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By Michael R. Levene | February 2, 1993
IT WAS my first night on guard duty -- and my last.Twenty-five years ago last Friday night, I had been in Vietnam for five months and had been stationed at the sprawling Long Binh army base northeast of Saigon for three months.Guard duty rotated among the thousands of support troops, which meant that it fell to each of us for one week at most during our year's tour of duty.On Jan. 29, 1968, shortly after my three fellow guards and I had reported to our bunker -- one of dozens spaced out along the border of the base -- for the 6 p.m.-to-6 a.m. shift, a jeep approached.
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NEWS
By Gian P. Gentile | August 12, 2004
THERE HAS BEEN much talk that the military in Iraq, especially the Army and Marines, have not learned the lessons of Vietnam and how to fight a counterinsurgency. A repeated criticism is that the military continues to focus on "body counts" as an indicator of success in Iraq and yet has not been able to destroy the insurgency. This recalls the unraveling of the U.S. military effort in Vietnam after the 1968 Tet offensive. Iraq, in this line of thinking, is Vietnam all over again. But perhaps the critics are wrong, and the U.S. military has learned some important lessons from the Vietnam War and is applying them in Iraq, even in the face of the fierce battle between the Marines and Muqtada al-Sadr's insurgents in Najaf.
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NEWS
By Michael R. Levene | January 25, 1998
A movie poster might have called it "a front row seat to history."For years, what impressed me about my "front row" view as the Tet offensive began 30 years ago this Friday (I was on guard duty that night) was the surrealistic feeling that I was, literally, nothing more than a spectator. The orange billows and rumbles of the exploding shells had nothing to do with me, it seemed, and would vanish when I turned off the set or left to go to the concession stand.A year earlier, I had been in college.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2004
Fallujah. Kirkuk. Najaf. Ramadi. Even Baghdad. For some observers, this week's coverage of the widespread, intensified armed resistance to the U.S.-led occupation of Iraq has summoned up ghosts of a past conflict: the January 1968 Tet Offensive during the Vietnam War. U.S. forces ultimately quelled that uprising, which led to battles for control of cities throughout South Vietnam. But its depth and sophistication - reflected on the networks' nightly news in millions of homes throughout the country - shook the confidence of many Americans.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2004
Fallujah. Kirkuk. Najaf. Ramadi. Even Baghdad. For some observers, this week's coverage of the widespread, intensified armed resistance to the U.S.-led occupation of Iraq has summoned up ghosts of a past conflict: the January 1968 Tet Offensive during the Vietnam War. U.S. forces ultimately quelled that uprising, which led to battles for control of cities throughout South Vietnam. But its depth and sophistication - reflected on the networks' nightly news in millions of homes throughout the country - shook the confidence of many Americans.
NEWS
By SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE Title: "Ghostrider One" Author: Gerry Carroll Publisher: Pocket Books Length, price: 439 pages, $22 and SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE Title: "Ghostrider One" Author: Gerry Carroll Publisher: Pocket Books Length, price: 439 pages, $22,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 19, 1993
In a review of "Ghostrider One" in Sunday's book page, author Gerry Carroll was identified as a resident of St. Mary's County. Mr. Carroll died in October.+ The Sun regrets the errors.Title: "What Child Is This?"Author: Rebecca YorkPublisher: Harlequin IntrigueLength, price: 243 pages, $2.99 (paperback)Rebecca York's "43 Light St." series revolves around a group of women who work in an office building in downtown Baltimore. The tenants, including a psychologist, a movie producer and a private eye, frequently manage to get into life-threatening situations.
NEWS
By Gian P. Gentile | August 12, 2004
THERE HAS BEEN much talk that the military in Iraq, especially the Army and Marines, have not learned the lessons of Vietnam and how to fight a counterinsurgency. A repeated criticism is that the military continues to focus on "body counts" as an indicator of success in Iraq and yet has not been able to destroy the insurgency. This recalls the unraveling of the U.S. military effort in Vietnam after the 1968 Tet offensive. Iraq, in this line of thinking, is Vietnam all over again. But perhaps the critics are wrong, and the U.S. military has learned some important lessons from the Vietnam War and is applying them in Iraq, even in the face of the fierce battle between the Marines and Muqtada al-Sadr's insurgents in Najaf.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | April 11, 1993
Havre de Grace.-- We're hearing a lot about 1968 these days, as the 25th anniversary of one dreadful event after another arrives and is duly commemorated. As nostalgia goes, this is pretty grisly stuff.The best that can be said for 1968, a quarter of a century afterward, is that because it was such a terrible time it made the worst of the years that followed a little easier to bear. In that sense, those of us who remember it vividly may be lucky. Living through 1968 gave us perspective. It made us tougher.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | November 18, 1992
SALISBURY -- He was a 26-year-old soldier when, on the eve of the 1968 Vietnamese New Year, tens of thousands of his fellow Communist troops simultaneously attacked hundreds of populated targets in the south."
TOPIC
By Bruce B.G. Clarke | April 16, 2000
From the Vietnam War experience we should learn the relationship between political and military objectives, if we learn nothing else. In this process we should develop a sense of what it means to win. Winning is not necessarily the destruction of the enemy, though it will often help. The Vietnam War was a political war -- not for the United States but for the North Vietnamese. They understood that the war would not be won on the battlefields of Vietnam. It would be won in the streets of the United States.
TOPIC
By Bruce B.G. Clarke | April 16, 2000
From the Vietnam War experience we should learn the relationship between political and military objectives, if we learn nothing else. In this process we should develop a sense of what it means to win. Winning is not necessarily the destruction of the enemy, though it will often help. The Vietnam War was a political war -- not for the United States but for the North Vietnamese. They understood that the war would not be won on the battlefields of Vietnam. It would be won in the streets of the United States.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1998
The prisoner's grimacing face, a face caught in the moment between life and death, became one of the most vivid images of the Vietnam War. Like the recurrence of a particularly unpleasant nightmare, that face reappeared this month with the death of South Vietnamese Gen. Nguyen Loan, the man's executioner.Photographer Eddie Adams' extraordinary picture of that impromptu execution on a Saigon street in February 1968 captured perfectly the brutality of the war in Vietnam: Loan's arm outstretched, the man's hands secured behind his back, his twisted mouth, even the bullet leaving his skull, some say.Loan died July 14 of cancer in Northern Virginia, three decades after Adams' photograph imparted an odd immortality to both prisoner and executioner.
NEWS
By Linda White and Linda White,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1998
It was the shot seen round the world. Even today, 30 years later, the photograph of the summary street-corner execution of a Viet Cong prisoner by a South Vietnamese general remains perhaps the most enduring image of the Vietnam War.So precise was the timing of Associated Press photographer Eddie Adams that the executioner's bullet can be seen as it emerges from the head of the victim. The photograph won the Pulitzer Prize for 1969. Some say it also altered America's support for the war. And it forever changed the lives of the photographer and the subject.
NEWS
By Michael R. Levene | January 25, 1998
A movie poster might have called it "a front row seat to history."For years, what impressed me about my "front row" view as the Tet offensive began 30 years ago this Friday (I was on guard duty that night) was the surrealistic feeling that I was, literally, nothing more than a spectator. The orange billows and rumbles of the exploding shells had nothing to do with me, it seemed, and would vanish when I turned off the set or left to go to the concession stand.A year earlier, I had been in college.
NEWS
By SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE Title: "Ghostrider One" Author: Gerry Carroll Publisher: Pocket Books Length, price: 439 pages, $22 and SUSANNE TROWBRIDGE Title: "Ghostrider One" Author: Gerry Carroll Publisher: Pocket Books Length, price: 439 pages, $22,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 19, 1993
In a review of "Ghostrider One" in Sunday's book page, author Gerry Carroll was identified as a resident of St. Mary's County. Mr. Carroll died in October.+ The Sun regrets the errors.Title: "What Child Is This?"Author: Rebecca YorkPublisher: Harlequin IntrigueLength, price: 243 pages, $2.99 (paperback)Rebecca York's "43 Light St." series revolves around a group of women who work in an office building in downtown Baltimore. The tenants, including a psychologist, a movie producer and a private eye, frequently manage to get into life-threatening situations.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | April 11, 1993
Havre de Grace.-- We're hearing a lot about 1968 these days, as the 25th anniversary of one dreadful event after another arrives and is duly commemorated. As nostalgia goes, this is pretty grisly stuff.The best that can be said for 1968, a quarter of a century afterward, is that because it was such a terrible time it made the worst of the years that followed a little easier to bear. In that sense, those of us who remember it vividly may be lucky. Living through 1968 gave us perspective. It made us tougher.
NEWS
By MICHAEL R. LEVENE | March 4, 1991
Theirs was fought in a dry, brown place. Mine was fought in a wet, green one.FTC Theirs began with a rapid buildup. Mine grew incrementally, over a period of years.They were volunteers. I was not.Yet many comparisons are being drawn between their war, in the Persian Gulf, and mine, in Vietnam. Some seem far-fetched, some on the money. But two in particular run so against the grain of my experience that I have long suspected they are in large part myth.In September of 1969, only days removed from my two years as an Army draftee, half of that time in Vietnam, I returned to the campus where I had not quite acquired a bachelor's degree.
NEWS
By Linda White and Linda White,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1998
It was the shot seen round the world. Even today, 30 years later, the photograph of the summary street-corner execution of a Viet Cong prisoner by a South Vietnamese general remains perhaps the most enduring image of the Vietnam War.So precise was the timing of Associated Press photographer Eddie Adams that the executioner's bullet can be seen as it emerges from the head of the victim. The photograph won the Pulitzer Prize for 1969. Some say it also altered America's support for the war. And it forever changed the lives of the photographer and the subject.
NEWS
By Michael R. Levene | February 2, 1993
IT WAS my first night on guard duty -- and my last.Twenty-five years ago last Friday night, I had been in Vietnam for five months and had been stationed at the sprawling Long Binh army base northeast of Saigon for three months.Guard duty rotated among the thousands of support troops, which meant that it fell to each of us for one week at most during our year's tour of duty.On Jan. 29, 1968, shortly after my three fellow guards and I had reported to our bunker -- one of dozens spaced out along the border of the base -- for the 6 p.m.-to-6 a.m. shift, a jeep approached.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | November 18, 1992
SALISBURY -- He was a 26-year-old soldier when, on the eve of the 1968 Vietnamese New Year, tens of thousands of his fellow Communist troops simultaneously attacked hundreds of populated targets in the south."
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