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By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | November 18, 2001
Q. Is it true that thalidomide is effective against cancer? How does it work, and how safe is it? Doesn't thalidomide cause birth defects? A. Thalidomide was responsible for one of the most terrible drug disasters of the 20th century. When pregnant women took this medication as a sleeping pill, their babies were born with deformed limbs. Although it was banned for decades, thalidomide has been resurrected as a new treatment for cancer and leprosy. It is especially effective against a blood cancer called multiple myeloma.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
At a lab on the edge of the Johns Hopkins University's East Baltimore medical campus, researchers grow tumors on mice so they can try and cure them. But one day, the cancer wouldn't grow. They tried again and again for months. Figuring there must be something different about this batch of mice, they finally discovered the rodents had been given a drug to prevent pinworm. Three years later, the common parasite treatment that retails for a few dollars a dose is being given to terminal brain cancer patients in a trial that could lead to more widespread use. Researchers who toiled for years for such a discovery said they still are investigating how it works.
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BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1997
Two small Maryland companies reported encouraging results yesterday from early clinical trials using thalidomide, the sedative banned since the 1960s for causing birth defects, to treat cancers and an AIDs-related condition.The results add further weight to a growing body of evidence that the drug may have potential in treating some of humans' most vexing diseases.In one clinical study, co-sponsored by Andrulis Pharmaceuticals Inc. of Beltsville, researchers found that thalidomide dramatically reduced or eliminated AIDS-related mouth and throat ulcers.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2004
In the 1960s, women who used the drug thalidomide to relieve morning sickness learned a terrible truth: It could cause major malformations - including missing arms and legs - in their children. Expectant mothers who took DES found out a decade later that the synthetic estrogen was linked to a rare type of vaginal cancer in their daughters. Those being treated today with the acne medication Accutane are strongly warned not to become pregnant while taking it; it too can cause birth defects.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | August 21, 1998
The Food and Drug Administration has granted EntreMed Inc. tax credits and other benefits to help it develop thalidomide as a treatment for Kaposi's sarcoma, a skin cancer associated with AIDS, the Rockville company announced yesterday.The company's thalidomide treatment won "orphan drug" status, an FDA category used to encourage the development of pharmaceuticals for relatively rare ailments such as Kaposi's sarcoma.Gaining orphan drug status is no guarantee that the treatment will win FDA approval.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF Bloomberg News contributed to this article | December 11, 1998
Rockville-based EntreMed Inc. said yesterday that it has transferred its rights to the controversial drug thalidomide, a potential treatment for cancer, to Celgene Corp. of Warren, N.J.The agreement also calls for Celgene to take on the responsibility and cost of human clinical trials of thalidomide.The drug has shown promise in preventing tumors from developing blood vessels needed for growth.Under the agreement, Celgene will immediately begin paying EntreMed an undisclosed percentage of royalties on sales of the drug.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | April 2, 1995
Nobody imagined that a drug blamed for 8,000 deformed babies -- limbless newborns with flippers and stumps at their shoulders and hips -- would ever become a force for good.The medication left a trail of sorrow that stretched around the world, touching 46 countries before disgraced pharmaceutical companies yanked it from the market in 1962. Even as the drug receded into history, the name thalidomide remained a ghastly reminder of medicine gone bad.But in an atmosphere of caution and hope, thalidomide has re-emerged.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | April 5, 1996
EntreMed, a small Rockville biopharmaceutical company, and drug giant Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. have jointly launched the first human clinical trials in the United States to determine whether thalidomide, the sedative banned decades ago because causes birth defects, may provide a dramatic new way to treat cancer.If that proves true, the drug, which triggered a mountain of lawsuits in the 1950s, could become a big profit generator again, say pharmaceutical industry analysts.Critical Phase II trials are being launched this month at three medical institutions, Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, the National Institutes of Health's Clinical Center in Bethesda and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1995
Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., one of the nation's largest pharmaceutical firms, said yesterday that it will join a Maryland company's effort to show that thalidomide, banned in the U.S. market decades ago because it causes birth defects, is an effective treatment for some cancers.The deal between Bristol-Myers and privately held EntreMed of Rockville is further evidence of the growing interest in thalidomide and related compounds as potentially powerful tools for the treatment of several diseases, including AIDS, leprosy and cancer.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2001
EntreMed Inc. reported a rare, $6.2 million third-quarter profit yesterday, thanks to $22.4 million in one-time proceeds from the sale in August of its rights to the drug thalidomide. Revenue, however, dropped to $90,988 for the quarter from $854,170 in the third quarter a year ago, a reflection of the fact that the company no longer was receiving a percentage of every thalidomide sale. Thalidomide has been making a comeback as a cancer drug. It had been banned for more than 30 years as a treatment for morning sickness because it caused severe birth defects.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2003
EntreMed Inc. said yesterday that it had sold rights to a line of its experimental drugs to Celgene Corp. in a New Year's Eve deal worth about $27 million, giving the Rockville drug developer what amounted to a last-hour reprieve as it was about to run out of cash. Neil J. Campbell, company president and chief operating officer, described the licensing of EntreMed's thalidomide analogs - variations of the drug thalidomide - as part of a plan that will lead to the company's "rebirth." But Ivonne E. Marondel, an analyst at Gerard Klauer Mattison, said it appeared the company was selling off assets in a fire sale and might eventually be taken over by Celgene.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2002
Celgene Corp. has filed suit against the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to keep EntreMed Inc. from getting a crucially needed patent on a potential new anti-cancer drug. The civil action, disclosed yesterday by EntreMed, represents yet another blow to the struggling Rockville company, which analysts say is short on cash and time. "This is not good - by any means," said associate analyst Peter McDonald, who follows EntreMed for Gerard Klauer Mattison in New York. "The company has had enough problems as it is."
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2002
EntreMed Inc. said yesterday that it has sufficient cash to finance operations until the end of the year, but the struggling Rockville drug developer acknowledged it faces another financial hurdle soon. EntreMed must renegotiate an agreement with Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. by Dec. 1, or face the possibility of buying back 291,666 of its own shares at a guaranteed price of $13.14 each, according to a recent company filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. EntreMed can ill afford the $3.8 million the buyback might cost.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | November 29, 2001
EntreMed Inc. said it began a clinical trial yesterday in which cancer patients are injecting themselves at home with the anti-tumor drug Endostatin. The trial, for patients with neuroendocrine tumors, is the latest step in the company's attempt to develop cancer drugs that are free of side effects. The aim is to make cancer a manageable disease, much like diabetes. EntreMed expects 32 patients to enroll in the Endostatin trial at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. The Phase II trial, focused on measuring the drug's effectiveness, is the second of three phases of human testing required by the Food and Drug Administration.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | November 18, 2001
Q. Is it true that thalidomide is effective against cancer? How does it work, and how safe is it? Doesn't thalidomide cause birth defects? A. Thalidomide was responsible for one of the most terrible drug disasters of the 20th century. When pregnant women took this medication as a sleeping pill, their babies were born with deformed limbs. Although it was banned for decades, thalidomide has been resurrected as a new treatment for cancer and leprosy. It is especially effective against a blood cancer called multiple myeloma.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2001
EntreMed Inc. reported a rare, $6.2 million third-quarter profit yesterday, thanks to $22.4 million in one-time proceeds from the sale in August of its rights to the drug thalidomide. Revenue, however, dropped to $90,988 for the quarter from $854,170 in the third quarter a year ago, a reflection of the fact that the company no longer was receiving a percentage of every thalidomide sale. Thalidomide has been making a comeback as a cancer drug. It had been banned for more than 30 years as a treatment for morning sickness because it caused severe birth defects.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2001
EntreMed Inc. has raised $24.3 million by selling the last of its rights to a once-reviled drug now making a comeback as a cancer treatment. In selling its rights to future royalties from the sales of thalidomide, Rockville-based EntreMed brings in much needed money to pay for development of its other experimental drugs. The company also avoids resorting to a stock sale during a down market, something analysts said surely would have further dampened the price of its shares. "I'm very pleased," EntreMed Chief Executive Officer John W. Holaday said yesterday morning, just after the company announced the deal with Royalty Pharma AG. Aside from receiving the $24.3 million, he noted, EntreMed stands to get another $3 million if certain, undisclosed sales milestones are achieved.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
At a lab on the edge of the Johns Hopkins University's East Baltimore medical campus, researchers grow tumors on mice so they can try and cure them. But one day, the cancer wouldn't grow. They tried again and again for months. Figuring there must be something different about this batch of mice, they finally discovered the rodents had been given a drug to prevent pinworm. Three years later, the common parasite treatment that retails for a few dollars a dose is being given to terminal brain cancer patients in a trial that could lead to more widespread use. Researchers who toiled for years for such a discovery said they still are investigating how it works.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2001
EntreMed Inc. has raised $24.3 million by selling the last of its rights to a once-reviled drug now making a comeback as a cancer treatment. In selling its rights to future royalties from the sales of thalidomide, Rockville-based EntreMed brings in much needed money to pay for development of its other experimental drugs. The company also avoids resorting to a stock sale during a down market, something analysts said surely would have further dampened the price of its shares. "I'm very pleased," EntreMed Chief Executive Officer John W. Holaday said yesterday morning, just after the company announced the deal with Royalty Pharma AG. Aside from receiving the $24.3 million, he noted, EntreMed stands to get another $3 million if certain, undisclosed sales milestones are achieved.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1999
EntreMed Inc., the Rockville biotechnology company whose experimental anti-cancer drugs generated widespread news coverage and controversy last year, reported yesterday that its fourth-quarter and annual loss more than doubled as the company stepped up development efforts.For the three months that ended Dec. 31, EntreMed posted a loss of $4.6 million, or 35 cents per share, compared with a $2.1 million loss, or 17 cents per share, a year ago. Revenue was $1.5 million, up from $1.3 million.
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