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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | April 27, 2012
News Roundup •••• Adam Sessler, host of G4TV's gaming flagship “X-Play,” has left the network and the long-running show. Sessler was a fixture on the network's previous incarnations, ZDTV and TechTV, having co-hosted “X-Play” with Morgan Webb for nearly a decade. [ Kotaku ] •••• A new study has found that playing “Tetris” can ease the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. It can also get you kicked out of math class if you play it too conspicuously on your TI-86 calculator.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | April 27, 2012
News Roundup •••• Adam Sessler, host of G4TV's gaming flagship “X-Play,” has left the network and the long-running show. Sessler was a fixture on the network's previous incarnations, ZDTV and TechTV, having co-hosted “X-Play” with Morgan Webb for nearly a decade. [ Kotaku ] •••• A new study has found that playing “Tetris” can ease the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. It can also get you kicked out of math class if you play it too conspicuously on your TI-86 calculator.
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BUSINESS
By Rory J. O'Connor and Rory J. O'Connor,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 22, 1991
ALAMEDA, Calif. -- The best-selling game, where players must manipulate geometric shapes that fall rapidly down the screen, is also one of the best-known Soviet imports to the United States, and its publisher thinks the time is ripe for a new version.But the two principal programmers responsible for the game have decided the best way to cater to the U.S. market is to understand it firsthand. So Alexey Pajitnov and Vladimir Pokhilko, his partner, have moved with their families to the San Francisco Bay Area for an extended stay, perhaps as long as three years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By NEWSDAY | October 29, 2000
Even if you can't recall a recent event, might you still dream about it? According to a new study, the answer -- a surprising yes -- is raising a slew of questions about where dreams come from, what they mean and what role they play in learning and memory. Dr. Robert Stickgold, a psychiatrist at Harvard Medical School in Boston and the lead author of the research effort, says the combination of the popular computer game Tetris and a group of volunteers, including some with amnesia, has paved the way for future scientific studies of dreams.
BUSINESS
By Stephen Manes and Stephen Manes,New York Times News Service | August 4, 1997
THE MICROSOFT CORP. has long contributed to the electronic drain on America's productivity with games such as "Flight Simulator," "Solitaire," "Minesweeper," "Powerpoint" and "Windows Reboot."Its newest entry is "Microsoft Entertainment Pack: The Puzzle Collection," a project developed largely in Russia and overseen by Alexey Pajitnov, the Moscow-born designer of the infuriatingly addictive "Tetris." He works for Microsoft.The pack, on a CD-ROM, costs about $35; it is designed for Windows 95 computers with a 486/66 processor or better and can be installed to run entirely from your hard disk if you are willing to sacrifice about 30 megabytes of it.The nine games on the disk all demand strategic thinking.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | October 23, 1990
You went out and bought your kids an electronic game system, and now they'd rather play than do their homework. They delay bedtime, race away from the dinner table and talk incessantly about the Mario brothers, Princess Zelda and the Tetris wall.The squeaks and beeps, the zaps and squeals and monotonous melodies from the computer game set are driving you nutty.Are the games making your youngsters crazy, too?That seems to depend on what they play and whom you ask.Psychologist-author John Rosemond of Gastonia, N.C., says he's voice crying in the wilderness" as he describes the games as "addictive," "stress-inducing" and "often leading to explosions of frustration.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz and Michael J. Himowitz,Staff Writer | July 13, 1992
With vacation around the corner, it's hard to concentrate on serious computer issues. So I decided to look at a couple of entertainment titles before heading off to the lake.My conclusion is that the surgeon general should make publishers put a warning on some of this stuff -- it's addictive. Here it is, 1 o'clock in the morning, and I don't know where the night went.It started off innocently enough, with a new version of an old favorite -- Tetris Classic from Spectrum Holobyte ($49.95 list, but who pays list?
ENTERTAINMENT
By NEWSDAY | October 29, 2000
Even if you can't recall a recent event, might you still dream about it? According to a new study, the answer -- a surprising yes -- is raising a slew of questions about where dreams come from, what they mean and what role they play in learning and memory. Dr. Robert Stickgold, a psychiatrist at Harvard Medical School in Boston and the lead author of the research effort, says the combination of the popular computer game Tetris and a group of volunteers, including some with amnesia, has paved the way for future scientific studies of dreams.
ENTERTAINMENT
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 30, 2006
Downloaded singles 1.Bad Day, Daniel Powter 2. Unwritten, Natasha Bedingfield 3.Temperature, Sean Paul 4. Move Along, The All-American Rejects 5.Beep, The Pussycat Dolls [Courtesy iTunes] Downloaded albums 1.Both Sides of the Gun, Ben Harper 2.Underage Thinking, Teddy Geiger 3.Youth, Matisyahu 4.Back to Bedlam (bonus video version), James Blunt 5.How to Save a Life, The Fray [Courtesy iTunes] New Video Game Sales (most ordered at Amazon.com) 1.Elder Scrolls 4: Oblivion Collector's Edition, Windows PC 2.Elder Scrolls 4: Oblivion (DVD)
FEATURES
By Aaron Siegel | July 25, 1991
Here are some of the hottest games at the video arcades this summer. Not all games are available at all arcades.* Neo-Geo: This is the arcade version of the $650 home game system that figures to be the top game system of the next few years. You have your choice of up to six built-in games on one machine. It costs 50 cents to start your game, but only a quarter to continue. I played King of the Monsters and Sen-Goku. In Monsters, you're a monster pitted against many others in various Japanese cities, all the time wrecking buildings and collecting power capsules.
BUSINESS
By Stephen Manes and Stephen Manes,New York Times News Service | August 4, 1997
THE MICROSOFT CORP. has long contributed to the electronic drain on America's productivity with games such as "Flight Simulator," "Solitaire," "Minesweeper," "Powerpoint" and "Windows Reboot."Its newest entry is "Microsoft Entertainment Pack: The Puzzle Collection," a project developed largely in Russia and overseen by Alexey Pajitnov, the Moscow-born designer of the infuriatingly addictive "Tetris." He works for Microsoft.The pack, on a CD-ROM, costs about $35; it is designed for Windows 95 computers with a 486/66 processor or better and can be installed to run entirely from your hard disk if you are willing to sacrifice about 30 megabytes of it.The nine games on the disk all demand strategic thinking.
BUSINESS
By Michael J. Himowitz and Michael J. Himowitz,Staff Writer | July 13, 1992
With vacation around the corner, it's hard to concentrate on serious computer issues. So I decided to look at a couple of entertainment titles before heading off to the lake.My conclusion is that the surgeon general should make publishers put a warning on some of this stuff -- it's addictive. Here it is, 1 o'clock in the morning, and I don't know where the night went.It started off innocently enough, with a new version of an old favorite -- Tetris Classic from Spectrum Holobyte ($49.95 list, but who pays list?
BUSINESS
By Rory J. O'Connor and Rory J. O'Connor,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 22, 1991
ALAMEDA, Calif. -- The best-selling game, where players must manipulate geometric shapes that fall rapidly down the screen, is also one of the best-known Soviet imports to the United States, and its publisher thinks the time is ripe for a new version.But the two principal programmers responsible for the game have decided the best way to cater to the U.S. market is to understand it firsthand. So Alexey Pajitnov and Vladimir Pokhilko, his partner, have moved with their families to the San Francisco Bay Area for an extended stay, perhaps as long as three years.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | October 23, 1990
You went out and bought your kids an electronic game system, and now they'd rather play than do their homework. They delay bedtime, race away from the dinner table and talk incessantly about the Mario brothers, Princess Zelda and the Tetris wall.The squeaks and beeps, the zaps and squeals and monotonous melodies from the computer game set are driving you nutty.Are the games making your youngsters crazy, too?That seems to depend on what they play and whom you ask.Psychologist-author John Rosemond of Gastonia, N.C., says he's voice crying in the wilderness" as he describes the games as "addictive," "stress-inducing" and "often leading to explosions of frustration.
ENTERTAINMENT
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 29, 2005
THE BEST OF 2005 This year lacked a hyped blockbuster like "Halo 2" - the hype went to the new systems, the PlayStation Portable and the Xbox 360 - but it was still stuffed to the brim with great games. Here are some of the best: Lumines (PlayStation Portable) Lumines may be even better than the perennial Tetris. At heart it's a simple block puzzler - guide clumps of four blocks in two tones, and match them up into two-by-two or larger shapes that are cleared out by a glowing line that moves to the tempo of the game's music.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jay Friess and Jay Friess,SUN STAFF | July 27, 1998
The Internet has brought some of the biggest changes to hit video gaming since 3D graphics.The most celebrated effect has been multi-player gaming, allowing players to make games installed on their PCs - such as Quake and Warcraft - connect with games installed on other players' computers.But the Internet, combined with Sun Microsystem's Java programming language, has spawned an entirely new creature - the Net Game. Written in Java, these games can be automatically downloaded on even slow connections in minutes.
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