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By Dallas Morning News | April 7, 1991
DALLAS -- Texas Instruments Inc. claimed last week that on of its engineers was the first inventor of a computer that could be placed on a single microchip.The claim challenges a highly publicized patent awarded last July to an unknown California entrepreneur, Gilbert P. Hyatt.Although TI said it primarily wants to set the record straight, the winner of the legal battle could reap tens of millions of dollars in royalties from makers of products ranging from computer keyboards to videocassette recorders.
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NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | November 29, 2009
Fifth-graders at Longfellow Elementary School are eagerly recruiting votes for the chance to win $30,000 worth of new classroom equipment. The school is one of five elementaries in the nation - and the only one in Maryland - vying for the prizes in the third annual Classroom Makeover Video Contest. An online voting process, which counts for 30 percent of the school's score, is under way and will wrap up Friday. A judging panel will determine the remaining score, and the winning team will be announced Dec. 17. Michelle Baker, a technology teacher at the Columbia school, along with music teacher Diana Fay Williams and the entire fifth-grade class, produced a music video that parodied "That's Not My Name" by The Ting Tings for the contest.
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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | February 2, 1993
Texas Instruments Inc. said yesterday that it would eliminate 875 jobs over the next nine months, including about 35 at its computer software center in Hunt Valley.The Hunt Valley workers would be among the first to feel the impact of the layoffs, which the company attributed to a declining Defense Department budget. Workers at the Baltimore County complex were scheduled to be notified this week, according to Leslie Price, a Texas Instruments spokeswoman.She said they would be given 60 days before losing their jobs and the company would assist them in finding new employment.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2007
Texas Instruments Shares lost $2.84 to $31.43. The world's biggest maker of mobile phone chips said it expects sales of up to $3.68 billion in the fourth quarter. That missed the average estimate of $3.7 billion.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Lewis and Peter H. Lewis,New York Times News Service | October 31, 1990
Trying to re-establish itself as a leader in portable computers, Texas Instruments Inc. unveiled Monday a slim, lightweight, battery-powered portable computer based on the popular Intel 386SX microprocessor.The new Travelmate 3000, at 5.7 pounds and $5,499, is nearly 2 pounds lighter and $1,000 less expensive than a comparable machine introduced by Compaq just two weeks earlier.At the same time, Texas Instruments introduced a new laser printer that prints 16 pages a minute, twice the speed of the most common personal laser printers.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 3, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Raytheon Co. got U.S. approval for its $2.95 billion purchase of Texas Instruments Inc.'s defense electronics business by agreeing to sell a TI unit that produces a key component for radar systems.Under a settlement announced yesterday by the Justice Department, Raytheon will sell Texas Instruments' production facilities for high-power monolithic microwave integrated circuits, or MMICs, which extend the power and range of radar systems for fighter aircraft and other weapons systems.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 10, 2006
DALLAS -- Texas Instruments Inc., seeking to focus on mobile-phone chips, reached a $3 billion agreement with Bain Capital LLC yesterday to sell a unit that makes sensors used in cars, air conditioners and industrial equipment. The sale frees Texas Instruments of a business that is growing at half the rate of the rest of the company, Robert W. Baird analyst Tristan Gerra said. Chief Executive Officer Richard K. Templeton is emphasizing processors for handsets that play videos and surf the Web. "Wireless is the hottest segment for them, and everyone's zeroing in on the semiconductor group," said Daniel Morgan, who helps manage $5.45 billion, including Texas Instruments shares, at Synovus Investment Advisors in St. Petersburg, Fla. "They're looking for the areas with the most growth."
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1997
The newest partners have paired off in the defense industry's consolidation waltz, with Raytheon Co. announcing a $2.95 billion cash deal yesterday to purchase the defense operations of Texas Instruments Inc.Analysts said the pickup gives Massachusetts-based Raytheon an advantage in the drive to assemble one more big defense company in the shadow of the industry's two superpowers, Lockheed Martin Corp. of Bethesda and Boeing Co. of Seattle.The next to be sold should be GM Hughes, which is on the block at a reputed price of $8.5 billion.
NEWS
May 30, 1996
Jerry R. Junkins, 58, Texas Instruments CEOJerry R. Junkins, 58, who became chief executive officer of Texas Instruments Inc. 11 years ago and reshaped it in the face of global competition and military cuts, died yesterday of a heart attack during a business trip to Stuttgart, Germany.He spent his entire career at the huge electronics and defense firm, rising from parts clerk to CEO in 1985 and chairman in 1988."He has had an enormous impact not only on our industry, but on all of those of us who have known him," said Norman R. Augustine, chief executive of Lockheed Martin Corp.
BUSINESS
September 22, 2007
Texas Instruments Shares added 85 cents to $36.62 after the world's biggest maker of chips for mobile phones increased its share buyback plan by $5 billion and boosted its dividend for the second time this year.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 10, 2006
DALLAS -- Texas Instruments Inc., seeking to focus on mobile-phone chips, reached a $3 billion agreement with Bain Capital LLC yesterday to sell a unit that makes sensors used in cars, air conditioners and industrial equipment. The sale frees Texas Instruments of a business that is growing at half the rate of the rest of the company, Robert W. Baird analyst Tristan Gerra said. Chief Executive Officer Richard K. Templeton is emphasizing processors for handsets that play videos and surf the Web. "Wireless is the hottest segment for them, and everyone's zeroing in on the semiconductor group," said Daniel Morgan, who helps manage $5.45 billion, including Texas Instruments shares, at Synovus Investment Advisors in St. Petersburg, Fla. "They're looking for the areas with the most growth."
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | September 28, 2003
IT HAS BEEN every investor's daydream, inspiring escapist fiction at least since the Gilded Age: buying today's valuable asset at yesterday's depressed price. In Mark Twain's Following the Equator, an Australian bum reaps a fortune by slitting open a shark's belly and retrieving a newspaper with word of a big rise in London wool prices - news that won't arrive by steamer for another month. The people in Back to the Future II obtain a sports-score almanac published in the 21st century to make a killing on game bets in the 1950s.
NEWS
April 14, 2003
Cecil Howard Green, 102, the last living member of the four founders of electronics producer Texas Instruments, died Saturday in La Jolla, Calif., after contracting pneumonia. In December 1941, Mr. Green joined Eugene McDermott, J. Erik Jonsson and H. Bates Peacock to buy Dallas-based Geophysical Service Inc. During World War II, GSI branched into the production of submarine detection devices for the U.S. military. In 1951, the company's name was changed to Texas Instruments. Vera Zorina, 86, a dancer and actress whose career embraced classical ballet with such legendary troupes as the Ballets Russes de Monte Carlo and Broadway and Hollywood musicals, died Wednesday at her home in Santa Fe, N.M., after suffering a cerebral hemorrhage, her husband, harpsichordist Paul Wolfe, said.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2001
A year after being ranked as one of the fastest-growing technology companies in Maryland, RDA Corp., a Timonium-based software engineering company, has canceled plans to go public. The company notified the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission this week that it was withdrawing its registration, filed in June 2000, to sell 4 million shares in an initial public offering. "Our intention was that if the market came back, we would go with it, but it doesn't look like the market's coming back anytime soon," Stephen F. Kupres, the company's chief financial officer, said yesterday.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1999
Lockheed will test missile-interceptor system again today Lockheed Martin Corp., the world's largest defense contractor, will test its missile-interceptor system today after six consecutive failures, the last of which cost the Bethesda-based company a $15 million penalty. The Theater High-Altitude Area Air Defense System, or Thaad, missile being tested at White Sands Missile Range, N.M., is part of a $4 billion Pentagon program that could rise to $13 billion. The system is designed to destroy short-range ballistic missiles, such as the Scuds Iraq used in the 1991 Persian Gulf war. Bell Atlantic asks Mass.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | February 5, 1998
Calculators, a no-no in classrooms a few decades ago, are everywhere these days, with supporters saying the small hand-held devices have helped revolutionize math education.Since the mid-1980s, when calculators began to be commonly used in Maryland, sales have skyrocketed (one of the top four manufacturers, Texas Instruments, reported a doubling of sales revenue over the past six years, to $447 million) and Baltimore-area students -- letting calculators do the dirty work of arithmetic -- have scaled new mathematical heights.
NEWS
April 14, 2003
Cecil Howard Green, 102, the last living member of the four founders of electronics producer Texas Instruments, died Saturday in La Jolla, Calif., after contracting pneumonia. In December 1941, Mr. Green joined Eugene McDermott, J. Erik Jonsson and H. Bates Peacock to buy Dallas-based Geophysical Service Inc. During World War II, GSI branched into the production of submarine detection devices for the U.S. military. In 1951, the company's name was changed to Texas Instruments. Vera Zorina, 86, a dancer and actress whose career embraced classical ballet with such legendary troupes as the Ballets Russes de Monte Carlo and Broadway and Hollywood musicals, died Wednesday at her home in Santa Fe, N.M., after suffering a cerebral hemorrhage, her husband, harpsichordist Paul Wolfe, said.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 15, 1997
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks rose in seesaw trading yesterday as better-than-expected earnings from Pfizer Inc. spurred a drug share rally. Texas Instruments Inc. and Intel Corp. led a slump in computer-related issues.Companies that exceeded earnings forecasts didn't necessarily benefit. Texas Instruments, along with General Motors Corp. and Merrill Lynch & Co., beat the average profit forecast only to see their stocks drop.Analysts said 18 straight quarters of unexpectedly strong earnings have sent expectations so high that investors can dismiss even good news.
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