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Tevye

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By J. Wynn Rousuck | March 3, 2002
Theodore Bikel first played Tevye in Fiddler on the Roof more than three decades ago in Las Vegas, of all places. "On the other hand," as Tevye is fond of saying, what better place to sing "If I Were a Rich Man"? The Viennese-born performer has now portrayed the weary Russian-Jewish milkman in the Bock and Harnick musical more than 1,600 times, and he'll be at it again Tuesday when Fiddler opens a one-week run at the Mechanic Theatre. Baltimoreans last saw Bikel's Tevye in 1996. Adapted by Joseph Stein from stories by Sholom Aleichem, the plot of Fiddler concerns Tevye's efforts to find suitable husbands for his five daughters.
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By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
Toby's Dinner Theatre of Columbia's current production of the classic Broadway musical "Fiddler On the Roof" gets everything right in its glowing celebration of tradition. Here, a close-knit family of seasoned professionals achieves theater excellence as they tell the story of dairyman hero Tevye, struggling to maintain his beloved traditions amid the changing values of his five daughters, each of whom needs a husband. This family's story is told against the backdrop of tiny village Anatevka's Jewish community working to survive Czarist Russia.
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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | June 28, 1991
like "Gypsy," "Mame," "The Music Man," and others -- is one of thoseshows that goes only as far as its star will take it.The best ensemble in the world becomes superfluous if your Mama Rose, Mame Dennis, Harold Hill or Tevye the Dairyman can't light up the stage single-handedly.I am happy to report that the Annapolis Dinner Theater's production of "Fiddler on the Roof" is dominated by David Reynolds, who imbues the Jewish dairyman from the Ukraine with humanity, humor and insightfulness as he strives to balance the need for tradition and stability with the necessity of change in a changing world.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | February 22, 2013
Jewish villagers facing religious discrimination in Czarist Russia in 1905 provide "Fiddler on the Roof" with very serious subject matter for a Broadway musical, but these villagers possess a sharp sense of humor that helps them carry their burdens. They also know how to carry a tune. Those are the showbiz ingredients that have made "Fiddler" one of the most enduringly popular shows. Its popularity is being reinforced yet again in a confidently staged production at Toby's Dinner Theatre of Columbia.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 2002
In recent years, productions of Fiddler on the Roof at Chesapeake Music Hall have featured David Reynolds' imposing take on Tevye the Dairyman, the Ukrainian Jew perched so precariously between religious tradition and onrushing modernity in pre-Revolutionary Russia. But the multitalented Reynolds is no longer a Music Hall regular, and the prize role has been passed to Alan Hoffman, the theater's new lead player, who has made his mark in productions such as A Christmas Carol, Funny Girl and Copacabana.
NEWS
January 6, 1996
Arthur S. Spear, 75, former president and chairman of Mattel Inc., died Sunday in Los Angeles after a series of strokes. Under his leadership, the Barbie-doll maker increased net sales from $281 million in 1973, when he was named president, to $1 billion in 1986, when he retired as chairman.Paul Lipson, 82, a Broadway entertainer who appeared as Tevye in "Fiddler on the Roof" more times than any other actor, died Wednesday in New York. The original 1964 Broadway production of the musical starred Zero Mostel as Tevye, the play's protagonist, and Lipson as Avram, the bookseller.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 2, 1996
Tevye, the milkman protagonist in "Fiddler on the Roof," is a man who sees both sides of every argument. To borrow his favorite phrase, "on the one hand," the touring production at the Lyric Opera House proves this 1964 musical is as heartwarming as ever. "On the other hand," it lacks a little vitality -- even the scenery, whose designer is uncredited, seems washed out.Consider Tevye himself. Theodore Bikel has played this role more than 1,000 times, and his acting cannot be faulted. As the impoverished father of five daughters -- a turn-of-the-century Russian Jewish villager who cannot afford a dowry for them -- his paternal devotion is unmistakable.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 7, 2002
The theme of tradition runs through Fiddler on the Roof, and it's become a tradition to mount road companies that are carbon copies of the 1964 original. Like at least two other touring productions that have played Baltimore in the last decade, the production at the Mechanic Theatre is directed and choreographed by Sammy Dallas Bayes, re-creating Jerome Robbins' original staging. Even the sets are based on Boris Aronson's original designs (though they look rather scanty, especially the sparse, two-dimensional trees)
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | September 16, 1994
The set of September Song resembles a family reunion -- something that happens only once a year with basically the same group of people, but with a few new additions.The regulars greet each other with hugs and kisses, and the new members are introduced all around. Then it's time to get down to business.For its 21st production, September Song, a community theater group, will repeat its 1984 show, "Fiddler on the Roof," at 8 p.m. tomorrow and Sept. 23 and 24, and at 2:30 p.m. Sunday at Westminster High School.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 6, 2003
An impressive production of Fiddler on the Roof is the current offering at Toby's Dinner Theatre. The story, like much of the show's music, is in a minor key. In 1905, in a Russian village, lives a Jewish dairyman named Tevye who endures poverty with dogged persistence and a wry sense of humor. He has five daughters and hopes to find suitable husbands for the older ones, but the daughters have their own ideas about who is suitable. In the background, threatening them and everyone else in the village, is the official anti-Semitism of the czarist government.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | October 22, 2009
The humble Jewish folk of Anatevka haven't changed much since they were first seen on the Broadway stage 45 years ago in a hit musical called "Fiddler on the Roof." The world hasn't changed much, either, at least not in terms of peaceful coexistence between people of different faiths and customs, which was really all that the Anatevkans yearned for in their little corner of cruel, czarist country. No wonder the touring production of "Fiddler" that has taken up temporary residence at the Hippodrome strikes such a strong chord.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | October 18, 2009
Sunrise, sunset. The actor known by just his last name - Topol - first played the part of Tevye the Milkman in "Fiddler on the Roof" in Tel Aviv in 1966, when he was 30 years old. Some 44 years later, he will play Tevye for the twenty-seven-hundred-and-somethingth time when he opens Tuesday at the Hippodrome Theatre in what is being billed as his farewell tour. "I stopped counting after I reached 2,500 performances," Topol says over the phone. "This is one of the five best parts ever written for a male actor-singer.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | November 30, 2007
The attempt to establish a movie as a "Hanukkah perennial" brings up bad memories of Jewish-American farces - Adam Sandler's Eight Crazy Nights or Adam Goldberg's The Hebrew Hammer. But the Senator Theatre has a better idea. Starting Tuesday, Hanukkah's first night, Baltimore's premier movie palace will present a collector's print of Fiddler on the Roof in four-track stereo, complete with a celebrity menorah-lighting before each evening show throughout the holiday. (An added attraction for movie lovers: This print was struck with the luxurious old Technicolor process known as dye imbibition.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 18, 2006
If a Baltimore-based troupe hadn't snagged the name in 1916, Pasadena Theatre Company might more aptly be called the Vagabond Players. The nomadic group will open its new season next month with Fiddler on the Roof at Annapolis Area Christian School's Kerr Performing Arts Center in Severn - by rough count, its 13th home. Founded in 1978, the group first performed in the old A&P building on Crain Highway in Glen Burnie. President Sharon Steele said it moved to the Old Mill school complex in Millersville, then to Glen Burnie High School, Northeast High School in Pasadena, St. Bernadette Parish in Severn, and Baldwin Hall in Millersville.
NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 28, 2003
As Madeleine Jansen prepares to play the title role in her high school's production of Fiddler on the Roof, the Mount Airy teen-ager is taking her cues from a musician who is more than a little bit familiar with the classic. Her tutor, Lya Stern, played violin a quarter century ago in a production starring the actor whose name is synonymous with the play, Zero Mostel. "She tells me stories about the production of the original Fiddler, like when Zero Mostel ... would change the act each night and how the actors and orchestra would have to follow along and keep on their toes," said Madeleine, who will make her debut in the fiddler role when South Carroll High School's production opens a four-performance run tonight.
NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 28, 2003
As Madeleine Jansen prepares to play the title role in her high school's production of Fiddler on the Roof, the Mount Airy teen-ager is taking her cues from a musician who is more than a little bit familiar with the classic. Her tutor, Lya Stern, played violin a quarter century ago in a production starring the actor whose name is synonymous with the play, Zero Mostel. "She tells me stories about the production of the original Fiddler, like when Zero Mostel ... would change the act each night and how the actors and orchestra would have to follow along and keep on their toes," said Madeleine, who will make her debut in the fiddler role when South Carroll High School's production opens a four-performance run tonight.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | November 30, 2007
The attempt to establish a movie as a "Hanukkah perennial" brings up bad memories of Jewish-American farces - Adam Sandler's Eight Crazy Nights or Adam Goldberg's The Hebrew Hammer. But the Senator Theatre has a better idea. Starting Tuesday, Hanukkah's first night, Baltimore's premier movie palace will present a collector's print of Fiddler on the Roof in four-track stereo, complete with a celebrity menorah-lighting before each evening show throughout the holiday. (An added attraction for movie lovers: This print was struck with the luxurious old Technicolor process known as dye imbibition.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | October 18, 2009
Sunrise, sunset. The actor known by just his last name - Topol - first played the part of Tevye the Milkman in "Fiddler on the Roof" in Tel Aviv in 1966, when he was 30 years old. Some 44 years later, he will play Tevye for the twenty-seven-hundred-and-somethingth time when he opens Tuesday at the Hippodrome Theatre in what is being billed as his farewell tour. "I stopped counting after I reached 2,500 performances," Topol says over the phone. "This is one of the five best parts ever written for a male actor-singer.
NEWS
By William Hyder and William Hyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 6, 2003
An impressive production of Fiddler on the Roof is the current offering at Toby's Dinner Theatre. The story, like much of the show's music, is in a minor key. In 1905, in a Russian village, lives a Jewish dairyman named Tevye who endures poverty with dogged persistence and a wry sense of humor. He has five daughters and hopes to find suitable husbands for the older ones, but the daughters have their own ideas about who is suitable. In the background, threatening them and everyone else in the village, is the official anti-Semitism of the czarist government.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 26, 2002
In recent years, productions of Fiddler on the Roof at Chesapeake Music Hall have featured David Reynolds' imposing take on Tevye the Dairyman, the Ukrainian Jew perched so precariously between religious tradition and onrushing modernity in pre-Revolutionary Russia. But the multitalented Reynolds is no longer a Music Hall regular, and the prize role has been passed to Alan Hoffman, the theater's new lead player, who has made his mark in productions such as A Christmas Carol, Funny Girl and Copacabana.
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