Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTextiles
IN THE NEWS

Textiles

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 12, 2010
"It's a patchwork," says Anita Jones, curator of the intimate new exhibit, "Textiles Recycled/Reimagined" at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Punning aside, the 12-item display draws together a diverse sampling from the museum's holdings that help to demonstrate a hot topic of the day. "We're trying to show how textiles have always been 'green,' " Jones says. A century or so ago, as hooked rugs made in Newfoundland became very popular, an appeal was made to women all over the continent: "When your stockings run, let them run to Labrador."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Bob Allen, For The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2013
The Civil War experience has been preserved over the past 150 years through a variety of media: books, newspaper accounts, films, drawings, paintings, diaries ... and fabrics. Columbia resident Mavis Slawson has made the latter her specialty as a textile historian and docent at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in Frederick. She often gives presentations about the role of textiles in the Civil War, examining their role not only as practical materials but also in conveying and preserving culture across the battlefield.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | August 28, 2005
Susan Harris' life certainly imitates her art. The Connecticut-based artist's life is all about her textile business, SeaCloth. The business and accompanying store of the same name in Greenwich, co-founded by marketing executive Deirdre Halper, features an extensive collection of textiles, all based on Harris' watercolors, as well as a line of home furnishings and decorative accessories. Launched in 2003, SeaCloth has grown to offer five distinctive collections, each based on Harris' works and each reflective of nature's ever-changing moods.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2013
Leon Samuel Idas, who owned a commercial used clothing business and fought the German occupation of his native Greece during World War II, died of a cerebral ailment April 12 at his home in Lauderhill, Fla. He was 87 years old and formerly lived in Bolton Hill. Born in Athens, Greece, he was the son of Samuel and Miriam Ioudas, who also used the name Gabrielides. His father was a textile merchant. "My father's early life was interrupted by the invasion of his beloved homeland, by the Germans during World War II," said his son, Samuel Idas of Fort Lauderdale, Fla. "At 16, Leon fled the Nazi-fortified city of Athens with forged documents and instructions from underground resistance leaders.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | October 6, 1991
For years jewelry-maker Penny Diamanti hoped that someone would open up the kind of store she longed to shop in: an extravaganza of beads from all over the world plus jewelry, textiles and crafts -- a tidy little version of a bazaar you could imagine somewhere along the East Indian trade routes.She finally got tired of waiting and two years ago opened Beadazzled on Connecticut Avenue in Washington.Now she and her partner, husband Erik de Widt, have brought Beadazzled to Baltimore. Just two weeks ago they opened the new shop in a bright and airy building -- a former bank -- at the corner of Charles and Franklin streets.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 11, 1996
SHANGHAI, China -- China announced a ban on the importing of selected goods from the United States yesterday, stepping up a trade dispute with the Clinton administration and sending a blunt signal that it will not easily succumb to pressure.With Secretary of State Warren Christopher set to visit China in less than two weeks, the promise to further restrict China's market from American exporters seemed timed to draw maximum attention.Although Christopher plans to leave office soon, his successor appears likely to face a growing number of trade disputes with China.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | February 1, 1991
Occupations and incomeOil revenues have brought an almost across-the-board increase in the standard of living since 1970. Per-capita income increased from $630 in 1970 to $24,000 a year in 1979.However, prices are much higher in Iraq than in the United States. Iraq is considered wealthy in the Arab world because of its farming and oil potential. But Iraqis are still poorer than their neighbors.Oil, farming and textiles are main occupations. Farmers depend on what they grow -- barley, wheat, rice and dates -- for their family's food, and try to sell the excess.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Claire Wang | March 31, 2005
Textile exhibit Explore the role that textiles played in the customs of Southeast Asia in the Textile Museum's exhibit Textiles for This World and Beyond: Treasures from Insular Southeast Asia. The 60-piece collection includes 19th- to 20th-century textiles in colors and patterns that indicate their use in daily life, social distinctions and ceremonies marking life transitions. The display includes carved and painted figurines depicting Central Java costumes and clothing from the early 20th century.
FEATURES
By Brenda Fowler and Brenda Fowler,New York Times News Service | July 25, 1995
When the Egyptologist Howard Carter uncovered the tomb of the Pharaoh Tutankhamen in 1922, it was the brilliant gold of the funeral mask and other artifacts that awed the world. But the tomb also contained wooden chests filled with the boy king's clothes and footwear.Along with most of the rest of the treasures, the bulk of the textiles, some reduced to dust, ended up in a storeroom at the Cairo Museum.When Carter died in 1939, his Tutankhamen archive, including 1,500 photographs, many drawings and 2,500 note cards documenting the textiles, was deposited at the Griffith Institute at Oxford University in England.
NEWS
November 29, 1993
Orange juice, it's not just from Florida any more. Nor is peanut butter only from Georgia or cotton textiles from South Carolina.While attention here has focused on U.S. trade relations with Mexico and Canada, and then with the nations of the Pacific Rim, a global economic tug of war has continued in relative obscurity. The stakes are far higher, and they will influence how much U.S. consumers pay for their groceries as well as for sophisticated electronics. Not to mention the potential creation of 1.4 million more jobs in this country in the next 10 years -- far more than could be sucked across the Rio Grande River by the North American Free Trade Agreement even in Ross Perot's wildest nightmares.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 21, 2010
Services for Tim Potee, the Hampden vintage clothing store owner who supplied items for several of filmmaker John Waters' movies, will be held at noon Monday at the Burgee-Henss-Seitz Funeral Home, 3631 Falls Road. Mr. Potee was found dead Monday of pneumonia at his Hampden apartment above his Dreamland Vintage Clothing store. He was 52. Mr. Waters said that the clothier "will be missed by the film community. He will be missed by the fashion community. He will be missed by the Hampden community.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 12, 2010
"It's a patchwork," says Anita Jones, curator of the intimate new exhibit, "Textiles Recycled/Reimagined" at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Punning aside, the 12-item display draws together a diverse sampling from the museum's holdings that help to demonstrate a hot topic of the day. "We're trying to show how textiles have always been 'green,' " Jones says. A century or so ago, as hooked rugs made in Newfoundland became very popular, an appeal was made to women all over the continent: "When your stockings run, let them run to Labrador."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts | March 19, 2009
Baltimore's Contemporary Museum at 100 W. Centre St. will be transformed into an environmental think tank and laboratory when the Futurefarmers art collective from San Francisco opens The Reverse Ark: In the Wake, an exhibit exploring the social, historical and environmental history of the city's mills and textile industry, running March 26 to Aug. 22. Using the concept of an "ark" as a place of preservation and exploration, Futurefarmers will work with...
NEWS
By Robert M. Hathaway and Edward Gresser | September 26, 2008
Seven months ago, Pakistanis hoped elections would usher in a brighter era. Instead, skies are darkening. As President Asif Ali Zardari visited the United Nations and met with President Bush this week, Pakistan watchers worried that simultaneous political and economic crises are pushing the country toward disaster. In response, both the administration and its Democratic critics advocate a new round of foreign aid increases. But past aid increases have failed to achieve results. If we expect different results, we need a different approach: an economic policy built upon trade and job creation for Pakistan's people, not just aid to its soldiers and ministries.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | March 21, 2008
Ursula N. McCracken, former director of the Textile Museum in Washington who earlier had been director of development at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland, died Monday of brain cancer at her West University Parkway home. She was 66. Ursula Naylor Eland was born in New York City, and raised in England and Stamford, Conn. She earned a bachelor's degree in the history of art from Wellesley College in 1963 and received two master's degrees from Johns Hopkins University. Mrs. McCracken received a master's degree in the history of ideas in 1984 and, two years later, a master's in administrative sciences, or nonprofit management.
NEWS
November 28, 2007
Milton Claude Henry, a retired textile executive and World War II naval aviator, died of gastric cancer Sunday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Mays Chapel resident was 88. Mr. Henry was born and raised in Rocky Mount, N.C. During the Depression, he helped his father establish C.S. Henry Trucking Co., and though he wasn't old enough for a commercial license, he worked as a driver for the fledgling company. He enlisted in the Navy in 1941 and, after completing training as an aviation machinist's mate, was assigned to VPB-105 Patrol Bombing Squadron in England.
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | June 17, 1991
CHICAGO -- If you don't have a mentor to guide your career, hire one.That was the advice given to women in the 1970s by women's employment advocates, who observed that men with mentors often get an extra boost up the corporate ladder.And it turns out they were right.A new study of women executives shows that if you're chosen as a protege to be guided by a more experienced, higher-ranking person -- you, too, will move up the career ladder faster.Having a qualified professional in your corner who shows you the ropes "actually does make a difference," said Lucy R. Sibley, professor and chairwoman of the department of textiles and clothing at Ohio State University.
BUSINESS
June 17, 1991
Mentors aid in careerIf you don't have a mentor to guide your career, hire one.A new study of women executives shows that if you're chosen as a protege to be guided by a more experienced, higher-ranking person -- you, too, will move up the career ladder faster."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | June 7, 2007
Thomas Gary Hardie II, a textile machinery business owner who later co-wrote a newspaper column about being a grandparent, died Tuesday of complications from a traumatic brain injury at Roland Park Place. The former Butler resident was 85. Born in New Orleans and raised in Roland Park, he was a 1939 Gilman School graduate and earned an economics degree from Princeton. He served in the Army Air Forces during World War II and was a pilot spotting the enemy in the Philippines. He attained the rank of captain and was awarded an Air Medal for bravery.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.