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NEWS
March 19, 2012
I imagine you are getting some negative responses to the Doonesbury cartoon strip so let me counter those by stating that I am glad you have chosen to run the current panels regarding a Texas law that requires women seeking an abortion to first undergo an ultrasound. Although Doonesbury creator Gary Trudeau can be controversial, he is dealing with an important issue in a manner that certainly draws attention, and the attempts by conservatives to make already unpleasant choices some women face more difficult and restrictive need to be countered.
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NEWS
By Brian Griffiths | January 30, 2014
The O'Malley administration made it a priority to protect the rights of those who have committed heinous crimes, been judged by a jury of their peers and sentenced to the ultimate punishment that can be levied against them. Why is protecting those who have been convicted and judged a higher priority than those who have yet to even be born? Last week during his final State of the State Address, Gov. Martin O'Malley made an interesting comment. He said: "Along the way, we have come together, time and again, to protect the dignity of every Marylander.
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NEWS
By Miguel Bustillo and Miguel Bustillo,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 31, 2007
HOUSTON -- Texas Gov. Rick Perry spared the life of death row inmate Kenneth Foster Jr. yesterday, just hours before he was to be executed for a murder he did not personally commit. Perry's decision to commute the death sentence of Foster, the getaway driver in a 1996 botched robbery that ended in a fatal shooting, came after the governor received a rare recommendation to do so from the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles. "After carefully considering the facts of this case, along with the recommendations from the Board of Pardons and Paroles, I believe the right and just decision is to commute Foster's sentence from the death penalty to life imprisonment," Perry said in a statement.
NEWS
August 5, 2013
U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder was right to tell the National Urban League last month that despite a Supreme Court ruling in July striking down a key provision of the Voting Rights Act, the Justice Department will still seek to block Texas and other states from changing their voting laws in ways that limit minorities' access to the polls. The short-sighted action by the court's conservative majority threatens to turn back the clock for millions of black and Hispanic voters in states with a past history of discrimination and demands a vigorous response from the Justice Department to protect the right to cast a ballot.
NEWS
June 27, 2003
BY STRIKING DOWN a Texas law banning gay sex acts, the Supreme Court has strengthened the protections of privacy for all. In the case before the court, county sheriffs had broken into an apartment looking for a suspect only to discover two men having sex in their bedroom. The men were arrested and later convicted. Under Texas law, if the officers had surprised a heterosexual couple in the same position, they would not have been charged with anything. But because they were men, these two consenting adults were arrested and forced to air their extremely personal business in a public courtroom.
NEWS
August 10, 2006
Tom DeLay has long warned of an "out-of-control judiciary" and now his fears have been realized. A series of judges clearly beyond his control - Republicans as well as Democrats, serving on the Texas state bench as well as federal courts - blocked what may be the former House majority leader's last political maneuver. The final blow came Monday, when Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, one of the court's most conservative members, refused to allow Mr. DeLay to replace himself on a Texas congressional ballot with a hand-picked successor.
NEWS
By Margie Burns | November 29, 2000
RECOUNT STATUTES should be liberally construed, to accomplish their purpose of determining the result of an election as evidenced by legal ballots." This principle is quoted from Corpus Juris Secundum, Vol. 29, Elections, the premier discussion of legal authority in American law. Its section on "Re-Examination and Recount of Ballots" runs 20 pages, with scores of cases footnoted. Even to a lay reader, the inference is inescapable that there is nothing unheard of about vote recounts in American elections.
NEWS
By Miguel Bustillo and Miguel Bustillo,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 26, 2007
PASADENA, Texas -- When he saw two men using a crowbar to enter his neighbor's house this month, Joe Horn did what many people would do: He called 911. But when police had not shown up by the time the men were about to leave, the 61-year-old retiree did something most people probably would not: He put down the phone, stepped outside with his shotgun and killed them. "I'm not going to let them get away with this," Horn told the 911 dispatcher, who responded: "Property's not worth killing someone over."
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2003
The first governor of the Massachusetts Colony famously envisioned a "city on a hill," but even in his idealism the governor noted the trouble with sex. Sex, John Winthrop lamented in his journals of the 1630s and 1640s, was everywhere, giving civil and church leaders reasons aplenty to punish "lewdness" and "incontinency." The country has long struggled with the reality of sex. The issue is almost always present. President Bush spoke yesterday against gay marriages, saying the administration was preparing legislation that would define marriage as a union between a man and woman.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | June 9, 1995
Brownsville, Texas -- I RECENTLY met some public school administrators here who are truly committed professionals. They oversee a school district of 40,000 children, the largest in "The Valley." I soon began to suspect, however, that they were not only educators but also magicians.Think of it this way: Illegal immigration in America is, well, illegal. Yet certain legal precedents and practices not only force American school districts to educate the children of illegal immigrants, but also forbid them from even daring to ask the children or their parents if they are U.S. citizens.
NEWS
March 19, 2012
I imagine you are getting some negative responses to the Doonesbury cartoon strip so let me counter those by stating that I am glad you have chosen to run the current panels regarding a Texas law that requires women seeking an abortion to first undergo an ultrasound. Although Doonesbury creator Gary Trudeau can be controversial, he is dealing with an important issue in a manner that certainly draws attention, and the attempts by conservatives to make already unpleasant choices some women face more difficult and restrictive need to be countered.
NEWS
By Miguel Bustillo and Miguel Bustillo,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 26, 2007
PASADENA, Texas -- When he saw two men using a crowbar to enter his neighbor's house this month, Joe Horn did what many people would do: He called 911. But when police had not shown up by the time the men were about to leave, the 61-year-old retiree did something most people probably would not: He put down the phone, stepped outside with his shotgun and killed them. "I'm not going to let them get away with this," Horn told the 911 dispatcher, who responded: "Property's not worth killing someone over."
NEWS
By Miguel Bustillo and Miguel Bustillo,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 31, 2007
HOUSTON -- Texas Gov. Rick Perry spared the life of death row inmate Kenneth Foster Jr. yesterday, just hours before he was to be executed for a murder he did not personally commit. Perry's decision to commute the death sentence of Foster, the getaway driver in a 1996 botched robbery that ended in a fatal shooting, came after the governor received a rare recommendation to do so from the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles. "After carefully considering the facts of this case, along with the recommendations from the Board of Pardons and Paroles, I believe the right and just decision is to commute Foster's sentence from the death penalty to life imprisonment," Perry said in a statement.
NEWS
August 10, 2006
Tom DeLay has long warned of an "out-of-control judiciary" and now his fears have been realized. A series of judges clearly beyond his control - Republicans as well as Democrats, serving on the Texas state bench as well as federal courts - blocked what may be the former House majority leader's last political maneuver. The final blow came Monday, when Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, one of the court's most conservative members, refused to allow Mr. DeLay to replace himself on a Texas congressional ballot with a hand-picked successor.
NEWS
By Scott Gold and Scott Gold,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 27, 2005
AUSTIN, Texas - A fund-raising operation founded by House Majority Leader Tom DeLay broke the law when its treasurer failed to report more than $500,000 in corporate money funneled into Texas campaigns during the pivotal 2002 elections, a judge ruled yesterday. Texas District Judge Joseph Hart determined that the treasurer, Bill Ceverha, must pay five Democratic candidates who lost their elections a combined $196,660 in damages. The ruling marks the first time - amid a flood of lawsuits and criminal investigations surrounding the Republican Party's rapid rise to power in Texas - that a piece of the GOP's aggressive fund-raising operation has been found illegal.
NEWS
April 4, 2005
Evidently Texas justice doesn't fly too well in at least one federal courtroom in Maryland. U.S. District Judge Andre M. Davis took testimony in Baltimore on Friday afternoon from two Houston lawyers at the sentencing hearing for Antony J. Marcantoni. Marcantoni, 24, already pleaded guilty to drug conspiracy, racketeering and identity fraud. The Baltimore man was arrested in Texas in 2002 when police found his Pontiac packed with 146 pounds of pot, according to court documents. But when he was booked, Marcantoni gave the police a fake I.D. (He said the police assumed he was the same guy on the driver's license; the police said he confirmed he was the man in the I.D.)
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 13, 1994
AUSTIN, Texas -- From Cheryl J. Hopwood's point of view, if overcoming past hardship was counted as a plus when applying to the University of Texas Law School, she should have been among the more qualified candidates.Ms. Hopwood's father died when she was young, and she was raised under difficult circumstances by her mother. She worked all through high school, and put herself through college, graduating with high grades from California State University at Sacramento.Then, having become a Texas resident, she did well enough on the law school admissions test to get into a category of law school applicant that is almost automatically admitted at Texas.
NEWS
April 4, 2005
Evidently Texas justice doesn't fly too well in at least one federal courtroom in Maryland. U.S. District Judge Andre M. Davis took testimony in Baltimore on Friday afternoon from two Houston lawyers at the sentencing hearing for Antony J. Marcantoni. Marcantoni, 24, already pleaded guilty to drug conspiracy, racketeering and identity fraud. The Baltimore man was arrested in Texas in 2002 when police found his Pontiac packed with 146 pounds of pot, according to court documents. But when he was booked, Marcantoni gave the police a fake I.D. (He said the police assumed he was the same guy on the driver's license; the police said he confirmed he was the man in the I.D.)
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2003
The first governor of the Massachusetts Colony famously envisioned a "city on a hill," but even in his idealism the governor noted the trouble with sex. Sex, John Winthrop lamented in his journals of the 1630s and 1640s, was everywhere, giving civil and church leaders reasons aplenty to punish "lewdness" and "incontinency." The country has long struggled with the reality of sex. The issue is almost always present. President Bush spoke yesterday against gay marriages, saying the administration was preparing legislation that would define marriage as a union between a man and woman.
NEWS
June 27, 2003
BY STRIKING DOWN a Texas law banning gay sex acts, the Supreme Court has strengthened the protections of privacy for all. In the case before the court, county sheriffs had broken into an apartment looking for a suspect only to discover two men having sex in their bedroom. The men were arrested and later convicted. Under Texas law, if the officers had surprised a heterosexual couple in the same position, they would not have been charged with anything. But because they were men, these two consenting adults were arrested and forced to air their extremely personal business in a public courtroom.
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