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By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 7, 2005
WASHINGTON - The U.S. textile industry petitioned the Bush administration yesterday to impose limits on imports of knit shirts, brassieres, pants and other clothing from China, saying a surge in those imports endangers their industry. The petition, which affects products that accounted for $1.45 billion in imports last year, follows by two days a decision by the U.S. Commerce Department to initiate investigations of three categories of Chinese apparel, including cotton trousers and underwear.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts | March 19, 2009
Baltimore's Contemporary Museum at 100 W. Centre St. will be transformed into an environmental think tank and laboratory when the Futurefarmers art collective from San Francisco opens The Reverse Ark: In the Wake, an exhibit exploring the social, historical and environmental history of the city's mills and textile industry, running March 26 to Aug. 22. Using the concept of an "ark" as a place of preservation and exploration, Futurefarmers will work with...
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 16, 2001
WILMINGTON, Del. - Burlington Industries Inc., once the world's largest textile maker, filed yesterday for bankruptcy protection after competition from low-cost Asian imports eroded profits and left it saddled with debt. Burlington follows rivals Thomaston Mills Inc. and Worldtex Inc., which sought bankruptcy protection from creditors this year as foreign competition and declining sales continued to claim U.S. fabric makers. Burlington, based in Greensboro, N.C., listed $1.18 billion in assets and $1.1 billion in debts in its Chapter 11 petition filed in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Wilmington, Del. J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. will provide Burlington with a $190 million credit line while it reorganizes operations and cuts debt.
NEWS
By Robert M. Hathaway and Edward Gresser | September 26, 2008
Seven months ago, Pakistanis hoped elections would usher in a brighter era. Instead, skies are darkening. As President Asif Ali Zardari visited the United Nations and met with President Bush this week, Pakistan watchers worried that simultaneous political and economic crises are pushing the country toward disaster. In response, both the administration and its Democratic critics advocate a new round of foreign aid increases. But past aid increases have failed to achieve results. If we expect different results, we need a different approach: an economic policy built upon trade and job creation for Pakistan's people, not just aid to its soldiers and ministries.
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 8, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Defense Secretary Dick Cheney and Gen. Colin L. Powell, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, came under sharp interrogation yesterday -- over why the mail takes so long to get to the Persian Gulf and why some troops aren't yet outfitted with proper desert fatigues."
NEWS
By Myron E. Ullman 3rd | December 10, 1993
CAVEAT emptor -- let the buyer beware -- was once the guiding principle for shoppers. Those days are long gone, but the attitude has apparently not disappeared from U.S. trade policy.The Clinton administration is pushing for a concession in the Uruguay round of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, which ends next week, that would inflate U.S. consumer prices on imported clothing and textiles for the next 15 years.While most consumers don't realize it, they pay $46 billion a year to subsidize U.S. textile and apparel producers -- more than $700 per family.
TRAVEL
By LORI SEARS | May 28, 2006
`Celebration of Textiles' Next weekend, visitors to the Textile Museum in Washington, D.C., can gain a new appreciation of the textile industry - beyond just touring the museum. Beginning Saturday, the museum presents its 28th annual "Celebration of Textiles," featuring hands-on activities, artist demonstrations, sheep-shearing in the gardens (Saturday only), tours of exhibits and more. Visitors can talk with local fiber artists and watch as they spin, weave and knit. Folks can try out a variety of looms, including a Braille-type loom for blind weavers.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | February 29, 2004
IN ONE OF THE MOST poignant parts of his highly praised stump speech, North Carolina Sen. John Edwards refers to his roots in the area of the country where the textile industry once provided thousands of jobs. "This is very personal for me," Edwards says. "I grew up in a family where my father worked in a mill. I saw what happened when that mill closed, to my own community and to the families who were involved." The villain in this scenario is often trade policies, blamed for making it easy to export the jobs of textile workers.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | November 17, 2002
PAKISTAN had hoped, once American midterm elections were over, that the United States might move a little closer toward keeping its promises. In return for basically commandeering the country in the war against al-Qaida, Washington had hinted at broad trade rewards, including increased U.S. patronage of the critical Pakistani textile industry. Under heavy U.S. pressure, Islamabad let American forces use its airspace and military bases and reversed its support of Afghanistan's Taliban regime, enraging radical Islamists far and near.
BUSINESS
By William Neikirk and William Neikirk,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 13, 2005
WASHINGTON - Imports of expensive oil and cheap textiles helped drive the U.S. trade deficit to a record $61 billion in February, the government said yesterday, as America's ravenous appetite for foreign goods showed no signs of abating. Economists expressed concern about the trade deficit's surprise worsening from January's trade gap of $58.5 billion. As a result of the new numbers, many economists lowered their projections for first-quarter economic growth. The Commerce Department said the United States exported $100.
TRAVEL
By LORI SEARS | May 28, 2006
`Celebration of Textiles' Next weekend, visitors to the Textile Museum in Washington, D.C., can gain a new appreciation of the textile industry - beyond just touring the museum. Beginning Saturday, the museum presents its 28th annual "Celebration of Textiles," featuring hands-on activities, artist demonstrations, sheep-shearing in the gardens (Saturday only), tours of exhibits and more. Visitors can talk with local fiber artists and watch as they spin, weave and knit. Folks can try out a variety of looms, including a Braille-type loom for blind weavers.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 31, 2005
ULAN BATOR, Mongolia - For proof that China's surging textile exports to the United States this year have been putting people out of work, look no further than the rows of unmanned sewing machines in Zheng Chenli's shut-down factory - in Mongolia. Zheng's MCX garment factory was one of about 80 textile plants owned or partially financed by foreigners, including more than 20 plants financed by entrepreneurs from China, that operated here for years, solely to get around quotas that capped China's exports of clothing to the United States.
BUSINESS
By William Neikirk and William Neikirk,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 13, 2005
WASHINGTON - Imports of expensive oil and cheap textiles helped drive the U.S. trade deficit to a record $61 billion in February, the government said yesterday, as America's ravenous appetite for foreign goods showed no signs of abating. Economists expressed concern about the trade deficit's surprise worsening from January's trade gap of $58.5 billion. As a result of the new numbers, many economists lowered their projections for first-quarter economic growth. The Commerce Department said the United States exported $100.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 7, 2005
WASHINGTON - The U.S. textile industry petitioned the Bush administration yesterday to impose limits on imports of knit shirts, brassieres, pants and other clothing from China, saying a surge in those imports endangers their industry. The petition, which affects products that accounted for $1.45 billion in imports last year, follows by two days a decision by the U.S. Commerce Department to initiate investigations of three categories of Chinese apparel, including cotton trousers and underwear.
BUSINESS
By James P. Miller and James P. Miller,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 23, 2004
International Steel Group founder Wilbur L. Ross has always favored bargain-basement deals. But the financier's newest acquisition literally operates underground. After assembling the nation's biggest steel company from the ruins of bankrupt and near-bankrupt U.S. steelmakers, including Bethlehem Steel Corp., Ross shifted gears and bought some troubled U.S. textile-makers. Now he is buying distressed assets in another industrial commodity, coal. This month, an investing group led by Ross paid $786 million for the assets of Horizon Natural Resources Co. of Ashland, Ky., which was undergoing bankruptcy proceedings a second time.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | February 29, 2004
IN ONE OF THE MOST poignant parts of his highly praised stump speech, North Carolina Sen. John Edwards refers to his roots in the area of the country where the textile industry once provided thousands of jobs. "This is very personal for me," Edwards says. "I grew up in a family where my father worked in a mill. I saw what happened when that mill closed, to my own community and to the families who were involved." The villain in this scenario is often trade policies, blamed for making it easy to export the jobs of textile workers.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Gettleman and Jeffrey Gettleman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 3, 2002
MARTINSVILLE, Va. - Some people climb mountains. Margaret Blankenship has sewn one - out of sweat pants, 21,565,440 pairs of them, to be exact. Every workday for the past 36 years, the bundles of fuzzy cotton kept coming and Blankenship kept stitching, making more sweat pants along the line at the VF Imagewear factory than anybody in company history. But recently she got laid off. VF is ceasing operations here, the latest in a long list of Southern textile mills to succumb to the pull of globalization.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 31, 2005
ULAN BATOR, Mongolia - For proof that China's surging textile exports to the United States this year have been putting people out of work, look no further than the rows of unmanned sewing machines in Zheng Chenli's shut-down factory - in Mongolia. Zheng's MCX garment factory was one of about 80 textile plants owned or partially financed by foreigners, including more than 20 plants financed by entrepreneurs from China, that operated here for years, solely to get around quotas that capped China's exports of clothing to the United States.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 24, 2003
QINGDAO, China - Row after row of young women, most of them farmers' daughters, sit every working day in the Qingdao Nannan Co. factory, stitching together with assembly-line determination thousands of bras destined for the U.S. market for $3 to $4 a day, comfortably more than their parents make. But in the same factory are rows of vacant desks with sewing machines draped in plastic, the work stations of employees laid off in recent months. The workers and officials at Qingdao Nannan, China's third-largest exporter of bras to the United States, are learning a difficult lesson in U.S.-China trade politics.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | November 17, 2002
PAKISTAN had hoped, once American midterm elections were over, that the United States might move a little closer toward keeping its promises. In return for basically commandeering the country in the war against al-Qaida, Washington had hinted at broad trade rewards, including increased U.S. patronage of the critical Pakistani textile industry. Under heavy U.S. pressure, Islamabad let American forces use its airspace and military bases and reversed its support of Afghanistan's Taliban regime, enraging radical Islamists far and near.
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