boston University, will present an original musical play, Pearls From Salt, at Olney Theatre Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Road, Olney. The piece, for older children and adults, tells complex folk tales about the lives of young girls, using masks and puppets. Pearls From Salt will be presented on the Root Family Stage at Will's Place (at the Olney Theatre Center) at 6 p.m. today, Thursday and Aug. 18; 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. tomorrow and Aug. 19; and 2 p.m. Sunday and Aug. 20. Admission is free.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2006
INIMITABLE IBSEN The lowdown -- In this centenary year of Henrik Ibsen's death, Olney Theatre Center's Potomac Theatre Festival is presenting two plays by the Norwegian dramatist. First up is Hedda Gabler, now in previews and opening Sunday. Under Halo Wines' direction, Julie-Ann Elliott portrays the title character, the perilously disenchanted new wife of a professor, played by Christopher Lane. Next month, the same actors will again play husband and wife - Dr. and Mrs. Stockmann - in director Jim Petosa's production of An Enemy of the People.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | August 21, 1997
Olney Theatre Center's stylish, engrossing production of Jean Anouilh's "Becket" wraps up its run this weekend. Using Jeremy Sams' 1991 translation, the production vibrantly traces the increasingly troubled relationship between King Henry II and Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury.Under the co-direction of Jim Petosa and Halo Wines, Tony Rizzoli and Paul Morella are especially good at conveying the easygoing, even boyish, camaraderie between the young Henry and Becket, respectively.Showtimes for "Becket" at Olney Theatre Center, 2001 Route 108, Olney, are 8 p.m. today, tomorrow and Saturday, with matinees at 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 1, 1998
There have been several theatrical versions of James M. Barrie's classic "Peter Pan" lately. London's Royal National Theatre has a large-scale, four-hour extravaganza narrated by Alec McCowen and starring Ian McKellen as Captain Hook. And in Los Angeles, an avant-garde, Obie Award-winning adaptation called "Peter and Wendy" interprets the bond between that pair as a reflection of Barrie's relationship with his mother, whose grief over the accidental death of James' older brother led James to fill in as the "lost boy" in her affections.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUN STAFF | July 10, 2003
Olney Theatre Center's fifth annual Potomac Theatre Festival opens Wednesday with Neal Bell's Monster, adapted from Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. Updating some of the language, but not the 19th century setting, Bell's play focuses on the issue of personal accountability. An Obie Award winner and playwright-in-residence at the Yale School of Drama, Bell also scripted the adaptation of Emile Zola's Therese Raquin that was produced at Olney three summers ago. Monster stars Christopher Lane as the title character, Jeffries Thaiss as Victor Frankenstein and Valerie Leonard in the dual roles of Frankenstein's mother and a servant.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.