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By Douglas Frantz and Jon Nordheimer and Douglas Frantz and Jon Nordheimer,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 28, 1997
Richard Weston was skeptical.The man on the telephone said he was a Louisiana teacher and had a stolen copy of the standardized test that Weston's company, Educational Testing Service, administers to teachers who want to be school principals. As the caller read off question after question, Weston's skepticism turned to alarm.Weston, a security manager for the world's largest and most influential testing organization, said that he was very interested and that a security team from the service outside Princeton, N.J., would come to see the teacher as soon as possible.
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NEWS
May 23, 2007
As any educator knows, cheating is as old as testing. So news that three students at Severna Park High School may have cheated on an Advanced Placement test is not surprising. But it's certainly disturbing. The Educational Testing Service, which administered the exam on behalf of the College Board, has rightly canceled the scores for more than 40 students in one testing room after finding that a proctor didn't do his job. Anne Arundel County school officials made the correct decision to keep those students from retaking the test tomorrow.
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NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2005
A Chinese immigrant from New York was sentenced in Baltimore yesterday for his role in what industry insiders described as one of the largest known impersonation schemes of standardized tests. Zhigang Cao, 38, received 30 months in federal prison for defrauding the Educational Testing Service (ETS) and the colleges and universities that heavily rely on the integrity of its scores. ETS, which designs, administers and scores the SAT and other entrance exams for about 13 million test takers a year, applauded the outcome.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2005
A Chinese immigrant from New York was sentenced in Baltimore yesterday for his role in what industry insiders described as one of the largest known impersonation schemes of standardized tests. Zhigang Cao, 38, received 30 months in federal prison for defrauding the Educational Testing Service (ETS) and the colleges and universities that heavily rely on the integrity of its scores. ETS, which designs, administers and scores the SAT and other entrance exams for about 13 million test takers a year, applauded the outcome.
BUSINESS
By Carol Kleiman and Carol Kleiman,Chicago Tribune | August 3, 1992
Three years ago, a shudder went through the hearts of female students and their tuition-paying parents when research by a women's advocacy group concluded that the Educational Testing Service's Scholastic Aptitude Test, or SAT, is biased against girls and women.Each year, more than 1.7 million students who want to go to college, many of them seeking scholarships, plunk down $17 to take the test. Fifty-two percent are female.A riveting study of SAT scores for verbal and mathematical skills in 1989 by Phyllis F. Rosser, director of the Equality and Testing Project in Holmdel, N.J., showed that the gap between SAT scores of females and males was 57 points, with girls averaging 878 points out of a possible 1,600 and boys averaging 935."
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | December 26, 1994
CHICAGO -- This is usually a high-anxiety season for college seniors, what with deadlines looming for getting applications to graduate school in order.But this Christmas break, many students left campus with a double dose of jitters, trapped in the middle of a multiple-choice espionage drama.Two years ago, the Graduate Record Examination, which is generally required of candidates for graduate programs, entered the electronic age.Instead of using the traditional pencil-and-paper format, students were able to take the GRE by computer, an innovation touted as being more accurate and less vulnerable to cheaters.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | February 12, 1994
Jacqueline Callier wanted to ace the Scholastic Assessment Test today, but miserable weather has put the exam on ice for her and hundreds of other students in the Baltimore area.It is the second SAT postponement for Jacqueline in three weeks. The college entrance test also was snowed out Jan. 22.The Educational Testing Service, the Princeton, N.J. company that administers the exam, was itself closed by the weather yesterday. Individual schools decide whether to offer the test. Students scheduled to take the SAT today were advised to listen to the radio to see if their test center would be open or if makeup dates had been set.For weeks, Jacqueline, a Centennial High School junior, has prepared an hour a day -- two hours a day on weekends -- for the test that many colleges require for admission.
NEWS
May 23, 2007
As any educator knows, cheating is as old as testing. So news that three students at Severna Park High School may have cheated on an Advanced Placement test is not surprising. But it's certainly disturbing. The Educational Testing Service, which administered the exam on behalf of the College Board, has rightly canceled the scores for more than 40 students in one testing room after finding that a proctor didn't do his job. Anne Arundel County school officials made the correct decision to keep those students from retaking the test tomorrow.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 15, 1993
The Educational Testing Service, creators of the examinations that give Americans the jitters -- the SAT, GRE, PSAT -- today takes a major step toward eliminating the standardized paper and pencil test with the introduction of a new computerized version of the Graduate Record Examination.Though paper and pencil will remain an option for now, by the 1996-97 school year all 400,000 students who take the GRE each year for admission to graduate school will do it on a computer.Instead of sitting in a room with hundreds of people on one of five annual test dates, students will be able to go to a computer center and take the GRE on any of several days during the week, for a total of more than 150 days a year.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1996
Allan C. Stevens, a South Carroll High School junior known for his skill on the tennis court, learned last week that he aced a different sort of match: the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT).The 17-year-old Sykesville resident earned a perfect score -- 1,600 -- on the SAT, the test most colleges use as a guideline for admissions. The news arrived in the mail Monday."Everyone got results this week, and the test was a popular topic at school," Allan said. "I wanted to tell my scores, but I wasn't eager.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin | January 22, 2005
MONDAY, the Educational Testing Service - the folks who brought us the SAT - will begin offering a new test for rising college juniors on "information and communication technology," another big step in digital fluency becoming a fourth literacy in addition to the good old 3 R's. Schools as renowned as UCLA may use it for entry to higher-level courses, community colleges to certify their graduates, and employers for hiring. All of which prompts several reactions - hyper-linked, shall we say, at Internet speed: Western civilization is over: Whatever happened to the literacy test of diagramming sentences?
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2002
HERE'S AN alternative (and slightly scary) scenario for the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program: Within five years, kids will march to their schools' computer labs to take the MSPAP tests. Even essays will be scored by computer, the results sorted, matched against the state's academic standards and returned instantaneously to schools and students. Gone are the 700 human scorers who have spent these last 10 summers poring over MSPAP essays. Gone, too, is the seven-month delay in getting results to principals and the public.
BUSINESS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2000
Betsey Hurwitz-Schwab's already long business day didn't end when her flight from Chicago arrived in Baltimore at 10 p.m. Tuesday. Ahead of her was a 2 1/2-hour drive home to Cumberland. "If there had been a flight from Baltimore, I might have gotten home by 11 p.m. instead of 1 a.m.," said Hurwitz-Schwab, human resources director for children's clothing manufacturer S. Schwab Co. Business travelers such as Hurwitz-Schwab and companies in remote corners of Maryland could find future trips easier if a new trial program to subsidize air shuttles between Baltimore-Washington International Airport and Cumberland, Hagerstown and St. Mary's County succeeds.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Weinberg and By Steve Weinberg,Special to the Sun | October 24, 1999
"The Big Test: The Secret History of the American Meritocracy," by Nicholas Lemann. Farrar, Strauss and Giroux. 368 pages. $27.Nicholas Lemann started out thinking he would probably write a history of the Educational Testing Service, the organization that markets the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) to prospective university students. Somehow, he persuaded the management at the secretive organization to open its archives to him. What he found turned out to be fascinating.But alert readers will note that the title of Lemann's new book says nothing specifically about the Educational Testing Service, and fails to mention the SAT by name.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1999
Sylvan Learning Systems Inc., the Baltimore-based provider of educational services, announced yesterday that it will spin off its computerized testing service company in order to focus on its tutoring business.Sylvan said it will sell up to 20 percent of Prometric Inc., which offers more than 2,400 kinds of tests to more than 170 clients, by early 2000. The remaining stake of Prometric will be distributed to Sylvan shareholders by next fall if the Internal Revenue Service rules that such a distribution is tax-free and no adverse business or market conditions exist for Sylvan or its stockholders.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 20, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department urged the Supreme Court yesterday to reject an appeal by prominent Maryland lobbyist Bruce C. Bereano, arguing that his conviction for mail fraud raised no significant legal issues worth the court's time.Asked by the court to spell out its views on the case, the department said that a series of challenges by Bereano "lack merit and do not warrant this court's review."Bereano's appeal of his 1994 conviction offers the justices their first chance to analyze a broad 1988 federal law that made it a crime to use the postal system to deprive anyone of "a right to honest services."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Weinberg and By Steve Weinberg,Special to the Sun | October 24, 1999
"The Big Test: The Secret History of the American Meritocracy," by Nicholas Lemann. Farrar, Strauss and Giroux. 368 pages. $27.Nicholas Lemann started out thinking he would probably write a history of the Educational Testing Service, the organization that markets the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) to prospective university students. Somehow, he persuaded the management at the secretive organization to open its archives to him. What he found turned out to be fascinating.But alert readers will note that the title of Lemann's new book says nothing specifically about the Educational Testing Service, and fails to mention the SAT by name.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | April 15, 1994
Educational Testing Services, the nation's largest test provider, announced yesterday that it will invest up to $5.5 million in Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. and make the Columbia-based company its worldwide partner in computer-based testing.The Princeton, N.J.-based nonprofit organization said it had signed Sylvan to a 10-year contract under which the publicly traded Maryland company would adapt several of ETS' most frequently administered tests so that they can be taken by computer.ETS administers the tests usually required for entrance into college and post-graduate schools as well as professional tests.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1997
Newly released SAT scores show Howard County students earned an average of six points less on last year's exam than they did the year before -- the first drop in several years, school officials said yesterday.Those results came after months of delays in getting the standardized test results. Students and parents are still waiting for scores on the Comprehensive Test for Basic Skills (CTBS) and the Test of Cognitive Skills (TCS) -- given in March -- because of unexpected scoring glitches, said Leslie Wilson, supervisor of school testing.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 30, 1997
Over the past decade, the Educational Testing Service of Princeton, N.J., has transformed itself from a small nonprofit educational institution into the world's largest testing company, administering 9 million yearly examinations that help determine the future of millions of people trying to get into good schools or professions.It has quietly grown into a multinational operation, complete with for-profit subsidiaries, a reserve fund of $91 million and revenue last year of $411 million.As it celebrates its 50th anniversary this year, ETS has come under fire not only for its failure to address increased incidents of cheating and fraud, but also for what its critics say is its transformation into a highly competitive business operation.
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