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By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
With its spring production of Disney's "The Little Mermaid Jr.," the Children's Theatre of Annapolis has found an ideal vehicle to reach its goal of presenting shows highlighting young performers' talents. This shortened version of the 2008 Broadway stage play, adapted from Disney's 1989 animated blockbuster, makes full use of its 40-player cast, whose ages range from 8 to 14. The show debuts Friday as part of Children's Theatre's 53rd year. Veteran director Jerry Vess, who has led seven Annapolis Summer Garden productions, marks his fifth directorial assignment for Children's Theatre with "Mermaid," having also directed "Aladdin," "Wizard of Oz," "The Emperor's New Clothes" and last season's "Alice in Wonderland.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Tim Smith and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
It is impossible to avoid thinking about Sarah Kane's suicide by hanging in 1999 at the age of 28 when encountering the British playwright's final work, "4.48 Psychosis. " There's something at once real and surreal, disturbing and absorbing, about this roughly hour-long examination of mental illness, qualities that Iron Crow Theatre seizes upon in a darkly evocative production directed by Ryan Clark at Theatre Project. Kane's non-linear play is a kind of manic prose poem about people in various stages of mental illness; warnings and pleas seem to haunt every line.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 1, 1998
The latest addition to the Baltimore theater scene is an aptly named new company called More Theatre. Under the leadership of artistic director Aimee Blankenship and managing director Jennifer Roberts, More Theatre opens its debut production, "Leonardo's Last Supper," tonight at St. John's Church in Charles Village.Written by British playwright and screenwriter Peter Barnes ("The Ruling Class" and "Enchanted April"), "Leonardo's Last Supper" is a dark comedy about a corrupt 16th-century undertaker and his family, who have fallen on hard times due to the end of the plague.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
Baltimore's continually blossoming theater scene has another bud. Cohesion Theatre Company , to be based in the Highlandtown Arts and Culture District, will debut in November with a production of Shakespeare's "Coriolanus. " (Given the arrival of Chesapeake Shakespeare Company, the Bard appears to be on a roll this season in Baltimore.) The Cohesion ensemble also plans to stage two Baltimore premieres: Tom Horan's "Thirteen Dead Husbands" in March, Anna Moench's "The Pillow Book" next summer.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | February 24, 1995
Four months after opening the doors of its first permanent facility, Everyman Theatre is struggling to keep those doors open.In a letter being sent today to 5,000 Everyman supporters and past audience members, producing director Vincent Lancisi has asked for help in overcoming a short-term deficit. "We're in need of thousands, not hundreds of thousands," he said yesterday.The next production in the theater's four-play season was to have been "The Belle of Amherst," a one-woman show about poet Emily Dickinson, originally scheduled to play a three-week run in March.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1997
The Howard County Historic District Commission has approved Sun and John Pacylowski's application for a new sign to replace the prominent marquee that had for so many years announced the musicians and artists performing at the Ellicott Theatre in historic Ellicott City. The theater, on Main Street at Old Columbia Pike, closed last month.John Pacylowski said the new sign is the first of several changes at the theater, which is next-door to a collectibles shop, called Precious Gifts, that he and his wife own.He said the 55-year-old building will undergo a two-phase renovation.
NEWS
By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,Contributing Writer | January 28, 1994
With Valentine's Day less than three weeks away, Howard Community College's infant Rep Stage Company will not perform your typical champagne, chocolates and violins romance tonight."
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 3, 1998
Though Gary Yealdhall as Seymour and Lauran Taylor as Audrey are effective singers and convincing players in the Pasadena Theatre Company's production of "Little Shop of Horrors," both were upstaged by the man-prop that is Audrey II.The voracious carnivorous plant that keeps growing is given life, character and a large baritone voice by Phil Greenfield. Cajoling, then demanding to have his insatiable appetite appeased, Greenfield gleefully grows menacing as his voice expands with the plant's burgeoning bulk.
NEWS
September 11, 1995
Imagine the thrill of being invited to the famous Apollo Theatre in New York City. And then to go with a bus load of hopeful entertainers, friends and family to stand on the stage and perform.For 12-year-old Blake and 11-year-old Brandon Brown of Westminster this was a dream come true. On Wednesday, the brothers traveled to New York with their mom, Paula Cook, and a small group of friends and family on a bus sponsored by Kemet Productions."It felt good to just stand on the stage at the Apollo," said Blake.
NEWS
By Jessica Fitzgerald and Jessica Fitzgerald,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 7, 2000
Theatre on the Hill performer D. Scott Richards remembered his starving-actor days during and after college as he heated up a rice dish in a microwave oven. "There was a point where I was just thinking, `What do I want for dinner tonight -- the blue Ramen or the brown Ramen?' " said Richards, a recent graduate of Catholic University in Washington. Now Richards eats when he can, usually between rehearsals for Theatre on the Hill, an 18-year-old company of actors that brings summer productions to Alumni Hall at Western Maryland College in Westminster.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Think back, way back, to a time when you wanted to communicate with someone you would like to get to know better. You look up his or her address in a thick book of thin, white pages (delivered once a year to your doorstep by the sole phone company). Having found the address, you pick up a piece of paper - stay with me now - and a pen. You write a greeting to the person who has caught your attention. You place said greeting in an envelope you seal and affix a stamp to, before placing in a mailbox down the street.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Binnie Ritchie Holum, a dancer, choreographer, playwright and actress who had been a co-founder of the Baltimore Women's Theatre Project , died Sept. 21 at her parents' home near Saranac Lake, N.Y., of a gioblastoma, an aggressive brain tumor. She was 64. "Her talent was just endless and she had more energy than three people combined," said Harvey M. Doster, her collaborator, who is director of the International Baccalaureate Theater Program at St. Timothy's School in Stevenson.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
A two-alarm blaze at an adjacent building caused damage to the historic Mayfair Theatre in downtown Baltimore and shut down light rail operations Wednesday afternoon. The fire was reported at about 12:20 p.m. in the rear of a vacant building in the 300 block of W. Franklin St., and fire department spokesman Ian Brennan said that the neighboring theater suffered external damage. "The extent of the internal damage is not known as far as the Mayfair building itself," Brennan said.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
At Bay Theatre's Wine and Words production of "Four Weddings and an Elvis," a staged reading by Bay's brilliant team of actors on Sept. 8, the capacity audience discovered that life sometimes imitates art. The "Four Weddings" became five, with the fifth a real-life wedding ceremony in which Bay's co-founder and artistic director, Janet Luby, married longtime love Stephen Strawn in a ceremony on stage. The nuptials came with much applause and best wishes from at least 250 audience and family members in attendance, turning the show into a true wedding party.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
  Poor Harry. The struggling actor lucked out auditioning for an understudy gig, but he has little respect for the guy he's understudying -- Jake, a so-so star of low-grade disaster movies. To make things more uncomfortable, the stage manager running the rehearsal turns out to be Harry's former fiancee, Roxanne, and she is far from pleased at the reunion. Still, Harry is determined to plunge into the play, a long-buried work by Franz Kafka filled with challenging existential musings and surreal situations.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Neil Simon's "Brighton Beach Memoirs" opens the 55th season for Prince George's Little Theatre, and the production at Bowie Playhouse qualifies as the troupe's strongest start in recent memory. This is inspired theater by every measure, starting with the choice of the largely autobiographical 1968 work by Simon, which traces his adolescent years, to begin what became known as his Eugene Trilogy. Perhaps because of frequent stagings of "The Odd Couple" and other favorites at regional theaters, Simon is sometimes dismissed as a master of the one-liner but lacking in substance.
ENTERTAINMENT
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 19, 2003
A little more than two decades ago in Westminster, three professors at what was then called Western Maryland College decided to start a summer theater in residence. They didn't come up with this idea until May, so they had very little time to turn their vision into reality. But not only did they pull it off, the theater they founded is still going strong. "Our goal was to try to put a new spin on a Broadway musical. The first year we did Man of La Mancha and Godspell, and even though we had no right to succeed, it was wildly successful," says Ira Domser, the only one of the founding three still involved with Theatre on the Hill.
NEWS
May 3, 1998
Theatre on the Hill, a professional summer theatre company in residence at Western Maryland College, has announced its 1998 season, which begins with "The Sound of Music," one of the best-loved musicals of all time.The schedule for the company's 17th season also includes "The House of Blue Leaves," "Gypsy" and "Aladdin." Most of the performances are scheduled for weekends, but there will be Thursday night performances in July and August.Also, there will be a pre-opening night benefit performance for each major production.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | September 4, 2014
Work has begun on the major mixed-use development downtown that is to replace the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre with two glassy apartment towers and four floors of shopping, said a spokesman for Owings Mills developer David S. Brown Enterprises LTD . The garage beneath the theater closed this month and a construction fence now surrounds the property, located at the intersection of Charles and Baltimore streets. Formal demolition could start "any day," said Larry Lichtenauer of Lawrence Howard & Associates.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Ballet Theatre of Maryland artistic director of Dianna Cuatto has a lot to celebrate with the start of the company's 36th season in October. Actually, the celebrating begins Sept. 28 with the ribbon cutting and grand reopening of the theater at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, an event marking the first phase of a multiyear renovation project. The reopening will bring together the hall's four resident companies - Ballet Theatre of Maryland, Annapolis Chorale, Annapolis Opera and Annapolis Symphony Orchestra - all stepping on stage to show off the improvements, including new seating in the main theater and a stage extension.
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