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NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | January 12, 1993
A Govans construction company has filed court papers to foreclose on the historic Senator Theater, but one of the theater owners says cinema buffs need not worry about the future of the city's last remaining art deco movie palace."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
The owner of Middle River's Bengies Drive-In Theatre is appealing a judge's decision to set aside a jury award of $838,000 in a case involving lights from a nearby Royal Farms store. An attorney for Bengies owner D. Edward Vogel said the appeal of Baltimore Circuit Judge Robert Cahill's ruling was filed this week. In his Sept. 13 order, Cahill dismissed a jury's finding that light from the Royal Farms store interfered with operation of the 56-year-old Bengies. In his opinion, Cahill said Vogel and his attorneys did not provide enough evidence to back up such a claim.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1999
The Force will be with us for at least another six weeks, and exhibitors can live with that.Thanks to George Lucas and 20th Century Fox's insistence that theater owners show "Star Wars: Episode One -- The Phantom Menace" for at least 12 weeks, the summer's big blockbuster is still only halfway through its contractually mandated run.And while the box-office returns haven't been enough to make the film the unprecedented blockbuster some had predicted, there's...
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV and Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2012
Tom Kiefaber, former owner of the Senator Theatre , was released from jail Tuesday and gave his own account of events leading to his arrest Monday at the cinema, denying that he has trespassed and harassed the current owners. Kiefaber had been charged Monday with trespassing and taken to Central Booking downtown. Later that day, a Baltimore district judge issued a temporary peace order prohibiting Kiefaber from contacting Kathleen Cusack, who operates the Senator along with her father, James "Buzz" Cusack.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2002
A flock of blockbuster original movies and sequels this year -- from Spider-Man to Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets -- has the movie industry breaking box office records for the second straight year. Helped by a record November, the movie industry already has surpassed its entire 2001 box office take with sales of $8.21 billion, according to Nielsen EDI Inc., which tracks the movie industry from Hollywood, Calif. For all of 2002, sales are expected to exceed last year's $8.13 billion by 9 percent to 12 percent.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1999
President Clinton and a major industry group representing movie theater owners agreed yesterday to require age checks of teen-agers trying to get into R-rated films.Critics of the entertainment industry have long called for tighter controls on access to violent entertainment by children. Those calls have become increasingly strident since the April 20 massacre at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo., in which two students with an apparent fascination with guns and violent video games killed 13 people before taking their own lives.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | March 6, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- "And now a word from our sponsors. . . ."If Delegate Paul G. Pinsky, D-Prince George's, has his way, moviegoers may be spared the questionable pleasure of hearing those words within the sanctuary of the cinema.Mr. Pinsky's bill, debated before the House Economic Matters Committee yesterday, would make Maryland the first state to "draw a line in the sand," as Mr. Pinsky put it, beyond which advertisers may not tread.The bill would prohibit commercial advertising in movie theaters, unless the advertised product is being sold at the refreshment counter.
FEATURES
By SHARON WAXMAN and SHARON WAXMAN,THE NEW YORK TIMES | December 19, 2005
SANTA MONICA, Calif. -- With evidence increasing that the American moviegoing habit is in decline, theater owners are undertaking a concerted campaign to bring it back. The National Association of Theater Owners, the primary trade group for exhibitors, is pushing to improve the theatrical experience by addressing complaints about on-screen advertisements, cell phones in theaters and other disruptions, while planning a public relations campaign to promote going out to the movies. Some exhibitors are hiring more ushers to ride herd on inconsiderate patrons and are thinking about banning children after a certain hour, to cut down on crying babies in the theater, said John Fithian, president of the trade group.
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | April 4, 1993
At 15, Bob Weinholt lied about his age to get his first job in a movie theater as an usher. He never left the theater business, working his way up to manage concession stands, run the projector, manage a theater, then head a district full of theaters.Today, the Bel Air 40-year-old is one of the biggest independent movie theater owners in Maryland, with nine theaters, 44 screens and 150 employees."Movies," said Mr. Weinholt, "are here to stay. They have survived two world wars, a Great Depression and the advent of television.
FEATURES
By Glenn Lovell and Glenn Lovell,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 11, 2005
Nicole Kidman pushes Chanel No. 5. Val Kilmer points a Coolpix 2000 digital camera. Robert De Niro, wandering the mean streets of his New York, rhapsodizes over American Express. Not quite Oscar-worthy roles, but they've all made it to the big screen. Commercials, once considered a rude interruption, have emerged as a multimillion-dollar cash cow for theater chains across the nation. Though many viewers find the ads annoying, it's Hollywood's younger ticket buyers, ages 14 to 34, who are generating the demand to produce more such spots.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2012
On a typical weekend night in the summer, the line of cars waiting to enter the Bengies Drive-In Theatre backs onto Eastern Boulevard, patrons hit up the snack bar and, as dusk turns to dark, owner D. Edward Vogel reels off the theater's many rules before starting the evening's first feature. But the outcome of a trial this week could put the Baltimore area's last drive-in movie theater at risk. A lawsuit pitting Bengies against a neighboring Royal Farms convenience store and its outdoor lights is being argued before a Baltimore County Circuit Court jury this week.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2011
As the saying goes: I went to a fight and a hockey game broke out. We may have to start wearing face masks to City Council meetings. You might have seen this week that Tom Kiefaber, the combative former owner of the Senator movie theater, announced he planned to run for City Council president. It was quite a delightful announcement, actually, evoking everything from "Star Wars" to toilet bowls, not the usual pallid fare you tend to get whether someone is running for student council or the presidency.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | March 11, 2011
A legal document filed at the city courthouse a few weeks ago and a hearing held this week sought to settle the estate of Clarisse Mechanic, the theater owner who also headed a philanthropic foundation. I also counted her as a family friend, a Baltimore character who, despite her personal wealth, did her own grocery shopping and rode public buses. The petition asked that her 37 distant cousins, most of whom she never knew or met, share in her estate. She refused to make a will, one that would direct where her estate, valued at a little under $3 million, would go. For some time before her death in 2009, her friends and acquaintances tried to persuade her to set out where the estate would go. She was approached on one occasion to leave funds to have a theater in the Baltimore School for the Arts bear the Mechanic name.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2010
Baltimore's spending board gave a father-and-daughter team final approval Wednesday to run the historic Senator Theatre . Charles "Buzz" Cusack and Kathleen Cusack will pay the city $1 annual rent for 40 years and receive a $700,000 loan from the city to renovate the 71-year-old movie theater under the terms of the deal approved by the Board of Estimates. The pair will front $400,000 for the improvements, which include the construction of two restaurants and a second movie screen, and seek $550,000 in federal and state grants and historical tax credits.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | July 26, 2009
It's an elegant little word that ends any number of dramas, from Othello to the Merchant of Venice to - who knows - maybe even High School Musical. Exeunt. The common stage direction, the actors' cue to exit a scene, is Latin for, "They go out." In real life, though, exits tend not to be so simple. Lights don't fade to black, curtains don't fall with finality, the dramatis personae may go rogue and simply refuse to exit, stage left or right. So it went on Wednesday, when the long-running drama of Baltimore's Senator Theatre headed not necessarily toward its final conclusion, but at least the end of one act. Having teetered on the brink of closure for years as a result its owner's mounting debt, the Senator was going to auction.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 3, 2006
A feature in which Sun writers and critics sound off about the movies. Going to the movies can be a drag, regardless of the quality of the film. Bad enough that ticket prices keep going up and concession prices tend toward the absurd ($3 for a cup of popcorn?). Worse is what happens when you sit in your seat, and then have to put up with the guy behind you who keeps trying to impress his girlfriend with his knowledge of the movies, or the gal in front chatting on a cell phone, or the couple to the side who can't keep their opinions to themselves, or the two dudes one row back who seem on the verge of fisticuffs.
FEATURES
By Lorenza Munoz and Lorenza Munoz,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 7, 2003
LAS VEGAS - The price of making a movie soared substantially last year, with the average major studio production costing nearly $59 million, a 23 percent increase from 2001, the Motion Picture Association of America announced this week. It was the biggest percentage increase since 1997 and a little more than double the $29 million of 10 years ago. In his address to theater owners at the annual ShoWest convention, MPAA president Jack Valenti lamented the skyrocketing costs of making movies and attributed the increase to the special effects and high technology now used throughout the filmmaking process in many movies.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 3, 2006
A feature in which Sun writers and critics sound off about the movies. Going to the movies can be a drag, regardless of the quality of the film. Bad enough that ticket prices keep going up and concession prices tend toward the absurd ($3 for a cup of popcorn?). Worse is what happens when you sit in your seat, and then have to put up with the guy behind you who keeps trying to impress his girlfriend with his knowledge of the movies, or the gal in front chatting on a cell phone, or the couple to the side who can't keep their opinions to themselves, or the two dudes one row back who seem on the verge of fisticuffs.
FEATURES
By SHARON WAXMAN and SHARON WAXMAN,THE NEW YORK TIMES | December 19, 2005
SANTA MONICA, Calif. -- With evidence increasing that the American moviegoing habit is in decline, theater owners are undertaking a concerted campaign to bring it back. The National Association of Theater Owners, the primary trade group for exhibitors, is pushing to improve the theatrical experience by addressing complaints about on-screen advertisements, cell phones in theaters and other disruptions, while planning a public relations campaign to promote going out to the movies. Some exhibitors are hiring more ushers to ride herd on inconsiderate patrons and are thinking about banning children after a certain hour, to cut down on crying babies in the theater, said John Fithian, president of the trade group.
FEATURES
By Glenn Lovell and Glenn Lovell,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 11, 2005
Nicole Kidman pushes Chanel No. 5. Val Kilmer points a Coolpix 2000 digital camera. Robert De Niro, wandering the mean streets of his New York, rhapsodizes over American Express. Not quite Oscar-worthy roles, but they've all made it to the big screen. Commercials, once considered a rude interruption, have emerged as a multimillion-dollar cash cow for theater chains across the nation. Though many viewers find the ads annoying, it's Hollywood's younger ticket buyers, ages 14 to 34, who are generating the demand to produce more such spots.
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