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By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | February 11, 1992
If Tom Paolino were grading the state's new school performance testing program, he'd flunk it.Paolino, president of the Teachers Association of Anne Arundel County, told state lawmakers Friday that the year-old testing program is diverting attention and scarce state dollars away from classroom instruction.Anne Arundel County schools spent $1.1 million last year trainingadministrators and teachers to administer the Maryland Schools Performance Program tests, coaching students and manipulating their scores, Paolino said.
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SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | July 27, 2013
If this were not such an imperfect world, today's Hall of Fame induction ceremony in Cooperstown, N.Y., almost certainly would have been one of the most dynamic and exciting in the history of baseball's grand old reliquary. Instead, it will be something else altogether. Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens, who presumably would have been first-ballot inductees this year had they not been implicated in the sport's performance-enhancement scandal, might have to wait until a human walks on Mars to get serious consideration.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | September 24, 2008
Maryland school officials said yesterday that nearly nine out of 10 students in the current senior class have passed the High School Assessments and predicted that no student will fail to graduate because of the state's requirements. "There is no reason why any student will be denied a diploma because of the HSAs," said Leslie Wilson, who heads the state's testing program. Wilson said there are many programs in place to help students meet academic standards that have been set as graduation requirements for the first time next spring.
NEWS
By Renee A. Foose | February 14, 2013
There has been much recent debate about Race to the Top (RTTT) and its efficacy in improving K-12 education. RTTT was a competitive federal grant that challenged states to pursue innovative reforms on a rapid timeline from 2010 through 2014. The reforms are designed to ensure that every student is prepared with the requisite skills to succeed in college or in a livable-wage career. Maryland, like other RTTT-winning states, is using its grant ($250 million) to fund a new curriculum and a controversial teacher evaluation model that incorporates student growth, as measured in part by state test results.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2001
WILL MSPAP be zapped? Not anytime soon. The Maryland School Performance Assessment Program has too much support in the right places to be easily discarded or seriously amended. It has a track record of more than a decade, a major accomplishment in the politicized world of public education. And it has the ardent backing of state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick and other top educators, numerous business leaders and Walter Sondheim Jr., who is such an institution that he has a personal listing in the yellow pages.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1996
All 4,000 midshipmen could take LSD today and be clean in time for a routine drug test tomorrow because the powerful hallucinogenic drug disappears so quickly from the bloodstream, drug analysts say.That could explain why Midshipman Jason A. Harloff, who pleaded guilty to drug charges Thursday, and other midshipmen suspected of using LSD escaped detection by the Naval Academy's random testing program.In a court martial, Harloff of Fairport, N.Y. pleaded guilty to possession, conspiracy, use and transfer of LSD, as part of an agreement with Navy lawyers.
NEWS
February 4, 1995
From the beginning, Maryland's new auto emission testing program has been plagued by public resentment, lack of advance information, faulty technical preparation and a rush-rush deadline mentality that allowed little room for correcting problems before it was imposed on state motorists.Gov. Parris N. Glendening has shown a commendable responsiveness to public concerns, and the admirable ability to compromise reasonably with legislative leadership, in crafting a new exhaust testing program that will alleviate many auto owner fears while still reducing air pollution in the Baltimore-Washington region.
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 1995
THERE IS MORE than meets the eye to many jobs. Often, what the public sees is very different from what the job actually requires. Just ask Phyllis Coffman, deli manager at Martin's Food Store in Eldersburg.Late last spring, Ms. Coffman participated in a nationwide testing program for deli managers. The test is in booklet form and covers all aspects of a deli manager's job, from sanitation regulations and employee management to questions about the products sold in the deli.The results of the test were published in the September issue of Progressive Grocer magazine.
NEWS
January 18, 1991
Unless state officials expand the current auto emissions testing program to include six rural counties, Maryland could lose millions of dollars in federal highway funds. Increased population and motor vehicle use have rendered once-bucolic areas of the state as vulnerable to pollution as more populous cities and towns, where emission testing is already required.Governor Schaefer is expected to introduce legislation indefinitely extending the seven-year-old emissions testing program, which expires this year.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | January 6, 1995
Teamwork is a concept that the District 31 General Assembly delegation doesn't seem to talk about much.With the beginning of the 1995 legislative session less than a week away, the members say they have a number of ideas they hope to work on individually but little they want to do together.They don't even agree on what to do about the one issue that concerns all of them: a more stringent auto emissions testing program that was to begin Jan. 1.Democratic Sen. Phillip C. Jimeno, who believes the program costs motorists too much money and time said he will submit legislation that would stop the new program to allow the General Assembly to study it further and possibly revise it. Meanwhile, he said, the state would continue use the simpler, cheaper system.
EXPLORE
February 22, 2012
From The Aegis dated Feb. 26, 1987: A month after Harford County recovered from a snowfall that dropped almost 20 inches of snow, Mother Nature struck again with a 15-inch snowstorm that led to one death and at least two injuries. The heavy, wet snow fell in just about seven hours. Raymond Colton, 53, of Edgewood, died from an apparent heart attack while shoveling snow at his home. In Aberdeen, a man lost two fingers in a snowblower accident and a Street man broke his leg when the bulldozer he was using toppled backward and pinned him to the ground.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | September 24, 2008
Maryland school officials said yesterday that nearly nine out of 10 students in the current senior class have passed the High School Assessments and predicted that no student will fail to graduate because of the state's requirements. "There is no reason why any student will be denied a diploma because of the HSAs," said Leslie Wilson, who heads the state's testing program. Wilson said there are many programs in place to help students meet academic standards that have been set as graduation requirements for the first time next spring.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 4, 2008
About one-third of America's eighth-grade students, and about one in four high school seniors, are proficient writers, according to results of a nationwide test released yesterday. The test, administered last year, showed that there were modest increases in the writing skills of low-performing students since the last time a similar exam was given, in 2002. But the skills of high-performing eighth- and 12th-graders remained flat or declined. Girls far outperformed boys in the test, with 41 percent of eighth-grade girls scoring at or above the proficient level, compared with 20 percent of eighth-grade boys.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | January 24, 2007
Wendy Nelson's two daughters, Carley and Molly, get A's and B's in school, but they do not do as well when they take tests. "When they get to taking tests, they do very poorly," Nelson said. "We just think they study the wrong things. I think they take the wrong kinds of notes." That's why the Nelson daughters are taking a series of classes called the Stressless Tests Program, designed to help them do just as well on tests as they do in the classroom. The program consists of four classes, held in the evenings at local schools.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2005
WASHINGTON - Steroid use by players in the National Football League may be more widespread than tests have indicated, according to congressional staff members investigating the league's drug-testing program. The House Government Reform Committee has been conducting interviews with "credible insiders" as part of an investigation leading to tomorrow's hearing on the league's steroid policy. As a result of those interviews - along with the recent report that three Carolina Panthers purchased steroids before the Super Bowl in 2004 - committee staff members say they are concerned that steroid testing may understate the problem.
NEWS
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. - In an effort to restore fans' confidence in the game, Major League Baseball announced yesterday a tougher policy on steroids and performance-enhancing drugs that calls for every player to be tested at least once a year and for punishment of first-time offenders. "I've been saying for some time that my goal for this industry is zero tolerance regarding steroids," said baseball commissioner Bud Selig. "The agreement [with the players union] ... is an important step toward achieving that goal.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Evening Sun Staff | January 2, 1991
Within the next few weeks, state government workers with safety-related jobs could find themselves being summoned for a drug test under a new Maryland policy.Some agencies may begin randomly testing those employees for illegal drug use later this month or in early February, said Catherine Austin, assistant secretary of the state Personnel Department.The testing program, considered by some to be among the toughest in the nation, had been delayed for several months because of a lengthier-than-anticipated training program, changes in the proposed penalty for drug use, requests for public hearings and the time needed to determine how to best administer the testing.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2001
BOWIE -- Critics of Maryland's elementary and middle school testing program said last night that the state needs to make major changes to the exams to improve teaching and learning. "There is something wrong with these tests," said Zalee Harris, a Prince George's County education activist. "This can't go on." About 40 parents and teachers gathered at Bowie State University for last night's meeting, dubbed a "Maryland Education Summit." It was sponsored by two Republican politicians, Del. Janet Greenip from Anne Arundel County and Audrey E. Scott, vice chairwoman of the Prince George's County Council.
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