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Thanksgiving Day

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NEWS
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Blue Hill Tavern (938 S Conkling St., 443-388-9363, bluehilltavern.com): The Canton restaurant is serving  a $39.99 three-course prix fixe menu of Thanksgiving fare in addition to its regular a la carte menu. There are three seatings, between noon and 12:30, between 2:30 and 3 p.m. and between 5 and 5:30 p.m.  Cafe Troia (31 Allegheny Ave., 410-337-0133, www.cafetroia.com): The Towson restaurant will open at 2 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day, serving its regular menu as well as a prix fixe Thanksgiving dinner.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2013
Despite extra time to shop as more retailers opened for business on Thanksgiving Day, consumers spent less money this year during the first four days of the official start of the holiday shopping season, according to a survey released Sunday by the National Retail Federation. The group found that shoppers spent an average of $407.02 in stores and online from Thursday through Sunday, down from $423.55 a year ago. In all, shoppers spent an estimated $57.4 billion during the four days, down $1.7 billion compared with last year.
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NEWS
November 28, 1991
As American families gather today to give thanks this year, the nation is at peace -- and what a blessing it is. Only a year ago, many hearts trembled as tens of thousands of our finest young citizens were assembling far, far away in a bleak and desert landscape with war on their horizon and their lives on the line. The president spent the holiday with the troops in Saudi Arabia while, back home, anxious loved ones prayed with a special, if quiet, fervency.Today the fast, brutal war that was to come is now history.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
Opposed to shopping on Thanksgiving Day, Betty Allen of West Friendship waited until midnight to head to Walmart in Ellicott City for $2 DVDs and then shopped through the night without crowds to buy boots and clothing for her four children with stops at Kohl's, Target, Macy's and J.C. Penney. "It has been different this year," said Allen. "I'm used to lining up outside and rushing in. " Black Friday, the traditional kickoff to the holiday retail season, drew smaller-than-usual hordes of bargain hunters in the Baltimore area, probably because earlier Thanksgiving sales and staggered "limited supply" discounts spread shoppers out. Some shoppers missed the frenzy, while others embraced the relative calm.
NEWS
By ANDREA K. WALKER and ANDREA K. WALKER,SUN REPORTER | November 20, 2005
In between the Macy's parade, turkey dinner and afternoon football, Elizabeth Nightingale plans to slip in a bit of holiday shopping on Thanksgiving. Since most stores will be closed that day, the executive assistant at Advertising.com, a Baltimore Internet advertising company, will do her browsing and buying online. Thanksgiving was once a lost day for most retailers, who closed for the holiday. But now dozens of national chains such as Sears, Toys "R" Us and Wal-Mart Stores Inc. are planning special offers on their Web sites a day ahead of the traditional "Black Friday" rush.
FEATURES
By Marilyn Kluger and Marilyn Kluger,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | November 19, 1995
When the annual responsibility of "having Thanksgiving" for my immediate family and my nearest relatives first passed on to me, I was 26, and my kitchen measured 9 by 14 feet. There was room for only one cook, and I was on my own.That first Thanksgiving dinner was three hours late because the turkey took longer to cook than the time indicated on the chart. When the bird was finally tender, the hot rolls (punched down twice), sweet potatoes, corn pudding and pumpkin pie still had to be baked.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1997
Coming soon to a dinner table near you: Thanksgiving Day! Starring: Stuffing, Potatoes, Vegetables and Bread. And featuring: Tom Turkey.Turkey in a supporting role? It's true. They've always been stars in the making, those Thanksgiving side dishes, and now their time has come to shine.Nutritionists and other health experts have been telling us for years to move those all-important fruits and vegetables to the center of the plate. Now, with restaurant chefs, cookbook authors and home cooks paying more attention, those unheralded sides have been polished up, spiced up and given all the glamour they need to take center stage.
NEWS
By Duncan L. Hunter | November 25, 2013
The place was the U.S. House of Representatives. The time was the mid-1980s. I was a relative newcomer to Congress from California, and the Republican conference was hosting President Ronald Reagan. The president, beloved by the members, was coasting through a question-and-answer session, fielding the mostly "softball" questions with his legendary charm. Then Helen Delich Bentley, even more of a newcomer than I, stepped to the microphone. Her question was typical Bentley - blunt and reflective of the interests of the blue collar folks she represented.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2013
Despite extra time to shop as more retailers opened for business on Thanksgiving Day, consumers spent less money this year during the first four days of the official start of the holiday shopping season, according to a survey released Sunday by the National Retail Federation. The group found that shoppers spent an average of $407.02 in stores and online from Thursday through Sunday, down from $423.55 a year ago. In all, shoppers spent an estimated $57.4 billion during the four days, down $1.7 billion compared with last year.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
Turkey, duck, chicken or turducken — whatever you're cooking on Thanksgiving, make sure you're not whipping up a dangerous side of carbon monoxide. With a busy holiday and a house full of guests, it can be easy to leave the oven on and forget to ventilate properly, officials warn. The Baltimore Fire Department saw an "alarming strike," with 45 calls last Thanksgiving for carbon monoxide alarms, nearly five times as many as the average day, spokesman Ian Brennan said. "It's a completely preventable situation on Thanksgiving Day," he said.
BUSINESS
By Pamela Wood, Alison Knezevich, Jamie Smith Hopkins and Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
Anna Szuba of Pasadena shopped on Thanksgiving last year -- two hours in line to get in the store and three hours in line to get out. No thanks, she said. This year she started around midnight Friday and worked through her gift list among much smaller crowds. Black Friday is drawing shoppers this year as always, but it's a far more sedate scene locally and nationally with the continuing rise of Thanksgiving sales. Szuba appreciates it. She went to three stores after finishing a late shift at work, and by 5:30 a.m. at Toys R Us in Glen Burnie, she was about done.
SPORTS
By Rich Scherr and The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
Upon further review, Thursday's 94 th annual Turkey Bowl was not, the first overtime game in series history. It was at least the second. In 2000, the annual Thanksgiving Day classic went into two overtimes before Calvert Hall stopped a two-point conversion attempt to preserve a 7-6 win . The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
November 28, 2013
Bully for you Susan Reimer ( "Thanks for not shopping," Nov. 25)! Here's hoping that The Sun's readers will follow her lead and give a resounding no to shopping on Thanksgiving Day. Art Kelly, Towson - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
Temperatures were forecast to rise into the mid-40s by Wednesday morning in the Baltimore area as the rain continues, but gusty winds and possible snowflakes could still blow in by the afternoon to again slow those traveling for the Thanksgiving holiday. Snow was piling up in Western Maryland and across Pennsylvania on Tuesday, with travel to the Northeast expected to be treacherous into Thanksgiving Day as the storm moves up the East Coast. Those traveling by air also faced problems, with some delays and cancellations nationwide Tuesday.
NEWS
By Andrew L. Yarrow | November 26, 2013
As most Americans doze off in front of the TV after a few too many helpings of turkey and pumpkin pie this Thanksgiving, some 20 million others will be heading out to work. Called on by their employers to work on the holiday, most feel they cannot say no - they need the money or fear reprisal. Working on Thanksgiving and other holidays is not new, but the numbers of Americans doing so is climbing, and this trend is at least as much about dwindling workers' rights as it is about depressed wages.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
It seems that the state of South Dakota has a beef with Joan Jett. Or a lack of beef, more accurately. Jett, who spent her formative years in Rockville , is a vegetarian and an animal rights activist. She's so committed to animal rights that she's about to appear on some PETA-themed United States Postal Service  stamps.  And that means the South Dakota Cattlemen's Association has a problem with Jett appearing on the state's float in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City , according to CNN .  "Many livestock producers expressed concern about whether Joan Jett was an appropriate representative for an agriculturally oriented state like South Dakota," association executive director Jodie Anderson told CNN. So Joan Jett & the Blackhearts were moved off of South Dakota, to another, unspecified state.  "I've decided to switch from South Dakota to another float because people's political agendas were getting in the way of what should be a purely entertainment driven event," Jett said in a statement, according to CNN .  "I will remain focused on entertaining the millions of people watching, who will be celebrating a great American tradition," she said.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | November 29, 2009
We're only 72 hours past the sanctioned Day of National Gluttony, Thanksgiving, when it's considered unpatriotic to take on anything less than 25,000 calories. I'm sure everyone by now has had enough turkey, dressing, cranberries, mashed potatoes, peas, wedges of Aunt Maude's world famous pumpkin pie and Alka-Seltzer to last until Christmas, which comes around in only 26 days. However, I'm hoping that you've saved a little room for a calorie-free sliver of Thanksgiving history that was brought to my attention the other day by retired Baltimore County Circuit Judge John F. Fader II, whose hobbies include collecting and committing to memory arcane facts and incidents relating to U.S. history.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2011
Behind a push from City and Poly alumni who want to renew a tradition dear to their hearts, legislation was introduced Wednesday in the Maryland House of Delegates to allow the City-Poly football game to return to Thanksgiving Day if the two schools request the change. That, however, appears unlikely to happen, because unless City's and Poly's football programs withdraw from state championship contention — which they could have done at any time — the move to Thanksgiving Day would upset the state playoff system for all of the teams in City's and Poly's playoff regions.
NEWS
November 26, 2013
This schedule will be in effect Thursday, Nov. 28: Government offices Closed in Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Frederick, Harford and Howard counties, and in Annapolis and Baltimore City. (Anne Arundel, Carroll, Frederick, Harford and Howard counties, and Annapolis are also closed Friday, Nov. 29.) Courts Closed Thursday-Friday in all jurisdictions. Public schools Closed Thursday-Friday in all jurisdictions. Libraries Closed in all jurisdictions. Trash No pickup in Anne Arundel, Baltimore and Howard counties, and in Baltimore City and Annapolis.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | November 25, 2013
Please join me in not buying a darn thing this Thanksgiving Day. Have an extra piece of pie, take a nap, watch a little football, drink too much, fight with your in-laws. Just don't shop. "Black Friday creep," as they called it when it began a couple of years ago, has crept all the way into Thanksgiving Day, with at least one retailer opening before dawn Thursday and several others staying open straight through until Friday at midnight. There is a finite amount of Christmas money out there each year, and stores are racing to the front of the line to grab yours.
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