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Tetanus

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By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | August 10, 1993
Q: Last week, my 17-year-old son stepped on a nail or something that went through his sneaker and slightly punctured the bottom of his foot. Our doctor said there was no need to give him a tetanus shot. Why?A: Without knowing all the details of your son's medical history, we canonly guess as to why your son's physician reached such a conclusion. Children usually get a primary tetanus immunization series during the first year of life with boosters at 18 months and again at 5 years. Then the schedule switches to a booster dose at 10-year intervals throughout life.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 2, 2005
HOUSTON - The first wave of an expected 25,000 evacuees from Hurricane Katrina arrived at the Astrodome yesterday in yellow school buses, luxury tour coaches and their own battered and muddied vehicles. The refugees had originally sought sanctuary at the Louisiana Superdome, now rendered uninhabitable by unsanitary conditions, oppressive heat, a leaky roof, violence and a shortage of food and water. Because it is only about 350 miles from New Orleans, Houston has become evacuation central, with the relief effort straining public and private resources.
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NEWS
By Medical Tribune News Service | March 23, 1995
Despite the availability of effective vaccines for tetanus since the 1940s, high numbers of older Americans are not properly immunized against the now-rare but often fatal infectious disease, according to a new study.Researchers hope the findings will spur doctors to give tetanus booster shots every 10 years to their elderly patients.Scientists from the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta measured tetanus antibody levels in 10,618 Americans to assess their immune status.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2005
Swimming pools closed. Businesses were quarantined. Hospitals transported infected patients in special ambulances. Worried citizens avoided crowds by staying away from buses and theaters. That's how Maryland, and much of America, coped with the polio epidemics that swept through the country in the 1950s. "Your parents would tell you, don't get overly tired and don't get too close to crowds. Then the summer would come and they'd close the pools and that would be it," said Richard Holland, 72, who grew up in Catonsville and graduated from Baltimore Polytechnic Institute in 1951.
NEWS
November 2, 2004
TETANUS, AN often fatal disease that lurks in common garden soil, has pretty much slipped off the radar of everyday concerns in this country. Infants have been routinely vaccinated against the infection since the 1940s, and 10-year booster shots are regularly provided to adults during periodic health checkups. Preventative care has been so effective against tetanus, in fact, that only about 50 cases a year are reported in the United States. And nearly all of those afflict people who have never had the vaccination, or who have failed to keep up with the booster shots.
NEWS
By KORKY VANN and KORKY VANN,Special to the Sun | September 22, 2002
For many seniors, doctor visits, medications and treatments are all parts of aging. But vaccinations, they assume, are not. Studies show that most older Americans believe shots are kid stuff, more important for their grandchildren than for themselves. This is a misconception that could be fatal. Each year in the United States, nearly 40,000 adults die from vaccine-preventable diseases or their complications. The American Society of Internal Medicine says adults are about 100 times more likely to die from vaccine-preventable diseases than children, yet few older folks think to keep a record of immunizations or to check with their physicians to be sure they are up to date.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | January 21, 1996
I will frankly admit that I am afraid of medical care. I trace this fear to my childhood, when as far as I could tell, the medical profession's reaction to every physical problem I developed, including nearsightedness, was to give me a tetanus shot. Not only that, but the medical professionals would always lie about it."You'll hardly feel it!" they'd say, coming at me with a needle the size of a harpoon.As a child, I was more afraid of tetanus shots than, for example, Dracula. Granted, Dracula would come into your room at night and bite into your neck and suck out all your blood, but there was a positive side to this; namely, you could turn into a bat and stay out all night.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | April 28, 1992
Timely immunizations are very important in a young child's life, but too many parents fail to heed the advice of physicians to have their children vaccinated early.Sometimes, because of inadequate health insurance or simple procrastination, it is not until children are enrolled in day care or are even of school age that parents ensure that their kids' vaccination records meet minimum standards.With that in mind, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has named this Saturday Baltimore Child Immunization Day, and the Junior League is sponsoring free immunizations at the Shepherd's Clinic, 1927 St. Paul St., in an effort to get families thinking in terms of preventive health care.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | April 28, 1992
While timely immunizations are very important in a young child's life, too many parents fail to heed the advice of physicians to have their children vaccinated early.Sometimes, because of inadequate health insurance or simple procrastination, it is not until children are enrolled in day care or are even of school age that parents ensure that their kids' vaccination records meet minimum standards.With that in mind, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke has named this Saturday Baltimore Child Immunization Day, and the Junior League is sponsoring free immunizations at the Shepherd's Clinic, 1927 St. Paul St., in an effort to get families thinking in terms of preventive health care.
SPORTS
February 17, 1991
Q: That's an enchanting shade of green they've picked to paint many of the steel girders, but I'm not crazy about parts that are rusty and seemingly a tetanus threat. Is this a deliberate attempt at color uncoordination?A: In a word, yes. Only the girders that will be exposed when the ballpark is finished have been painted. This achieves two things. The steel looks nice. And it lasts. After they are sandblasted, painted with a rust-resistant primer and sprayed with an acrylic coat, the finish is supposed to last 15 years, or until Cal Ripken misses consecutive games.
NEWS
November 2, 2004
TETANUS, AN often fatal disease that lurks in common garden soil, has pretty much slipped off the radar of everyday concerns in this country. Infants have been routinely vaccinated against the infection since the 1940s, and 10-year booster shots are regularly provided to adults during periodic health checkups. Preventative care has been so effective against tetanus, in fact, that only about 50 cases a year are reported in the United States. And nearly all of those afflict people who have never had the vaccination, or who have failed to keep up with the booster shots.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2004
Though it remains a common killer in poor regions of the world, tetanus has all but disappeared in the United States, thanks to vaccines and booster shots that doctors urge everyone to get. But somehow, 71-year-old Estelle Driver of Halethorpe managed to go decades - perhaps all her life - without a tetanus shot. This summer, she faced the consequences after she fell on a garden stake and developed a raging tetanus infection that nearly took her life. The symptoms didn't occur right away.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | August 31, 2003
Show of hands. How many of you have ever gouged yourself with a fillet knife? Stuck yourself with a fish hook? Stepped on broken glass? Had a tree limb make a deep impression on your flesh? Thought so. I had all four of my hands in the air, too. Now, how many of you have had a tetanus booster shot in the past decade? Hmmm. Not nearly as many hands in the air. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta says 53 percent of us in the adult category either never had a tetanus shot or the shots we had as kids have worn off and we're unprotected.
NEWS
By KORKY VANN and KORKY VANN,Special to the Sun | September 22, 2002
For many seniors, doctor visits, medications and treatments are all parts of aging. But vaccinations, they assume, are not. Studies show that most older Americans believe shots are kid stuff, more important for their grandchildren than for themselves. This is a misconception that could be fatal. Each year in the United States, nearly 40,000 adults die from vaccine-preventable diseases or their complications. The American Society of Internal Medicine says adults are about 100 times more likely to die from vaccine-preventable diseases than children, yet few older folks think to keep a record of immunizations or to check with their physicians to be sure they are up to date.
NEWS
By Pamela Woolford and Pamela Woolford,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 23, 2000
A 21-YEAR resident of east Columbia, Gino Hijadagrew up in Owen Brown and led not an uncommon life. He served in the Air Force in the early 1990s. In 1993, he returned to Columbia and soon met his future wife, Lynette. They became "best friends," he said. Four years ago, the couple had their first child, Kahlil, whose name in Arabic means "best friend." Soon after his birth, the couple realized their son had health problems."Kahlil is a God-sent child who has been diagnosed with severe cerebral palsy," Lynette Hijada wrote in a flier seeking donations for their son's medical fund.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 22, 1999
An American support group for UNICEF, the United Nations children's fund, announced yesterday that it has received its largest donation ever, a grant of $26 million from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation earmarked for the elimination of tetanus among mothers and babies in the poorest nations.Nearly 250,000 people, most of them infants, died of tetanus in the developing world in 1998, according to the U.S. Committee for UNICEF, the American support group and the oldest of UNICEF's 37 national support committees.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 2, 2005
HOUSTON - The first wave of an expected 25,000 evacuees from Hurricane Katrina arrived at the Astrodome yesterday in yellow school buses, luxury tour coaches and their own battered and muddied vehicles. The refugees had originally sought sanctuary at the Louisiana Superdome, now rendered uninhabitable by unsanitary conditions, oppressive heat, a leaky roof, violence and a shortage of food and water. Because it is only about 350 miles from New Orleans, Houston has become evacuation central, with the relief effort straining public and private resources.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1997
Orioles manager Davey Johnson remains bullish on rookie Mike Johnson, saying that though "the easy thing to do would be to go with [Shawn] Boskie" as the fifth starter, he is confident that a regular routine between starts will improve the right-hander's performance tomorrow night against the Cleveland Indians.Johnson surrendered three runs to the Indians in Sunday's no-decision. Pitching coach Ray Miller barely stopped short of guaranteeing a Johnson win tomorrow against Cleveland and ace Charles Nagy.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1998
Like detectives, they knock on the doors of hundreds of Baltimore families, leave notes when no one answers, and coax their way in when someone does. They're after one valuable piece of information: Does your toddler have all his shots?For Baltimore health officials, that question has long been an embarrassing one. Just five years ago, the city posted mediocre immunization rates -- only 55 percent of 2- and 3-year-olds. But today, with about 85 percent coverage, Baltimore boasts one of the best rates in the country.
SPORTS
By Joe Strauss and Joe Strauss,SUN STAFF | May 29, 1997
Orioles manager Davey Johnson remains bullish on rookie Mike Johnson, saying that though "the easy thing to do would be to go with [Shawn] Boskie" as the fifth starter, he is confident that a regular routine between starts will improve the right-hander's performance tomorrow night against the Cleveland Indians.Johnson surrendered three runs to the Indians in Sunday's no-decision. Pitching coach Ray Miller barely stopped short of guaranteeing a Johnson win tomorrow against Cleveland and ace Charles Nagy.
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