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NEWS
June 27, 2011
Brendan Madigan's recommendation that Maryland follow the lead of Texas is quite interesting ("A Texas solution to Maryland Jobs," June 23). Is he aware that the "Texas miracle" has led to a budget deficit expected to run as high as $25 billion over the next two years? Or that, in response to this deficit, the Texas legislature approved a new budget with $15 billion in cuts, $4 billion of which will be from public education? As Barbara Bush wrote in an opinion piece in February of this year, "[Texas]
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NEWS
June 27, 2011
Brendan Madigan's recommendation that Maryland follow the lead of Texas is quite interesting ("A Texas solution to Maryland Jobs," June 23). Is he aware that the "Texas miracle" has led to a budget deficit expected to run as high as $25 billion over the next two years? Or that, in response to this deficit, the Texas legislature approved a new budget with $15 billion in cuts, $4 billion of which will be from public education? As Barbara Bush wrote in an opinion piece in February of this year, "[Texas]
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NEWS
June 25, 2011
Having just moved back to Maryland after 23 years in Dallas, I think I can bring some insight as to Texas' merits vs. Maryland. ("A Texas remedy for what ails Maryland jobs," June 22) First, there is the myth that Texas is cheaper to live in than other states. Go to any online cost-of-living calculator and you will find that the cost of living in Maryland is 4 percent to 4.5 percent less than living in Texas, even with the Maryland state income tax. If you earned $50,000 a year in Texas, you'd have an extra $20-$25 a week in your pocket simply by moving to Maryland.
NEWS
June 25, 2011
Having just moved back to Maryland after 23 years in Dallas, I think I can bring some insight as to Texas' merits vs. Maryland. ("A Texas remedy for what ails Maryland jobs," June 22) First, there is the myth that Texas is cheaper to live in than other states. Go to any online cost-of-living calculator and you will find that the cost of living in Maryland is 4 percent to 4.5 percent less than living in Texas, even with the Maryland state income tax. If you earned $50,000 a year in Texas, you'd have an extra $20-$25 a week in your pocket simply by moving to Maryland.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 15, 2000
AUSTIN, Texas - If President-elect George W. Bush's central message on Wednesday night was to promote healing and conciliation, the tonic he offered was bipartisanship, Texas-style. "Here, in a place where Democrats have the majority," Bush said from the podium of the Texas House of Representatives, "Republicans and Democrats have worked together to do what is right for the people we represent." The bipartisanship that Bush put on display Wednesday night when he chose the state's most powerful Democrat, House Speaker Pete Laney, is indeed genuine in the Texas Legislature.
NEWS
By DAVID G. SAVAGE and DAVID G. SAVAGE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 2, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Supreme Court justices signaled yesterday that they are likely to uphold the Texas redistricting plan engineered in 2003 by former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay. DeLay's plan gave the Republicans six more seats in the House of Representatives and helped lock in the GOP majority. But the plan was criticized for its brazenness, because district lines are usually drawn only once a decade after the new census shows how the population has shifted. Democrats and civil rights activists appealed to the high court in hopes of undoing DeLay's plan, alleging that what they termed a "partisan gerrymander" was unfair and threatened to poison politics in other states.
NEWS
By Ernest B. Furgurson | November 7, 1990
Washington. THIS WEEK, Louis Sullivan announced the government's latest dietary guidelines, urging that Americans eat more fruits and vegetables. Surprisingly, his audience did not ask whether he would prevail on his boss, the nation's premier role model, to start eating broccoli.People are kind to Dr. Sullivan, the secretary of Health and Human Services, because they understand that he must be embarrassed every day by the conflicts between his beliefs and his president's policies.Mr. Bush's well-publicized loathing for broccoli is the least of it, a personal quirk good for a few laughs and perhaps a few votes.
NEWS
By Brendan Madigan | June 22, 2011
A recent article in The Sun noted Maryland's dismal position as last in the nation in terms of the number of jobs created. Of the words that came to my mind, "shocked" was not one of them. Throughout my 2010 campaign for the office of state comptroller, I warned voters of this exact situation. The policies that have been a mainstay in Annapolis for decades have driven Maryland into a state of economic ruin. (And, just for the record, both Democrats and Republicans are to blame.) Throughout the campaign, I promoted a "Texas model" to spur economic growth here in Maryland.
NEWS
By WILLIAM BEAUCHAMP | January 4, 1992
Dallas -- Being gay in Texas is pure theater of the absurd. When I first moved to Dallas in 1974, I discovered that I was defined as a lawbreaker by statute 21.06 of the Texas Penal Code. Then, in 1982, 21.06 was overturned by a federal court: instant rehabilitation. But in August, 1985, a higher court overruled the lower one, and I was transformed overnight into a criminal once again. The Texas ''Nuremberg Law,'' similar to those in nearly half the other states, remained in force until December a year ago; it was overturned, this time by a state district court in Austin.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2011
A decades-old program to screen newborns for certain hereditary diseases could be at risk because parents across the country have grown concerned about what happens to the leftover blood, according to a Johns Hopkins researcher who has studied state laws. The states keep the samples, for years or decades, for laudable reasons, like research to improve the tests or studies into genetic disorders, said Dr. Michelle H. Lewis, research scholar at the Berman Institute's Genetics and Public Policy Center.
NEWS
By Brendan Madigan | June 22, 2011
A recent article in The Sun noted Maryland's dismal position as last in the nation in terms of the number of jobs created. Of the words that came to my mind, "shocked" was not one of them. Throughout my 2010 campaign for the office of state comptroller, I warned voters of this exact situation. The policies that have been a mainstay in Annapolis for decades have driven Maryland into a state of economic ruin. (And, just for the record, both Democrats and Republicans are to blame.) Throughout the campaign, I promoted a "Texas model" to spur economic growth here in Maryland.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2011
A decades-old program to screen newborns for certain hereditary diseases could be at risk because parents across the country have grown concerned about what happens to the leftover blood, according to a Johns Hopkins researcher who has studied state laws. The states keep the samples, for years or decades, for laudable reasons, like research to improve the tests or studies into genetic disorders, said Dr. Michelle H. Lewis, research scholar at the Berman Institute's Genetics and Public Policy Center.
NEWS
By DAVID G. SAVAGE and DAVID G. SAVAGE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 2, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Supreme Court justices signaled yesterday that they are likely to uphold the Texas redistricting plan engineered in 2003 by former House Majority Leader Tom DeLay. DeLay's plan gave the Republicans six more seats in the House of Representatives and helped lock in the GOP majority. But the plan was criticized for its brazenness, because district lines are usually drawn only once a decade after the new census shows how the population has shifted. Democrats and civil rights activists appealed to the high court in hopes of undoing DeLay's plan, alleging that what they termed a "partisan gerrymander" was unfair and threatened to poison politics in other states.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 15, 2000
AUSTIN, Texas - If President-elect George W. Bush's central message on Wednesday night was to promote healing and conciliation, the tonic he offered was bipartisanship, Texas-style. "Here, in a place where Democrats have the majority," Bush said from the podium of the Texas House of Representatives, "Republicans and Democrats have worked together to do what is right for the people we represent." The bipartisanship that Bush put on display Wednesday night when he chose the state's most powerful Democrat, House Speaker Pete Laney, is indeed genuine in the Texas Legislature.
NEWS
By WILLIAM BEAUCHAMP | January 4, 1992
Dallas -- Being gay in Texas is pure theater of the absurd. When I first moved to Dallas in 1974, I discovered that I was defined as a lawbreaker by statute 21.06 of the Texas Penal Code. Then, in 1982, 21.06 was overturned by a federal court: instant rehabilitation. But in August, 1985, a higher court overruled the lower one, and I was transformed overnight into a criminal once again. The Texas ''Nuremberg Law,'' similar to those in nearly half the other states, remained in force until December a year ago; it was overturned, this time by a state district court in Austin.
NEWS
By Ernest B. Furgurson | November 7, 1990
Washington. THIS WEEK, Louis Sullivan announced the government's latest dietary guidelines, urging that Americans eat more fruits and vegetables. Surprisingly, his audience did not ask whether he would prevail on his boss, the nation's premier role model, to start eating broccoli.People are kind to Dr. Sullivan, the secretary of Health and Human Services, because they understand that he must be embarrassed every day by the conflicts between his beliefs and his president's policies.Mr. Bush's well-publicized loathing for broccoli is the least of it, a personal quirk good for a few laughs and perhaps a few votes.
NEWS
March 31, 2014
In January, Rick Raemisch was brought shackled and handcuffed to a state penitentiary in Colorado and deposited in a 13-by-17-foot cell with nothing in it except a bed, toilet and sink screwed to the floor. His restraints were removed, the door slammed shut behind him and then he was alone. Mr. Raemisch had committed no crime. He was, in fact, the recently appointed head of Colorado's corrections department, and as he later wrote in a New York Times op-ed, he hoped that by putting himself in an inmate's place he might get "a better sense of what solitary confinement was like, and what it did to the prisoners who were housed there, sometimes for years.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 9, 2005
WASHINGTON - A Texas grand jury indicted a political action committee linked to House Majority Leader Tom DeLay yesterday, alleging that it accepted illegal campaign contributions during the 2002 election that led to a historic realignment of the Texas Legislature. The charges, which include separate indictments against one of the state's oldest and largest employer groups, arose out of an investigation by local prosecutors, begun more than two years ago, into the use of corporate money to bankroll Republican candidates for state office.
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