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By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2010
At least for today, I think Thai Yum is Baltimore's best Thai restaurant. Word will soon spread, and Thai Yum might not be ready for a sudden crush. When we visited, Penny Chungsakoon appeared to be working the line herself. There are unresolved service issues. Please be patient with it. This is the restaurant that used to be known as Ten-O-Six, from its street number on Light Street. When Tom and Penny Chungsakoon opened it back in 1999, the Federal Hill restaurant worked with an innovative menu that was half fusion (with exotic or then rarely seen ingredients such as wild boar, sweetbreads and ostrich)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2010
At least for today, I think Thai Yum is Baltimore's best Thai restaurant. Word will soon spread, and Thai Yum might not be ready for a sudden crush. When we visited, Penny Chungsakoon appeared to be working the line herself. There are unresolved service issues. Please be patient with it. This is the restaurant that used to be known as Ten-O-Six, from its street number on Light Street. When Tom and Penny Chungsakoon opened it back in 1999, the Federal Hill restaurant worked with an innovative menu that was half fusion (with exotic or then rarely seen ingredients such as wild boar, sweetbreads and ostrich)
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NEWS
By Cynthia Glover and Cynthia Glover,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 1, 2003
To call David Thompson's thai food a cookbook is to do it a disservice. It is more a life's work for this Australian chef and restaurateur. He has spent the past 15 years studying Thai cuisine, and has incorporated almost everything he has learned about its history, peoples, geography and foodstuffs into this 673-page reference book. His Thai restaurant in London, nahm, is the first Thai restaurant ever to earn a Michelin star. The man knows his stuff. Yes, thai food (Ten Speed Press, 2002, $40)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2010
The chef and the owners remain the same, but the Federal Hill Thai-American restaurant known as Ten-O-Six is now known as Thai Yum and, as its name suggests, will be exclusively Thai. A big hit after its 1999 opening, in its heyday Ten-O-Six was especially admired for chef Tom Chungkasoon's artful and ambitious fusion dishes, which might feature medallions of ostrich, sweetbreads or even wild boar. Then, for no particular reason, Ten-O-Six seemed to recede from the spotlight and never fully work its way back in. In the e-mailed message announcing the change, Chungkasoon wrote, "Due to the increasing popularity of Thai cuisine, we refined our cooking to only center around Thai cooking.
FEATURES
By Pat Dailey and Pat Dailey,Chicago Tribune | May 6, 1992
Cooking classes are a great way to learn about cuisines. Trouble is, the teacher isn't around at dinner time, when you're most likely to need a guiding hand. But if you have your eye on Thai, there is a teacher who makes house calls. Sort of.Global Village is a Seattle company that offers a mini-correspondence course in Thai cuisine. It sells baskets by mail that are filled with hard-to-find ingredients. A booklet gives recipes and information about the culture.The Thai Village Basket, the most popular of the company's six baskets, includes dried galangal (a fragrant ginger-like root)
NEWS
By Jody Vilschick and Jody Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 4, 2001
Celebrating the 15th anniversary of Bangkok Delight's opening this month, Randy Jett has maintained its unusual dM-icor of up-side-down traditional Thai silk umbrellas. "The original owners liked the look of the Thai umbrellas and the different designs and colors on the umbrellas and thought they would look much better than the typical ceilings, and they did," he says. Thai food has an international reputation for being fiery spicy - but that isn't necessarily so, according to Jett, who bought the restaurant in 1995.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2010
The chef and the owners remain the same, but the Federal Hill Thai-American restaurant known as Ten-O-Six is now known as Thai Yum and, as its name suggests, will be exclusively Thai. A big hit after its 1999 opening, in its heyday, Ten-O-Six was especially admired for chef Tom Chungkasoon's artful and ambitious fusion dishes, which might feature medallions of ostrich, sweetbreads or even wild boar. Then, for no particular reason, Ten-O-Six seemed to recede from the spotlight and never fully work its way back in. In the emailed message announcing the change, Chungksasoon wrote, "Due to the increasing popularity of Thai cuisine, we refined our cooking to only center around Thai cooking.
FEATURES
By GAIL FORMAN | May 29, 1994
Spicy foods make you warm when it's cold outside, cool when it's hot. Hot spices awaken the appetite while stimulating the release of endorphins that make you feel relaxed and satisfied. So no wonder Thai cooking, which uses hot spices to perfection, is one of America's most popular ethnic cuisines.In classical Thai cooking a typical daily meal is not divided into courses. Soup, such as the celebrated shrimp with lemon-grass broth, is a beverage eaten throughout the meal. And all dishes are served at once -- perhaps a raw vegetable salad, stir-fried vegetables, spicy curried meat, grilled seafood and steamed rice, or khow.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | October 10, 2007
At a time when some places are moving away from tapas back to more traditional menus, the new Ranazul (8171 Maple Lawn Blvd., 301-498-9666) in Maple Lawn has embraced the concept wholeheartedly. "An international fusion kind of thing" is how Chad Price, the restaurant's marketing director, described the cuisine behind the small plates. That means Salmon-Avocado Sushi (sliced salmon with Chinese mustard and seasoned avocado on a bed of seaweed salad) as well as Arepas (corn cake with crab, shrimp and tomato ragout)
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | June 27, 2004
IT was a dark and stormy night. OK, it was raining gently but steadily on a June evening, but still... It was the kind of evening when you want comfort food in a cozy setting, with the staff welcoming you like family. Thai Landing, one of Baltimore's first Thai restaurants, delivered on all counts. The last time I ate there was 10 years ago. But the number of new restaurants that have opened up on Thai Landing's section of Charles Street has stirred my interest in the old ones, and I remembered my last meal there -- even though distantly -- with pleasure.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | December 24, 2007
Marketgoers lugged bushel boxes of mustard and collard greens. Some stood sniffing squares of oatmeal lavender and avocado-castor oil soaps. Others purchased red and white poinsettias and greenery, last minute touches of holiday decor. Christmas shoppers and those who make the Baltimore Farmers' Market a Sunday ritual came out in droves yesterday, the last day until May for a market that celebrated its 30th year downtown this season. The damp gray weather didn't dissuade customers from having that last brunch under the Jones Falls Expressway, from taking that final chance to load up on produce for holiday feasts and snag gifts for the names still on their lists.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | October 10, 2007
At a time when some places are moving away from tapas back to more traditional menus, the new Ranazul (8171 Maple Lawn Blvd., 301-498-9666) in Maple Lawn has embraced the concept wholeheartedly. "An international fusion kind of thing" is how Chad Price, the restaurant's marketing director, described the cuisine behind the small plates. That means Salmon-Avocado Sushi (sliced salmon with Chinese mustard and seasoned avocado on a bed of seaweed salad) as well as Arepas (corn cake with crab, shrimp and tomato ragout)
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | June 27, 2004
IT was a dark and stormy night. OK, it was raining gently but steadily on a June evening, but still... It was the kind of evening when you want comfort food in a cozy setting, with the staff welcoming you like family. Thai Landing, one of Baltimore's first Thai restaurants, delivered on all counts. The last time I ate there was 10 years ago. But the number of new restaurants that have opened up on Thai Landing's section of Charles Street has stirred my interest in the old ones, and I remembered my last meal there -- even though distantly -- with pleasure.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2003
Asian Rim restaurant, newly opened at the lakefront in Columbia, is bringing Thai, Malaysian and other Asian cuisine to the popular dining area. The owners of Asian Rim previously operated the Malibu Grill at the same location, next to Sushi Sono at Lake Kittamaqundi. That restaurant was a churrascaria (a Portuguese word for steakhouse) notable for the servers in cowboy outfits walking around with skewers of cooked meat. The Malibu Grill, which opened in December 1999, was not doing well at that location, said owner Allen Wong.
NEWS
By Cynthia Glover and Cynthia Glover,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 1, 2003
To call David Thompson's thai food a cookbook is to do it a disservice. It is more a life's work for this Australian chef and restaurateur. He has spent the past 15 years studying Thai cuisine, and has incorporated almost everything he has learned about its history, peoples, geography and foodstuffs into this 673-page reference book. His Thai restaurant in London, nahm, is the first Thai restaurant ever to earn a Michelin star. The man knows his stuff. Yes, thai food (Ten Speed Press, 2002, $40)
NEWS
By Jody Vilschick and Jody Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 4, 2001
Celebrating the 15th anniversary of Bangkok Delight's opening this month, Randy Jett has maintained its unusual dM-icor of up-side-down traditional Thai silk umbrellas. "The original owners liked the look of the Thai umbrellas and the different designs and colors on the umbrellas and thought they would look much better than the typical ceilings, and they did," he says. Thai food has an international reputation for being fiery spicy - but that isn't necessarily so, according to Jett, who bought the restaurant in 1995.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1997
Who knew exploring Thai food could be this much fun?At the Bangkok Oriental in Pasadena, a little place in a Ritchie Highway strip mall, the food was delicious, portions generous, atmosphere charming, and waiters and patrons anxious to help me and my dining accomplice Gary navigate Southeast Asian cuisine.We began with an appetizer of fried tofu with sweet and sour pepper dip. Chewing the tofu seemed to go on forever, and although the bright red sauce with crushed peanuts provided the flavor of the dish, it was not enough to carry the tofu wedges, which were sadly cracker-like.
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