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NEWS
December 9, 2007
As reported Dec. 12, 1948, in The Sun: Between twelve and fifteen thousand adults and children swamped the little town of Savage, Howard County yesterday for a glimpse of Santa Claus's future home in Maryland. They came as the guests of Harry H. Heim, a Baltimorean who purchased the town's main industry -- a 150 year-old textile mill -- last August and converted it to the manufacture of Christmas ornaments. As Governor Lane said: "We hope to provide a home in Maryland permanently for Santa Claus so he won't have to go back to the North Pole."
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NEWS
Jacques Kelly | July 6, 2012
No matter how many times I passed this Jones Falls Valley landmark, the Mount Vernon Mill seemed ancient, frighteningly off-limits and more than a little mysterious. With its massive brick walls and heavy features, the textile mill was a grim industrial workhouse. I often thought of the hands toiling long at a dangerous job. Early this year, a veteran Baltimore developer, David Tufaro, and his daughter, Jennifer Nolley, initiated a $40 million restoration-conversion with what promises to be a dazzling piece of environmental design.
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NEWS
October 29, 1997
THE SAVAGE MILL looks like a worthwhile investment of private and public money after all.Not too long ago, the partnership that transformed this early 19th-century textile mill into a retail center for arts and antiques appeared to be in serious trouble.The Savage Mill Limited Partnership had filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Its state and county loans of some $900,000 appeared to be in jeopardy.It would have been unfortunate had the enterprise failed. The shopping center had become a pleasant place to shop and browse.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2011
Charles Wagandt is waiting patiently. When he stepped up nearly 40 years ago to help rescue a town whose very existence was being threatened, recession certainly wasn't on his mind. But now, the nation's sluggish economy is his primary foe as he waits for the downturn to lift so he can finally complete his promise to Oella. For his decades-long efforts to breathe new life into the historic village that dates to 1808, Wagandt was named one of four 2011 Preservationists of the Year last week by Preservation Howard County.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | December 24, 1992
Most retail developers would love to have Jay Winer's problem.Mr. Winer, the developer of the Savage Mill, has learned that some customers have complained they don't have enough time to explore all the craft, art and antique stores at the complex in one day.To accommodate shoppers and attract new business to the mill, Mr. Winer is planning to build an inn and conference center on the last remaining 4-acre piece of property at the site.And while he's at it, he hopes to renovate the mill's old wheel house and boiler house, which have deteriorated over the years.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | March 29, 1991
A development team headed by Jay Winer has obtained financing to begin construction of the third and final phase of historic Savage Mill, the antiques- and crafts-oriented retail complex that is being created inside a former textile mill in Howard County.Gov. William Donald Schaefer announced that a $2.1 million financing package has been approved for the project and that work will begin next month. Part of the package is a $600,000 loan provided by the Howard County Office of Economic Development through the Maryland Industrial and Commercial Redevelopment Fund.
NEWS
By Jack W.Germond and Jules Witcover | February 4, 1992
Manchester,N.H. -- THE SCENE IN a spacious, vacant floor of an old textile mill as Vice President Dan Quayle spoke here the other day was a familiar one to all who have seen the striking television ad of Sen. Tom Harkin, competing in the Feb. 18 Democratic primary.In a similar textile mill, Senator Harkin is seen arguing how the economic policies of President Bush have led to the closing of such once-thriving plants.So there was a certain irony in the choice of Mr. Quayle's schedulers to bring him to this symbol of New Hampshire's decline to tout Mr. Bush's remedy.
NEWS
By Jody Vilschick and Jody Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 9, 2001
As you sit in Savage Mill Cafe tucked in the New Weave Building of Savage Mill, you can't help but be conscious of the buildings' historic origins. In 1820, Amos Williams and his three brothers received a loan from their friend John Savage to start a textile weaving business on the banks of the Little Patuxent River. Savage Mill - named after their generous friend - functioned as a textile mill from 1822 through 1947. "I love being here," says cafe owner Ryan Belen, who was born and reared in Istanbul, Turkey.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | July 6, 2012
No matter how many times I passed this Jones Falls Valley landmark, the Mount Vernon Mill seemed ancient, frighteningly off-limits and more than a little mysterious. With its massive brick walls and heavy features, the textile mill was a grim industrial workhouse. I often thought of the hands toiling long at a dangerous job. Early this year, a veteran Baltimore developer, David Tufaro, and his daughter, Jennifer Nolley, initiated a $40 million restoration-conversion with what promises to be a dazzling piece of environmental design.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2011
Charles Wagandt is waiting patiently. When he stepped up nearly 40 years ago to help rescue a town whose very existence was being threatened, recession certainly wasn't on his mind. But now, the nation's sluggish economy is his primary foe as he waits for the downturn to lift so he can finally complete his promise to Oella. For his decades-long efforts to breathe new life into the historic village that dates to 1808, Wagandt was named one of four 2011 Preservationists of the Year last week by Preservation Howard County.
NEWS
December 9, 2007
As reported Dec. 12, 1948, in The Sun: Between twelve and fifteen thousand adults and children swamped the little town of Savage, Howard County yesterday for a glimpse of Santa Claus's future home in Maryland. They came as the guests of Harry H. Heim, a Baltimorean who purchased the town's main industry -- a 150 year-old textile mill -- last August and converted it to the manufacture of Christmas ornaments. As Governor Lane said: "We hope to provide a home in Maryland permanently for Santa Claus so he won't have to go back to the North Pole."
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2002
In 65 years of living in Oella, Shirley Mellor has seen the historic village survive three floods and weather the 1972 closing of the woolen mill that employed her, her parents and much of the community. Now Oella is poised to take on a new challenge. This month, the Baltimore County zoning commissioner approved Forest City Residential Group's proposal to transform the 194-year-old mill from an eclectic collection of art studios and antique shops into 175 luxury apartments that would rent for as much as $3,000 per month.
NEWS
By Jody Vilschick and Jody Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 9, 2001
As you sit in Savage Mill Cafe tucked in the New Weave Building of Savage Mill, you can't help but be conscious of the buildings' historic origins. In 1820, Amos Williams and his three brothers received a loan from their friend John Savage to start a textile weaving business on the banks of the Little Patuxent River. Savage Mill - named after their generous friend - functioned as a textile mill from 1822 through 1947. "I love being here," says cafe owner Ryan Belen, who was born and reared in Istanbul, Turkey.
NEWS
January 13, 2000
Lawrence L. Heffner, a retired chemical engineer who invented a treatment that retarded flame from spreading on canvas tents, died Sunday at Genesis Elder Care in Brooklandville. He was 87 and had lived in Crofton and Sudbrook Park. He was chief chemist at William E. Hooper and Sons textile mills in Woodberry from 1933 to 1958. During that time, he patented a treatment for cotton-duck canvas that curbed fire and mildew. The process was widely used by the armed forces during World War II and by the Ringling Brothers circus.
NEWS
October 29, 1997
THE SAVAGE MILL looks like a worthwhile investment of private and public money after all.Not too long ago, the partnership that transformed this early 19th-century textile mill into a retail center for arts and antiques appeared to be in serious trouble.The Savage Mill Limited Partnership had filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Its state and county loans of some $900,000 appeared to be in jeopardy.It would have been unfortunate had the enterprise failed. The shopping center had become a pleasant place to shop and browse.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | December 24, 1992
Most retail developers would love to have Jay Winer's problem.Mr. Winer, the developer of the Savage Mill, has learned that some customers have complained they don't have enough time to explore all the craft, art and antique stores at the complex in one day.To accommodate shoppers and attract new business to the mill, Mr. Winer is planning to build an inn and conference center on the last remaining 4-acre piece of property at the site.And while he's at it, he hopes to renovate the mill's old wheel house and boiler house, which have deteriorated over the years.
NEWS
January 13, 2000
Lawrence L. Heffner, a retired chemical engineer who invented a treatment that retarded flame from spreading on canvas tents, died Sunday at Genesis Elder Care in Brooklandville. He was 87 and had lived in Crofton and Sudbrook Park. He was chief chemist at William E. Hooper and Sons textile mills in Woodberry from 1933 to 1958. During that time, he patented a treatment for cotton-duck canvas that curbed fire and mildew. The process was widely used by the armed forces during World War II and by the Ringling Brothers circus.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2002
In 65 years of living in Oella, Shirley Mellor has seen the historic village survive three floods and weather the 1972 closing of the woolen mill that employed her, her parents and much of the community. Now Oella is poised to take on a new challenge. This month, the Baltimore County zoning commissioner approved Forest City Residential Group's proposal to transform the 194-year-old mill from an eclectic collection of art studios and antique shops into 175 luxury apartments that would rent for as much as $3,000 per month.
NEWS
By Jack W.Germond and Jules Witcover | February 4, 1992
Manchester,N.H. -- THE SCENE IN a spacious, vacant floor of an old textile mill as Vice President Dan Quayle spoke here the other day was a familiar one to all who have seen the striking television ad of Sen. Tom Harkin, competing in the Feb. 18 Democratic primary.In a similar textile mill, Senator Harkin is seen arguing how the economic policies of President Bush have led to the closing of such once-thriving plants.So there was a certain irony in the choice of Mr. Quayle's schedulers to bring him to this symbol of New Hampshire's decline to tout Mr. Bush's remedy.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | March 29, 1991
A development team headed by Jay Winer has obtained financing to begin construction of the third and final phase of historic Savage Mill, the antiques- and crafts-oriented retail complex that is being created inside a former textile mill in Howard County.Gov. William Donald Schaefer announced that a $2.1 million financing package has been approved for the project and that work will begin next month. Part of the package is a $600,000 loan provided by the Howard County Office of Economic Development through the Maryland Industrial and Commercial Redevelopment Fund.
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