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Thabo Mbeki

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NEWS
July 20, 1996
PRESIDENT NELSON Mandela is an extraordinary man. He emerged from 26 years of isolation in South African jails without evident bitterness or thirst for revenge. He resumed his anti-apartheid leadership as if he had never been away, providing wisdom and pragmatism as his country began dismantling its white-supremacist political system and institutions. A measure of his achievement is that whereas many whites previously fretted about Mr. Mandela coming to power, they now worry about what will happen after he leaves office.
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NEWS
June 21, 1999
IT WAS in 1986 that Thabo Mbeki, a revolutionary in exile, had long talks in New York with a leader of white Afrikaner society. That opened a dialogue between the outlawed African National Congress and the apartheid government, culminating in the peaceful transition of South Africa under the ANC's Nelson Mandela, released from prison.As Mr. Mandela's chosen political heir, Mr. Mbeki has been running the country day-to-day as executive deputy president. His inauguration as president last Wednesday, two days before his 57th birthday, represented generational change.
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NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 1, 1999
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Thabo Mbeki is the man who will try to fill Nelson Mandela's shoes this year, when he seems certain to be elected the second black president of the new South Africa.President of the ruling African National Congress and deputy president to Mandela, Mbeki is a very apparent heir.But who is this man who is about to emerge from behind one of the largest shadows cast on the modern world stage?The answer, to considerable degree, can be gleaned from a new book, which clusters 42 of his speeches spanning the past 34 years.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 1, 1999
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Thabo Mbeki is the man who will try to fill Nelson Mandela's shoes this year, when he seems certain to be elected the second black president of the new South Africa.President of the ruling African National Congress and deputy president to Mandela, Mbeki is a very apparent heir.But who is this man who is about to emerge from behind one of the largest shadows cast on the modern world stage?The answer, to considerable degree, can be gleaned from a new book, which clusters 42 of his speeches spanning the past 34 years.
NEWS
December 25, 1997
NELSON MANDELA will remain South Africa's president until his term ends in 1999. But the daily running of the government has already largely shifted into the hands of Thabo Mbeki, his 55-year-old deputy who last week was elected president of the ruling African National Congress.Africa's post-colonial history is full of freedom fighter presidents who could not relinquish power. Mr. Mandela, 79, decided he would not go down in history as having stayed on too long. He insisted that his initial timetable for the transfer of power be adhered to. He is ready to assume the role of elder statesman, letting a younger generation take charge.
NEWS
June 21, 1999
IT WAS in 1986 that Thabo Mbeki, a revolutionary in exile, had long talks in New York with a leader of white Afrikaner society. That opened a dialogue between the outlawed African National Congress and the apartheid government, culminating in the peaceful transition of South Africa under the ANC's Nelson Mandela, released from prison.As Mr. Mandela's chosen political heir, Mr. Mbeki has been running the country day-to-day as executive deputy president. His inauguration as president last Wednesday, two days before his 57th birthday, represented generational change.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 1, 1999
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Thabo Mbeki is the man who will try to fill Nelson Mandela's shoes this year, when he seems certain to be elected the second black president of the new South Africa.President of the ruling African National Congress and deputy president to Mandela, Mbeki is a very apparent heir.But who is this man who is about to emerge from behind one of the largest shadows cast on the modern world stage?The answer, to considerable degree, can be gleaned from a new book, which clusters 42 of his speeches spanning the past 34 years.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | March 18, 1995
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Even before police staged a highly publicized raid on her Soweto mansion, the travails of Winnie Mandela were dividing South Africa.With few exceptions, white callers and letter writers on radio talk shows and in newspapers have convicted her of corruption, saying that her continued presence in the government as deputy minister of culture and science is a national embarrassment.Many blacks dismiss the corruption allegations as an attempt by the forces that supported apartheid to discredit a powerful opponent.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 14, 2005
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Helen Suzman still gets hate mail. These days it comes mainly from black South Africans, not white defenders of the racist apartheid regime against which she waged a determined and often lonely battle during 36 years in Parliament. "You were just a spy of the Jews," begins the latest letter, an unsigned note that arrived this week alleging Jewish exploitation of the country's majority black population. Suzman, who is sharp of mind and tongue at 87, tossed the letter on a table at her home north of Johannesburg and said such nastiness did not bother her. "I don't frighten easily," she said.
NEWS
June 8, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the Australian, in New South Wales, which was published Wednesday.CHANGE of government anywhere can be risky but South Africa faces an extraordinarily delicate period in its development. Most South Africans still live in poverty, waiting for basic material living conditions that they believe are theirs by right.Nelson Mandela's government was one of transition and reconciliation. The need to build economic and social stability, while reinforcing political integrity and transparency, is just as crucial but the task requires a government and leader prepared to forge their own path.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 1, 1999
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Thabo Mbeki is the man who will try to fill Nelson Mandela's shoes this year, when he seems certain to be elected the second black president of the new South Africa.President of the ruling African National Congress and deputy president to Mandela, Mbeki is a very apparent heir.But who is this man who is about to emerge from behind one of the largest shadows cast on the modern world stage?The answer, to considerable degree, can be gleaned from a new book, which clusters 42 of his speeches spanning the past 34 years.
NEWS
December 25, 1997
NELSON MANDELA will remain South Africa's president until his term ends in 1999. But the daily running of the government has already largely shifted into the hands of Thabo Mbeki, his 55-year-old deputy who last week was elected president of the ruling African National Congress.Africa's post-colonial history is full of freedom fighter presidents who could not relinquish power. Mr. Mandela, 79, decided he would not go down in history as having stayed on too long. He insisted that his initial timetable for the transfer of power be adhered to. He is ready to assume the role of elder statesman, letting a younger generation take charge.
NEWS
July 20, 1996
PRESIDENT NELSON Mandela is an extraordinary man. He emerged from 26 years of isolation in South African jails without evident bitterness or thirst for revenge. He resumed his anti-apartheid leadership as if he had never been away, providing wisdom and pragmatism as his country began dismantling its white-supremacist political system and institutions. A measure of his achievement is that whereas many whites previously fretted about Mr. Mandela coming to power, they now worry about what will happen after he leaves office.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | March 18, 1995
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Even before police staged a highly publicized raid on her Soweto mansion, the travails of Winnie Mandela were dividing South Africa.With few exceptions, white callers and letter writers on radio talk shows and in newspapers have convicted her of corruption, saying that her continued presence in the government as deputy minister of culture and science is a national embarrassment.Many blacks dismiss the corruption allegations as an attempt by the forces that supported apartheid to discredit a powerful opponent.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 14, 2007
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- A split between the South African government and labor unions deepened yesterday as thousands of striking public-sector workers rallied for a 10 percent pay raise, in a contest seen by many as a precursor to the struggle over who will succeed President Thabo Mbeki. Hospitals, schools and transportation have been disrupted in a public-sector strike that has seen violence, as workers intimidated students taking exams and family members visiting the sick in hospitals.
NEWS
By Ann M. Simmons and Ann M. Simmons,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 12, 2003
MONROVIA, Liberia - Charles Taylor, an indicted war-crimes suspect and one-time warlord, resigned yesterday as Liberia's president and went into exile, raising hopes for an end to the West African nation's violent rebellion. Waving a white handkerchief to onlookers and accompanied by his wife, two children and several close aides, Taylor boarded a chartered jet bound for Nigeria, which had offered him asylum. Many of his supporters who gathered at the airport wept as Taylor flew off after ceding power to his vice president, Moses Blah.
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