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NEWS
January 10, 2010
All textbooks recommended for first-time use in Howard County public schools will be on display from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays through Tuesday in the lobby at the Department of Education, 10910 Route 108 in Ellicott City. Forms for approval or requests for re-evaluation of any of the proposed materials will be available. Call 410-313-5634 for more information.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
Holding a whiteboard, the University of Maryland, College Park students scrawled their complaints and posed for a picture. "My name is Justin and I spent $114 on ONE textbook," a student wrote. "My name is Jeff and I spent $736 on textbooks," wrote another. The images, posted online by the Student Government Association in recent months, are designed to highlight the rapid rise in the price of college textbooks over the past decade. This semester, the University System of Maryland is exploring ways to bring that cost to zero with "open-source" electronic textbooks — the latest experiment in changing the way students in Maryland and across the nation are taught.
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NEWS
November 17, 2011
It's about time The Sun reported on the millions of dollars spent on unused textbooks in the Baltimore County school system ("Officials question millions spent on Balto. Co. tests and curriculum," Nov. 12). This is something that has been going on for a long time. I retired as a classroom teacher and mentor for Baltimore County in 2001. While in my last position, mentors often discussed the many books on various ability levels and subjects that were left in their original packaging in the book room.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | October 23, 2013
Despite opposition from one of its board members, the Baltimore County school board approved a 10-year, $15.7 million contract Tuesday night for language arts textbooks. The new textbook series published by McGraw-Hill Education is for grades one through five, and will cost $4.7 million this year. In addition, the board gave its approval for additional expenditures to buy more of the digital and printed materials over the next decade. School board member Michael Collins was the lone dissenter, saying he believed the purchase was premature because the school system has not yet completed writing the curriculum.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Sun Staff Writer | November 27, 1994
Lori Gray hid her social studies book in her bedroom closet rather than take it to class: The 11-year-old, in seventh grade at Marley Middle School, was ashamed of the way it looked."
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2014
Holding a whiteboard, the University of Maryland, College Park students scrawled their complaints and posed for a picture. "My name is Justin and I spent $114 on ONE textbook," a student wrote. "My name is Jeff and I spent $736 on textbooks," wrote another. The images, posted online by the Student Government Association in recent months, are designed to highlight the rapid rise in the price of college textbooks over the past decade. This semester, the University System of Maryland is exploring ways to bring that cost to zero with "open-source" electronic textbooks — the latest experiment in changing the way students in Maryland and across the nation are taught.
EXPLORE
January 26, 2012
ANNAPOLIS - A bill being sponsored by eight Republicans in the House of Delegates to exempt college textbooks from the sales tax had its first hearing this past week in Annapolis. House Bill 38 calls for no sales tax on textbooks purchased in Maryland by part- or full-time students attending a college or university. It's initial hearing was held Jan. 25. "The price of textbooks of $500 for a semester is not unusual, and this is a tremendous burden, especially on middle-income families," said Del. Wade Kach, who represents District 5B and is a co-sponsor of the bill.
NEWS
By Bill Tammeus | April 1, 1992
ERRORS have been creeping into the school history textbooks American children use.The people who run schools, in response, have been demanding that textbook publishers correct their mistakes.This is a terrible situation, requiring eternal vigilance as the price of accuracy, and I am prepared to help. After all, I have devoted my journalistic career to the pursuit of accuracy -- or at least to not making up more facts than I have to.To help you evaluate the veracity of what you find in textbooks, I have drawn up an incomplete but instructive list of information to be suspicious of if you run across it in a book.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | December 22, 1991
Woe to Carroll's social studies, political science and geography teachers.These are turbulent times we live in. With events changing daily in the Soviet Union (not to mention elsewhere in the world), teachers have had to discard long-used textbooks and maps for more up-to-date materials.The day-to-day changes have made the district's textbooks and teaching guides obsolete. And there's no point buying new textbooks and maps until life in the Soviet Union becomes stable.Consider the dilemma for educators.
NEWS
By James J. Kilpatrick | December 11, 1990
Washington.-- LYNNE CHENEY said a mouthful last month. To be sure, it was a mouthful many others have voiced before, but as chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, she speaks from a prestigious rostrum. Listen in:''Many of the textbooks used in American schools are so dull that no one would read them voluntarily. We continue to teach reading with basal readers that make the very idea of books seem boring. We continue to teach history with textbooks that drain all drama out of the past.
NEWS
May 8, 2013
As a taxpayer and a voter, I am sick and tired of government agencies that do not get audited every year when they are spending my money. After working in the private sector for 45 years and having the ability to spend company money, I know how important it is to be accountable when spending others' money. Why is it OK for these government agencies not to have the same respect for my money? Joe Heming
NEWS
March 11, 2013
Here's a quiz for all current and future college students and their families: Which of the following has risen in price the most sharply over the last several decades - tuition, health care, the consumer price index or textbooks? For the correct answer, please consult the back of your texts. Since 1978, the cost of college textbooks has risen 812 percent, according to the American Enterprise Institute. Few necessities can match that kind of price explosion. In 2011, the cost of college texts rose 8 percent, or more than four times the rate of inflation, according to U.S. Labor Department statistics.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2013
Reading in Thursday's post that few journalism programs offer much training in editing, Sean Smyth asked, "What is the best training to be an editor?" There are things you can do to prepare yourself to be an editor, the best of which is to read widely and acquire as broad a store of general knowledge as you can. It is through wide reading that you acquaint yourself with the kinds of prose, good and bad, that are past and current. It is through wide reading that you come to recognize allusions and cliches.
EXPLORE
January 26, 2012
ANNAPOLIS - A bill being sponsored by eight Republicans in the House of Delegates to exempt college textbooks from the sales tax had its first hearing this past week in Annapolis. House Bill 38 calls for no sales tax on textbooks purchased in Maryland by part- or full-time students attending a college or university. It's initial hearing was held Jan. 25. "The price of textbooks of $500 for a semester is not unusual, and this is a tremendous burden, especially on middle-income families," said Del. Wade Kach, who represents District 5B and is a co-sponsor of the bill.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2011
Saying that money had been wasted and school system policies had not been followed in the purchases of books and writing of curriculum, Baltimore County school board members asked administrators Tuesday night for reassurances that similar mistakes would not be made in the future. The school board's questions came after reports in The Baltimore Sun this month that detailed the school system's spending of millions of dollars to rewrite language arts curriculum that has been shelved and to purchase a 27-year-old grammar textbook that sat in a warehouse for nearly a year before being distributed recently.
NEWS
November 17, 2011
It's about time The Sun reported on the millions of dollars spent on unused textbooks in the Baltimore County school system ("Officials question millions spent on Balto. Co. tests and curriculum," Nov. 12). This is something that has been going on for a long time. I retired as a classroom teacher and mentor for Baltimore County in 2001. While in my last position, mentors often discussed the many books on various ability levels and subjects that were left in their original packaging in the book room.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,Sun Columnist | January 21, 2007
Colleges and state legislatures across the country have been grappling with a problem that's not going away: the soaring price of textbooks. Last year, 21 states, including Maryland, considered legislation or policies to rein in book costs, according to the National Association of College Stores. And at least in Maryland, the issue will be coming up again this year. Two years ago, the Maryland legislature asked the university system to come up with a consortium through which public institutions, on a voluntary basis, could use their buying power to get lower prices on books.
NEWS
November 15, 2011
I was quoted in Liz Bowie's recent article on Baltimore County's ill-advised textbook purchase ("Millions for textbooks that went used," Nov. 11) and would like to supplement those remarks. Superintendent Joe A. Hairston ignored the advice of the Maryland State Department of Education and wasted $5 million of taxpayer money on obsolete textbooks. That's money the county schools could have used to retain many great teachers who were laid off last year, That's $5 million the county could have used to avoid eliminating classes in many high schools.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2011
Baltimore County leaders expressed concern Friday that the school system may have wasted as much as $5 million on textbooks and a curriculum that are not being widely used, calling on school officials to more closely monitor spending. "When you find out that millions of dollars were directed toward textbooks that are sitting in a warehouse, that is a serious concern," said Donald Mohler, chief of staff for County Executive Kevin Kamenetz. "It is important that every dollar we spend be spent wisely.
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