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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 3, 1999
What do 40,000 pounds of birdseed have in common with America's war on drugs?Nothing, says Jean Laprise, an Ontario, Canada, farmer who shipped the birdseed to his U.S. customers only to have it seized when it crossed the U.S.-Canadian border.Everything, says the U.S. government.The nearly 20 tons of birdseed have been locked in a Detroit warehouse since Aug. 9, when the birdseed was impounded by the U.S. Customs Service. The reason: The seed consists of sterilized seeds processed from industrial hemp.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
A Baltimore County councilwoman is seeking to tighten a local ban on synthetic marijuana, saying manufacturers have found ways around a state ban enacted last year as well as federal and county laws. Councilwoman Vicki Almond said existing laws against synthetic marijuana, often called K2 or Spice, only prohibit certain chemical compounds - and manufacturers can tweak formulas to make them legal. "These chemicals - they just change them so often that there's no way to keep up with naming the chemicals that are involved in this stuff," said Almond, who introduced the county legislation.
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NEWS
March 16, 2012
I've read a pair of forceful screeds against medical marijuana in The Sun's editorial section lately ("Medical marijuana laws make a farce of medicine," March 7; "Who says marijuana is safe and effective?" March 13). Both make the rather uncontroversial argument that doctors, not lawmakers, should be determining medical policy. They overlook one simple fact though - the lawmaker leading the fight for medical marijuana in Maryland is a doctor, Del. Dan Morhaim. In fact, Dr. Morhaim is the only licensed medical doctor in the General Assembly.
NEWS
March 16, 2012
I've read a pair of forceful screeds against medical marijuana in The Sun's editorial section lately ("Medical marijuana laws make a farce of medicine," March 7; "Who says marijuana is safe and effective?" March 13). Both make the rather uncontroversial argument that doctors, not lawmakers, should be determining medical policy. They overlook one simple fact though - the lawmaker leading the fight for medical marijuana in Maryland is a doctor, Del. Dan Morhaim. In fact, Dr. Morhaim is the only licensed medical doctor in the General Assembly.
NEWS
March 13, 2012
Since the legislature wants to play doctor, a little medical education is required before it can obtain and then defend a DEA license like I have. In their excellent opinion Friday ("Medical marijuana laws make a farce of medicine," March 7), Drs. Dinah Miller and Antoinette Hansen did not mention that only double blind, randomized controlled trials with hundreds of patients can determine the safety and effectiveness of a medicine. For marijuana, this would have to be vaporized, as any smoke is carcinogenic, and in treatment-naive subjects, since habitual users can figure quality with a single hit. Paul Armentano of NORML asks us to respect pot because of its long history ("FDA'smarijuana Catch-22," March 11)
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2002
There's a guy you have to know to get the stuff. Isn't there always? You know a little something about him and vice versa, so everything's cool. In hours the feds will put down the hammer and then things will really get tense. This should be easy. A phone call, a short drive, and you make the hemp connection. No time to waste. You drive into a wind-whipped parking lot, slipping into the dim, greasy lamp light, going through the steps again. No surprises pal, not tonight. Save it for your birthday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 29, 2006
Most of the time, police aren't surprised when they find a ballpoint pen crammed with cocaine, or illicit pills stashed in a secret compartment of a running shoe. But when a bag full of smiley-faced gumballs hollowed out and stuffed like mushrooms with marijuana were confiscated early this year at a Howard County high school and last week in Northern Virginia, it took authorities by surprise. "This is very unique," said Edward Marcinko, special agent and public information officer for the Baltimore District Office of the Drug Enforcement Administration.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | July 11, 1995
For thousands of years, healers have used a single herb to treat a wide variety of symptoms. It has been tried against colds, hemorrhoids and dandruff as well as more serious conditions such as asthma, inflammation and loss of appetite.Until the early 20th century, American physicians often prescribed it as a pain reliever, muscle relaxant and treatment for migraine. But in 1937 the Marihuana Tax Act was passed to keep people from abusing this herb. The consequence was to make it nearly impossible to use it for legitimate medical purposes.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | May 24, 2002
WASHINGTON - Our nation's drug czar is annoyed. If proponents have their way, the District of Columbia will vote later this year to legalize marijuana for medicinal purposes for the second time. John P. Walters, director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, took some pot shots at the issue in a recent Washington Post piece that has been reprinted across the country. Unfortunately, he brings more smoke than light. "After years of giggling at quaintly outdated marijuana scare stories like the 1936 movie Reefer Madness," he writes, "we've become almost conditioned to think that any warning about the true dangers of marijuana are overblown."
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2014
A Baltimore County councilwoman is seeking to tighten a local ban on synthetic marijuana, saying manufacturers have found ways around a state ban enacted last year as well as federal and county laws. Councilwoman Vicki Almond said existing laws against synthetic marijuana, often called K2 or Spice, only prohibit certain chemical compounds - and manufacturers can tweak formulas to make them legal. "These chemicals - they just change them so often that there's no way to keep up with naming the chemicals that are involved in this stuff," said Almond, who introduced the county legislation.
NEWS
March 13, 2012
Since the legislature wants to play doctor, a little medical education is required before it can obtain and then defend a DEA license like I have. In their excellent opinion Friday ("Medical marijuana laws make a farce of medicine," March 7), Drs. Dinah Miller and Antoinette Hansen did not mention that only double blind, randomized controlled trials with hundreds of patients can determine the safety and effectiveness of a medicine. For marijuana, this would have to be vaporized, as any smoke is carcinogenic, and in treatment-naive subjects, since habitual users can figure quality with a single hit. Paul Armentano of NORML asks us to respect pot because of its long history ("FDA'smarijuana Catch-22," March 11)
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 29, 2006
Most of the time, police aren't surprised when they find a ballpoint pen crammed with cocaine, or illicit pills stashed in a secret compartment of a running shoe. But when a bag full of smiley-faced gumballs hollowed out and stuffed like mushrooms with marijuana were confiscated early this year at a Howard County high school and last week in Northern Virginia, it took authorities by surprise. "This is very unique," said Edward Marcinko, special agent and public information officer for the Baltimore District Office of the Drug Enforcement Administration.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | May 24, 2002
WASHINGTON - Our nation's drug czar is annoyed. If proponents have their way, the District of Columbia will vote later this year to legalize marijuana for medicinal purposes for the second time. John P. Walters, director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, took some pot shots at the issue in a recent Washington Post piece that has been reprinted across the country. Unfortunately, he brings more smoke than light. "After years of giggling at quaintly outdated marijuana scare stories like the 1936 movie Reefer Madness," he writes, "we've become almost conditioned to think that any warning about the true dangers of marijuana are overblown."
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2002
There's a guy you have to know to get the stuff. Isn't there always? You know a little something about him and vice versa, so everything's cool. In hours the feds will put down the hammer and then things will really get tense. This should be easy. A phone call, a short drive, and you make the hemp connection. No time to waste. You drive into a wind-whipped parking lot, slipping into the dim, greasy lamp light, going through the steps again. No surprises pal, not tonight. Save it for your birthday.
BUSINESS
November 14, 1999
If you want to know if Mount Airy is growing, just go to church.On one Sunday in September, The Rev. Arthur Lillicropp said he welcomed 22 new people to his parish, St. James Episcopal Church on Main Street.Lillicropp also tells about the four baptisms he presided over on that September day and the five that he did the following Sunday.St. James is a good indicators of what's happening in Mount Airy. Of those 22 new church members who have moved to this little town at the junction of Carroll, Frederick, Howard and Montgomery counties, some were from out of state, but most came from the Baltimore-Washington corridor, according to Lillicropp.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 3, 1999
What do 40,000 pounds of birdseed have in common with America's war on drugs?Nothing, says Jean Laprise, an Ontario, Canada, farmer who shipped the birdseed to his U.S. customers only to have it seized when it crossed the U.S.-Canadian border.Everything, says the U.S. government.The nearly 20 tons of birdseed have been locked in a Detroit warehouse since Aug. 9, when the birdseed was impounded by the U.S. Customs Service. The reason: The seed consists of sterilized seeds processed from industrial hemp.
NEWS
May 25, 1991
Salisbury State UniversityTime: 10 a.m.Date: todayGraduates: 770Speaker: Judge Shirley Brannock Jones, retired, U.S. Court of Appeals, 4thDistrictCollege of Notre Dameof MarylandTime: 10:30 a.m.Date: todayGraduates: 365Speaker: Margaret M. Heckler, former secretary of health and human servicesUniversity of Baltimore Schoolof LawTime: 2 p.m.Date: tomorrowGraduates: 281Speaker: J. Joseph Curran Jr., attorney general for MarylandTowson State UniversityTime: 1...
NEWS
January 31, 1992
Garrett County Circuit Judge Frederick A. Thayer today said the murder conviction of John Frederick Thanos will stand but Thanos is entitled to a new sentencing hearing.The judge declared a mistrial yesterday after questions were raised about whether a prosecutor improperly talked to a witness during a lunch recess.Speaking from the bench, the judge today also said that he found no misconduct on the part of the state's attorney, Sue A. Schenning. See earlier story, B1.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | July 11, 1995
For thousands of years, healers have used a single herb to treat a wide variety of symptoms. It has been tried against colds, hemorrhoids and dandruff as well as more serious conditions such as asthma, inflammation and loss of appetite.Until the early 20th century, American physicians often prescribed it as a pain reliever, muscle relaxant and treatment for migraine. But in 1937 the Marihuana Tax Act was passed to keep people from abusing this herb. The consequence was to make it nearly impossible to use it for legitimate medical purposes.
FEATURES
February 25, 1992
A memorial service for conductor Andrew Schenck, originally scheduled for 2 p.m. Saturday, has been rescheduled by his family for 4 p.m. that day at the Church of Redeemer, 5603 N. Charles St.An annual scholarship in his name has been established at Tanglewood, the summer home and school of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Contributions may be sent to the Andrew Schenck Memorial Fund in care of Robin Yorks, Boston Symphony, Symphony Hall, Boston, Mass. 02115.
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