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By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | July 22, 1991
Ethel Beaudoin, a stitcher for 30 years at John Roberts Clothing Co. in Biddeford, Maine, liked her work so much that in June she bought the company.Not by herself, of course. Beaudoin, also president of Local 667A, Amalgamated Clothing Textile Workers Union, is a founder of a new workers' corporation that saved the bankrupt company and the jobs of its 170 garment workers, 90 percent of them women.The takeover plans leave management in place, but union members such as Beaudoin are co-owners and members of the board under an employee stock ownership plan that takes effect at the end of the year.
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NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 2, 2002
WASHINGTON - In a big victory for President Bush, the Senate voted yesterday to allow him to negotiate trade deals that Congress could accept or reject but not amend. Bush has called such presidential authority vital to America's economy. The bill, which has passed the House and awaits Bush's signature, will revive a power that presidents wielded for two decades before it lapsed eight years ago. It had been stalled in Congress ever since. The margin was a comfortable 64-34, with 20 Democrats joining 43 Republicans and one independent in favor.
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NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1998
Carmen Samuel Papale, a former marker and cutter of men's suits who later headed a union representing thousands of area clothing workers, died of cancer Friday at his home in Harford County. He was 61.Before his retirement last year, Mr. Papale was international vice president of UNITE, the Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees, and chief principal officer of the Baltimore Regional Joint Board, an organization representing 4,000 union workers in a four-state area.As the union's highest ranking Maryland official during a time of declining membership, he earned a reputation as a skilled negotiator and tough but realistic labor leader.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1998
Carmen Samuel Papale, a former marker and cutter of men's suits who later headed a union representing thousands of area clothing workers, died of cancer Friday at his home in Harford County. He was 61.Before his retirement last year, Mr. Papale was international vice president of UNITE, the Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees, and chief principal officer of the Baltimore Regional Joint Board, an organization representing 4,000 union workers in a four-state area.As the union's highest ranking Maryland official during a time of declining membership, he earned a reputation as a skilled negotiator and tough but realistic labor leader.
NEWS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | September 27, 1994
Bitter but resigned, factory workers at London Fog Corp. yesterday approved a contract that will keep a scaled-down Baltimore plant operating but close two others in Western Maryland and cut the pay of remaining workers.Yesterday's vote climaxed months of contentious on-again, off-again talks that had seen the company continually raise the stakes, finally putting the livelihood of 700 workers on the line.Faced with a total shutdown by the end of October, members of the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union voted 478-to-174 for the two-year agreement that preserved the jobs of 220 of them and improved severance for the rest.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 2, 2002
WASHINGTON - In a big victory for President Bush, the Senate voted yesterday to allow him to negotiate trade deals that Congress could accept or reject but not amend. Bush has called such presidential authority vital to America's economy. The bill, which has passed the House and awaits Bush's signature, will revive a power that presidents wielded for two decades before it lapsed eight years ago. It had been stalled in Congress ever since. The margin was a comfortable 64-34, with 20 Democrats joining 43 Republicans and one independent in favor.
BUSINESS
By Mick Rood and Mick Rood,States News Service | September 13, 1990
WASHINGTON -- About 100 apparel workers from the Baltimore area joined thousands of textile workers, textile officials and farmers in a lobbying blitzkrieg here yesterday to push passage of a bill that would limit imports of textiles and textile products to 1 percent annual growth.The House of Representatives is expected to debate the bill next week in the face of a Bush administration pledge to veto it. The Senate approved a similar measure last July by a seemingly veto-proof margin of 68-32.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | August 25, 1992
BALTIMOREANS whose memories span the 1930s through the early 1970s will remember Jacob J. ("Jake") Edelman as a scholarly, dapper (always the handkerchief in the lapel pocket), silver-haired labor lawyer and articulate city councilman who for some 30 years brought light to that often-benighted body.Edelman was born just before the turn of the century in Rovno, Russia. He came here at age 13, penniless. But with the help of two sisters already here, he soon had a job as a clothing cutter for the H. Sonneborn Co. Sonneborn was one of the industry giants; it occupied the entire 15-story building at Paca and Pratt (which is still standing)
NEWS
September 23, 2006
Joe Glazer, 88, a singer-songwriter who rallied union loyalists and sympathizers, died Tuesday at his Chevy Chase home of non-Hodgkins lymphoma. Mr. Glazer, often called Labor's Troubadour, sang songs of solidarity on picket lines and union halls in almost every state. He also performed for many liberal politicians; in 1980, President Jimmy Carter invited him to play at the White House. He recorded more than 30 albums, wrote a book about labor music, recorded the songs of others and helped recruit a new generation of protest singers.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | January 18, 1995
The Kmart Corp. yesterday stripped its chairman, Joseph E. Antonini, of that title and gave it to one of the more outspoken board members, Donald S. Perkins.At a news conference at the company's headquarters in Troy, Mich., Mr. Perkins said that while he would spend about one-third of his time on Kmart business, Mr. Antonini, who continues as the president and chief executive, would keep running Kmart's operations. Still, many analysts speculated that the events foreshadowed Mr. Antonini's eventual end at Kmart.
NEWS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | September 27, 1994
Bitter but resigned, factory workers at London Fog Corp. yesterday approved a contract that will keep a scaled-down Baltimore plant operating but close two others in Western Maryland and cut the pay of remaining workers.Yesterday's vote climaxed months of contentious on-again, off-again talks that had seen the company continually raise the stakes, finally putting the livelihood of 700 workers on the line.Faced with a total shutdown by the end of October, members of the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union voted 478-to-174 for the two-year agreement that preserved the jobs of 220 of them and improved severance for the rest.
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | July 22, 1991
Ethel Beaudoin, a stitcher for 30 years at John Roberts Clothing Co. in Biddeford, Maine, liked her work so much that in June she bought the company.Not by herself, of course. Beaudoin, also president of Local 667A, Amalgamated Clothing Textile Workers Union, is a founder of a new workers' corporation that saved the bankrupt company and the jobs of its 170 garment workers, 90 percent of them women.The takeover plans leave management in place, but union members such as Beaudoin are co-owners and members of the board under an employee stock ownership plan that takes effect at the end of the year.
BUSINESS
By Mick Rood and Mick Rood,States News Service | September 13, 1990
WASHINGTON -- About 100 apparel workers from the Baltimore area joined thousands of textile workers, textile officials and farmers in a lobbying blitzkrieg here yesterday to push passage of a bill that would limit imports of textiles and textile products to 1 percent annual growth.The House of Representatives is expected to debate the bill next week in the face of a Bush administration pledge to veto it. The Senate approved a similar measure last July by a seemingly veto-proof margin of 68-32.
NEWS
August 3, 1995
Sylvia Weinberger, 89, who used a sprinkling of matzo meal, a pinch of salt and moxie to turn chopped liver into a commercial success, died July 23 at a hospital in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. She lived in Boca Raton, Fla.Mrs. Weinberger started making chopped liver for a luncheonette she and her husband, Irving, opened in 1944 on the Grand Concourse in the Bronx. She ended up presiding over a $2 million-a-year operation as the proprietor of Mrs. Weinberg's Chopped Liver. She once said her name had been shortened because of typographical necessity when her first labels were printed: "My whole name wouldn't fit."
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | March 4, 1992
Gleneagles Inc., an 80-year-old clothing manufacturer, plans to close its doors by June, resulting in a loss of 300 jobs at its Towson and Bel Air operations, the company confirmed yesterday.However, company officials said they are working with the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers, which represents employees, to find a buyer for the operation, which primarily makes men's rainwear.Union officials were not available for comment.If no buyer is found, the company will begin dismissing workers May 1 said Richard L. Biegel, president of Gleneagles.
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