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Thanksgiving Dinner

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NEWS
November 22, 2009
Laurel First Assembly of God will host its annual Thanksgiving "Feed the Hungry" event at 7 p.m. Wednesday at 1102 Montgomery St. A traditional turkey dinner will be served to those needing a meal. There will be door prizes. Transportation will be provided. Information, call 301-490-0100.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Susan Reimer | November 28, 2012
I woke Thanksgiving morning to text messages from my sisters. Happy Thanksgiving, they said. My daughter sent a text saying she was jumping in the shower and would be leaving shortly to help me cook. I texted pictures of my dining room table, set with flowers and linens for Thanksgiving dinner. After dinner, I texted pictures of all the dirty dishes. My sister texted a picture of her Christmas tree, and her kids all texted her to say it looked great. I know, because I was copied in on the texting.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Emily Testerman and Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2009
Avoid the stress, the mess, the "I don't know what happened, I followed the recipe!" dilemma and the cleanup, but still get your turkey fix at these Baltimore restaurants open on Thanksgiving Day. Alizee We're curious to find out what the chefs have in store for their buffet, served 3 p.m.-7 p.m. Usual fare is a mix of contemporary Asian and French cuisine, so the possibilities have our heads spinning. If you go: Alizee is at 4 W. University Parkway. Call 410-235-8200.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
Superstorm Sandy has left the small town of Crisfield reeling from floods that destroyed homes and power outages that persist three weeks after the deluge. But the storm hasn't dampened the community spirit in this Eastern Shore enclave. Scores of residents expect to come together on Thanksgiving for a community dinner at the Elks Lodge, which is serving turkey and all the traditional side dishes — the majority of the meal donated. In preparation, a sign on Highway 413 reads: "Come one, come all. Dinner at 3 p.m. " "We are opening the doors to everybody and will do the best we can to serve them," said John Mackenzie, who calls himself the lodge's "official poobah.
EXPLORE
January 8, 2012
Thanksgiving Day 2011 dawned bright and beautiful as over 60 volunteers made their way to help serve the Loverde Family Community Fund's Thanksgiving Day feast for the homeless. Around 1 p.m., the first of 160 guests from the Westside Homeless Shelter, Mosaic Community Services, and Spring Grove Hospital Center were greeted and shown to their tables. For the fifth year in a row, a delicious home-style Thanksgiving dinner would be servedScittino's, in Catonsville Junction, had expertly prepared the tasty, loosen-your-belt holiday feast.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | November 10, 2011
On Thanksgiving, one blessing for some of us is a large-group feast that we plan and prepare in stages for several days, if not weeks. Regardless of whether some of the guests are bringing a variety of side dishes, the head chef still has to wrestle with a turkey or two. Depending on the size this usually requires getting ol' Tom into the oven in the wee hours of Thanksgiving morning. Others of us are thankful for a smaller party. And it is to those November celebrants we proffer this petite menu of seasonal dishes that, while "lavish," can allow us to sleep in on Turkey Day, at least till it's light out. It may seem to flaunt tradition, but this somewhat free-form menu is designed for six (but there's plenty for eight)
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2010
Cynthia Brooks is not about to let a recession, dwindling donations or a disconnected phone stop her from helping the needy. The executive director of the Bea Gaddy Family Center in East Baltimore is keeping the doors open and moving forward with plans to serve Thanksgiving dinner to 50,000 people despite the center's financial woes. The center, founded by Brooks' mother, the late city councilwoman, is barely meeting the ever increasing demand for help. The floor-to-ceiling shelves for canned goods are often empty, and the leased refrigerated containers, which were mostly bare, are gone because the center couldn't afford them.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz | November 21, 2007
Flush with two vans of food and $1,200 raised at a benefit concert Friday, Baltimore's Bea Gaddy Family Center is ready for its annual Thanksgiving dinner, organizers said. Michael Austin, a jazz musician who spent 27 years behind bars for a city murder conviction that was overturned in early 2002, said he used to watch Bea Gaddy on television in prison and was moved by her generosity. This year, he put together a benefit concert and said he plans to do another one next fall. "It was the first time that I've ever experienced something so great that I had something to do with," Austin said.
FEATURES
By Jana Sanchez-Klein and Jana Sanchez-Klein,Contributing Writer | November 9, 1994
In Wednesday's food section an incorrect price was given for the Thanksgiving dinner specials at the Middleborough Inn. The correct price is $12.95.The Sun regrets the error.In a recent A La Carte story, incorrect operating hours were listed for Brightons. The restaurant will be open Thanksgiving Day noon to 8 p.m.+ The Sun regrets the errors.If you barely have enough time for everyday cooking, how will you find time to cook a Thanksgiving feast for family and friends?A few years ago, alternatives to cooking -- dining out -- were limited to the kind of chain restaurant that never closes and serves only warmed-over foods.
EXPLORE
January 8, 2012
Thanksgiving Day 2011 dawned bright and beautiful as over 60 volunteers made their way to help serve the Loverde Family Community Fund's Thanksgiving Day feast for the homeless. Around 1 p.m., the first of 160 guests from the Westside Homeless Shelter, Mosaic Community Services, and Spring Grove Hospital Center were greeted and shown to their tables. For the fifth year in a row, a delicious home-style Thanksgiving dinner would be servedScittino's, in Catonsville Junction, had expertly prepared the tasty, loosen-your-belt holiday feast.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick | November 23, 2011
There's still time to arrange a Thanksgiving dinner out. Two 11th-hour additions have been added. Jad's (137 Back River Neck Road, 410-686-2816, jadscaddyshack.com): The Essex restaurant, also known as Jade's Restaurant and Caddy Shack Lounge, is serving a Thanksgiving buffet. More details to come, but a reader called in to make sure that people knew about this affordable option, which she said was under $20. La Fontaine Bleue (7514 S. Ritchie Highway,  410-760-4115)
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2011
He has frequent lapses of memory, the result of a brain aneurysm he suffered as a teen in 1972. He struggled for years to keep jobs at BWI, at a discount store and in an industrial park. And finally, after his mother died in a Baltimore County nursing home, Fred Schaefle of Glen Burnie lost the condo in which he'd been living and ended up in a tent. "There's so much you don't appreciate until you don't have it," says the rangy, bearded 58-year-old with a shake of the head. "For example, indoor plumbing or a place to warm your food.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | November 10, 2011
On Thanksgiving, one blessing for some of us is a large-group feast that we plan and prepare in stages for several days, if not weeks. Regardless of whether some of the guests are bringing a variety of side dishes, the head chef still has to wrestle with a turkey or two. Depending on the size this usually requires getting ol' Tom into the oven in the wee hours of Thanksgiving morning. Others of us are thankful for a smaller party. And it is to those November celebrants we proffer this petite menu of seasonal dishes that, while "lavish," can allow us to sleep in on Turkey Day, at least till it's light out. It may seem to flaunt tradition, but this somewhat free-form menu is designed for six (but there's plenty for eight)
EXPLORE
By Janene Holzberg | October 25, 2011
Highly polished 15-foot-long tables are most often found in swanky boardrooms where top executives sit in upholstered chairs, their gazes fixed on the CEO who's running the meeting. In some ways, the scene is not all that different on Thanksgiving Day for the 59 family members who gather at the Hunt Valley residence of Mary Mangione, matriarch of five daughters and five sons, including Pete Mangione, Turf Valley Resort's longtime general manager.    Pocket doors glide open to reveal Mary's domain, a 15-by-25-foot dining room in which she joyfully presides over a gleaming expanse of mahogany that seats 14 quite comfortably.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2011
Thanksgiving is just around the corner, so we asked our staff about which nontraditional foods should be served on the Thanksgiving table along with the turkey, stuffing and mashed potatoes. •••• Buffalo chicken dip. It gives meaning to my life.  Luke Broadwater, reporter, The Baltimore Sun •••• My Aunt Josie always serves pasta in marinara sauce at her Thanksgiving dinner. As far as I know, there were no Italians on the Mayflower, but they would have improved the holiday cuisine for everybody.  Anne Tallent, editor,  b •••• There's always room at the table for Reese's Cups.  Wesley Case, reporter,  b •••• I'd like to go back to the original Thanksgiving and see some “water foule” and “five deere.” Yum!
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | November 29, 2010
At the end of Thanksgiving dinner, I listened to a conversation between a 96-year-old woman and her 20-year-old grandson. There's nothing extraordinary about such a thing at a family gathering — except that the grandson was 3,500 miles away. A granddaughter had cleared away a dessert dish and replaced it with a laptop computer, and now the grandmother was able to see, hear and speak to her grandson in Europe. It was her first Skype Thanksgiving. Everyone in the house gathered around the table to watch, in a way reminiscent of the scene in Barry Levinson's "Avalon," in which the late-1940s living room fills with people who've come to see television for the first time.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2010
Karen Brown came to the Thanksgiving dinner organized by the city of Baltimore and the American Red Cross full of gratitude. For each hug she gave out, she seemed to have two thank-yous for the help she's received since a tornado swept through her townhome last week. The storm came through Northeast Baltimore and Parkville on Nov. 17, causing extensive damage to homes, trees and utilities. "I have new friends and additional family," Brown said. "That's the police, the Red Cross, the SWAT team, the city … you name it. Everybody who had something to do with putting us back together and helping us to get our life back together, I send much praise to every one of them.
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