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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | March 21, 2008
Ursula N. McCracken, former director of the Textile Museum in Washington who earlier had been director of development at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland, died Monday of brain cancer at her West University Parkway home. She was 66. Ursula Naylor Eland was born in New York City, and raised in England and Stamford, Conn. She earned a bachelor's degree in the history of art from Wellesley College in 1963 and received two master's degrees from Johns Hopkins University. Mrs. McCracken received a master's degree in the history of ideas in 1984 and, two years later, a master's in administrative sciences, or nonprofit management.
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NEWS
By TIM SMITH | June 9, 2009
If three's a trend, we've got a new one around here - performing Gounod's iconic opera Faust. Between this weekend and November, the Baltimore/Washington area will witness no less than three presentations of the work. What are the odds of that? Faust, which contains some of the most popular arias in the repertoire, tells the Goethe-based tale of the scholar who sells his soul to Mephistopheles in exchange for eternal youth and a beautiful woman. First up is what is billed as a "fully staged shortened version" by Opera Camerata of Washington, with chorus and orchestra, at La Maison Francaise, a.k.a.
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FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2004
When Helen Delich Bentley, the former Maryland congresswoman and journalist, cleans out her closets, museums take notice. Curators working for the American Textile History Museum in Massachusetts descended this week on Bentley's Lutherville home, combing for days through the racks and racks of clothes, shoes and hats the political powerhouse had amassed over the years. In the family room, there were racks of heavy wool suits by American designer Pauline TrigM-hre and intricate evening dresses by Oscar de la Renta.
NEWS
April 6, 2008
Ursula Naylor Eland family and friends will hold a gathering of remembrance from 2:00 to 4:00 pm, May 10th at The Textile Museum, Washington DC. Ursula requested contributions to the American Pain Foundation, Suite 710, 201 N. Charles St. Baltimore, MD 21201-4111 or the Textile Society of America, P.O. Box 193, Middletown, DE 19709.
TRAVEL
January 14, 2007
Istanbul is a beautiful city and the Blue Mosque is one of its most spectacular sites. I traveled to Turkey last October and took this photo from the terrace of a textile museum. As I focused on the dome, a huge flock of seagulls filled the lens. We saw the mosque from other vantage points several more times during our trip, but never again with a bird in sight. Penney Hubbard, Baltimore
NEWS
April 6, 2008
Ursula Naylor Eland family and friends will hold a gathering of remembrance from 2:00 to 4:00 pm, May 10th at The Textile Museum, Washington DC. Ursula requested contributions to the American Pain Foundation, Suite 710, 201 N. Charles St. Baltimore, MD 21201-4111 or the Textile Society of America, P.O. Box 193, Middletown, DE 19709.
TRAVEL
By [LORI SEARS] | January 28, 2007
The red zone You'll be seeing red at the Textile Museum in Washington. The new exhibit Red, on display Friday-July 8, will blanket the museum with red textiles and photographs and will showcase the many uses and meanings of the bold color in clothing and fabrics around the globe and throughout the ages. Textiles on view come from the museum's collection of about 17,000 items and include a 6th-century Egyptian fragment, a 19th-century Navajo rug, a 1970s Halston ball gown, the current self-portrait tapestry Tommy USA by Thomas Cronenberg (shown at right)
FEATURES
By Christine Temin and Christine Temin,BOSTON GLOBE | May 11, 1997
It's rare to find an American dress from the 18th or early 19th century in a size to fit an older child. Larger children's clothes were routinely made smaller and passed down to younger siblings. Even elaborately sewn adult garments of the era often carried the ghosts of previous incarnations -- traces of once-crisp folds and lines left from long-gone stitching. Cloth was costly, partly because it was imported, generally from England.By the late 19th century, though, the printed cotton industry in the United States was turning out enough fabric each year to make 17 dresses for every female in the nation.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | May 26, 1991
It seems that everyone who was planning an event last winter looked at their calendars, pointed to the first weekend in June and said, "This is it."And so for this coming weekend, we have the Charles Village Garden Walk; the annual open house at the Textile Museum in Washington; the Demuth Foundation Garden Tour in Lancaster, Pa.; an herb festival and garden party in Darlington; and a craft show and garden festival at Alloway Gardens in Littlestown, Pa.The...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | March 21, 2008
Ursula N. McCracken, former director of the Textile Museum in Washington who earlier had been director of development at the College of Notre Dame of Maryland, died Monday of brain cancer at her West University Parkway home. She was 66. Ursula Naylor Eland was born in New York City, and raised in England and Stamford, Conn. She earned a bachelor's degree in the history of art from Wellesley College in 1963 and received two master's degrees from Johns Hopkins University. Mrs. McCracken received a master's degree in the history of ideas in 1984 and, two years later, a master's in administrative sciences, or nonprofit management.
TRAVEL
By [LORI SEARS] | January 28, 2007
The red zone You'll be seeing red at the Textile Museum in Washington. The new exhibit Red, on display Friday-July 8, will blanket the museum with red textiles and photographs and will showcase the many uses and meanings of the bold color in clothing and fabrics around the globe and throughout the ages. Textiles on view come from the museum's collection of about 17,000 items and include a 6th-century Egyptian fragment, a 19th-century Navajo rug, a 1970s Halston ball gown, the current self-portrait tapestry Tommy USA by Thomas Cronenberg (shown at right)
TRAVEL
January 14, 2007
Istanbul is a beautiful city and the Blue Mosque is one of its most spectacular sites. I traveled to Turkey last October and took this photo from the terrace of a textile museum. As I focused on the dome, a huge flock of seagulls filled the lens. We saw the mosque from other vantage points several more times during our trip, but never again with a bird in sight. Penney Hubbard, Baltimore
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 15, 2005
Sprinkled around Washington's Dupont Circle neighborhood are some of the city's lesser-known museums. They are not lesser museums, by any means. But it is difficult to stand out in the shadow of the Smithsonian. So these institutions go about their daily business, relatively unnoticed by the packs of tourists that crowd the city's other museums. The staffs of these collections are far from alone, however. Residents from the area learned long ago the joys of walking through the Dupont Circle neighborhood, meandering among the embassies, art galleries and private homes, to stop and visit these small gems.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2004
When Helen Delich Bentley, the former Maryland congresswoman and journalist, cleans out her closets, museums take notice. Curators working for the American Textile History Museum in Massachusetts descended this week on Bentley's Lutherville home, combing for days through the racks and racks of clothes, shoes and hats the political powerhouse had amassed over the years. In the family room, there were racks of heavy wool suits by American designer Pauline TrigM-hre and intricate evening dresses by Oscar de la Renta.
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