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NEWS
November 4, 1992
* Max Beck Skelton, 76, who covered everything from disasters to space flights in 35 years with the Associated Press, died Saturday. He set up the AP operation at NASA's Johnson Space Center, covering the Gemini, Apollo and shuttle projects. Mr. Skelton joined the AP in Dallas in 1946. In 1947, he covered the tanker explosion in Texas City that killed some 500 people. Later that year he was named Houston correspondent. Mr. Skelton recorded the rise of the city's oil industry and covered the introduction of the city's major league sports teams.
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BUSINESS
By David Greising | October 26, 2007
CHICAGO -- Oil giant BP PLC agreed to pay $373 million in fines and admit to criminal wrongdoing in a sweeping settlement of charges linked to a fatal Texas explosion, an oil spill in Alaska and illegal propane trading engineered from Chicago. In addition, a Chicago grand jury indicted four former BP employees on 20 counts of mail and wire fraud connected to the alleged fixing of prices in the propane market in February 2004. The scheme, allegedly involving huge purchases of propane and delayed deliveries through a pipeline serving the East Coast, pushed propane prices as high as 94 cents a gallon.
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BUSINESS
By David Greising | October 26, 2007
CHICAGO -- Oil giant BP PLC agreed to pay $373 million in fines and admit to criminal wrongdoing in a sweeping settlement of charges linked to a fatal Texas explosion, an oil spill in Alaska and illegal propane trading engineered from Chicago. In addition, a Chicago grand jury indicted four former BP employees on 20 counts of mail and wire fraud connected to the alleged fixing of prices in the propane market in February 2004. The scheme, allegedly involving huge purchases of propane and delayed deliveries through a pipeline serving the East Coast, pushed propane prices as high as 94 cents a gallon.
NEWS
By Ted Kooser and Ted Kooser,Special to the Sun | December 31, 2006
How many of us, when passing through some small town, have felt that it seemed familiar though we've never been there before? And of course it seems familiar, because much of the course of life is pretty much the same wherever we go, right down to the up-and-down fortunes of the football team and the unanswered love letters. Here's a poem by Mark Vinz. -- Ted Kooser "Driving Through" This could be the town you're from, marked only by what it's near. The gas station man speaks of weather and the high school football team just as you knew he would -- kind to strangers, happy to live here.
NEWS
By Ted Kooser and Ted Kooser,Special to the Sun | December 31, 2006
How many of us, when passing through some small town, have felt that it seemed familiar though we've never been there before? And of course it seems familiar, because much of the course of life is pretty much the same wherever we go, right down to the up-and-down fortunes of the football team and the unanswered love letters. Here's a poem by Mark Vinz. -- Ted Kooser "Driving Through" This could be the town you're from, marked only by what it's near. The gas station man speaks of weather and the high school football team just as you knew he would -- kind to strangers, happy to live here.
NEWS
May 2, 1999
Teodoro Garcia, a Mexican lieutenant who battled the rebel Pancho Villa in the Mexican Revolution and was believed to be the last living soldier from the army of the dictator Porfirio Diaz, died April 24 in a retirement home in Texas City, Texas. He was 110.Denzo Ishizaki, a former elementary school teacher who had been Japan's oldest person since February, died of multiple organ failure Thursday at his home in the town of Kansago in northeastern Ibaraki prefecture. He was 112.Charles Gordon,93, a son of immigrants who became the general counsel of the Immigration and Naturalization Service and founding author of the 20-volume treatise "Immigration Law and Procedure," died Wednesday in Panama City, Fla. He resided there and in Potomac in Montgomery County.
NEWS
February 4, 2004
Henry Ortiz Jr., a retired technical illustrator and designer, died Thursday of complications from diabetes at Good Samaritan Hospital. The Gardenville resident was 81. Born in San Antonio, he enlisted in the Army and participated in the D-Day invasion and Battle of the Bulge. He moved to Baltimore in 1950 and studied design and illustration at the Maryland Institute College of Art. He was a technical illustrator and designer at the former Glenn L. Martin Co. and later for Westinghouse in Hunt Valley.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | November 4, 2007
Environmental crime" has never had a positive ring to it. The vast oil spill from the tanker Exxon Valdez in Prince William Sound that polluted the water and killed thousands of animals in 1989 resulted in millions in criminal fines. London-based BP PLC, one of the largest international oil companies, recently agreed to admit to criminal wrongdoing and to accept probation in a settlement of environmental allegations. It also is paying $70 million in fines. The death toll this time involved people.
NEWS
February 27, 2003
Mary J. Roemer, 80, computer programmer Mary J. Roemer, a retired Bethlehem Steel Corp. computer programmer, died of cancer Sunday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. She was 80 and had lived in Dundalk for nearly a half-century. The former Mary J. Sewell was born and raised in Tonkawa, Okla., and lived in Texas City, Texas, before moving to Dundalk in 1954. She worked as a barmaid before going to work at the Sparrows Point plant of Beth Steel as a keypunch operator in 1956.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | August 13, 1992
PRINCETON, N.J. -- Municipal bond issuers announced yesterday the early redemption of eight issues totaling more than $24.23 million.The issues being called are:* New Castle County, Del., Series 1985, economic development revenue bonds maturing Aug. 1, 2000. $6.4 million conditionally called at par on Sept. 1, 1992.* Orange County (Fla.) Housing Finance Authority, Series 1991, mortgage revenue bonds maturing March 1 and Sept. 1, 1995, through Sept. 1, 2002, Sept. 1, 2011, March 1, 2017, Sept.
NEWS
May 2, 1999
Teodoro Garcia, a Mexican lieutenant who battled the rebel Pancho Villa in the Mexican Revolution and was believed to be the last living soldier from the army of the dictator Porfirio Diaz, died April 24 in a retirement home in Texas City, Texas. He was 110.Denzo Ishizaki, a former elementary school teacher who had been Japan's oldest person since February, died of multiple organ failure Thursday at his home in the town of Kansago in northeastern Ibaraki prefecture. He was 112.Charles Gordon,93, a son of immigrants who became the general counsel of the Immigration and Naturalization Service and founding author of the 20-volume treatise "Immigration Law and Procedure," died Wednesday in Panama City, Fla. He resided there and in Potomac in Montgomery County.
NEWS
November 4, 1992
* Max Beck Skelton, 76, who covered everything from disasters to space flights in 35 years with the Associated Press, died Saturday. He set up the AP operation at NASA's Johnson Space Center, covering the Gemini, Apollo and shuttle projects. Mr. Skelton joined the AP in Dallas in 1946. In 1947, he covered the tanker explosion in Texas City that killed some 500 people. Later that year he was named Houston correspondent. Mr. Skelton recorded the rise of the city's oil industry and covered the introduction of the city's major league sports teams.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 19, 1995
SAN ANTONIO -- Texas health officials last week beganair-dropping rabies vaccine in lard-scented pellets to try to contain an epidemic of the deadly disease that has been spread by coyotes and dogs.In the past seven years, two people in South Texas have died of the canine strain of the disease, and about 1,500 have been treated for exposure. More than 500 animal cases of rabies have been confirmed in dogs and coyotes, officials said."In 1988, we started seeing cases of rabies in coyotes in the very southern tip of Texas," said Dr. James Wright, a veterinarian with the Texas Department of Health.
NEWS
November 24, 1998
B. Carmage Walls, 90, who owned or operated scores of newspapers during more than 60 years in the industry, died Sunday in Houston. He headed Walls Investment Co., which owns the Galveston County Daily News and the Texas City Sun.He also once owned the Montgomery (Ala.) Advertiser. He became president and publisher of the Advertiser and the Alabama Journal in 1963, selling the Montgomery papers to Multimedia Inc. six years later.During the period he was the Advertiser's owner, he opposed the segregationist politics of then-Gov.
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