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NEWS
November 2, 1993
Dr. Nasser Javadpour, head of the urology department at Maryland General Hospital and an expert on testicular cancer, died of cancer Oct. 26 at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 56.Dr. Javadpour, who developed a substitute bladder for cancer patients, maintained homes in Baltimore and in Daytona Beach, Fla.He was a professor of medicine at the University of Maryland medical school from 1985 until 1991 when he left to head the Division of Urology at Maryland General.It was while he was associated with the University of Maryland Hospital and Medical School as a urologic oncologist that he discovered the biological marker for testicular seminoma.
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FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | January 17, 2013
Lance Armstrong's well-orchestrated apology tour has brought back a bad memory: all the wasted hours I spent reading his book, "It's Not About the Bike. " I was one of many readers captivated by his dramatic tale: hot-headed young rider gets felled by testicular cancer, and battles back -- against disease and doubters -- to win the Tour de France. It made me a huge fan of Armstrong and the grueling race that takes cyclists around France.  But in light of the overwhelming evidence that Armstrong was not clean when he won the tour a record seven times (and seven straight)
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FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | January 17, 2013
Lance Armstrong's well-orchestrated apology tour has brought back a bad memory: all the wasted hours I spent reading his book, "It's Not About the Bike. " I was one of many readers captivated by his dramatic tale: hot-headed young rider gets felled by testicular cancer, and battles back -- against disease and doubters -- to win the Tour de France. It made me a huge fan of Armstrong and the grueling race that takes cyclists around France.  But in light of the overwhelming evidence that Armstrong was not clean when he won the tour a record seven times (and seven straight)
SPORTS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2012
Lance Armstrong won the Revolution 3 Half-Full Triathlon at Centennial Park in Howard County on Sunday, finishing the 70-mile race in just under 4 hours, 11 minutes. The effort by the famous cyclist and embattled seven-time Tour de France winner in the combined swimming, biking and running event, organized by the Ulman Cancer Fund for Young Adults to raise money for cancer awareness, brought him in more than 18 minutes ahead of the second place finisher, Louis Therien of Quebec. Sharon Schmidt-Mongrain of Lafayette Hill, Pa., was the top female finisher in just under 4 hours, 54 minutes.
FEATURES
October 11, 2007
Americans with disabilities smoke more than everyone else, according to the first national study to compare smoking rates between the two groups. About one in four disabled people is a smoker, compared with about one in five among the nondisabled, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported last week. More people with disabilities also said they had seen a doctor or nurse recently, and had been advised to quit cigarettes, the CDC study found. Having such national data is helpful, but the results aren't surprising, said Kenneth Warner, a leading tobacco researcher who is dean of the University of Michigan School of Public Health.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 7, 2004
When I remember my suffering, my happiness is doubled," sings the love-smitten Cavalier to his Puritan bride-to-be. "My joy is even dearer to me." It's just one of the melodically sumptuous moments in Bellini's opera I Puritani, an 1835 masterpiece of the lyrical style known as bel canto that will be performed this month by the Baltimore Opera Company for the first time. Those particular words must have an extra resonance for the tenor who will sing them here, Gregory Kunde. Ten years ago, he was diagnosed with testicular cancer.
SPORTS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2012
Lance Armstrong won the Revolution 3 Half-Full Triathlon at Centennial Park in Howard County on Sunday, finishing the 70-mile race in just under 4 hours, 11 minutes. The effort by the famous cyclist and embattled seven-time Tour de France winner in the combined swimming, biking and running event, organized by the Ulman Cancer Fund for Young Adults to raise money for cancer awareness, brought him in more than 18 minutes ahead of the second place finisher, Louis Therien of Quebec. Sharon Schmidt-Mongrain of Lafayette Hill, Pa., was the top female finisher in just under 4 hours, 54 minutes.
NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | August 26, 2001
CYCLIST Lance Armstrong's stirring third straight victory in the Tour de France last month has given new fund-raising incentive to Columbia cyclist and triathlete Robert Vigorito, founder and director of the annual Columbia Triathlon. Vigorito, a University of Maryland medical researcher who counts Armstrong as a friend, wants to raise $10,000 from local sources by April for donation to the Texan's annual Ride for the Roses benefit in Austin to benefit testicular cancer research. This year's event raised more than $1.2 million.
NEWS
By Abby Foster and Abby Foster,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2003
Stephen Sroka has wanted to bike across America since he was in eighth grade. Next month, he will realize that dream while paying tribute to two brothers who were stricken with cancer. Sroka, a 21-year-old Baltimore native, will embark on his more than 4,000-mile ride June 21. Along the way, he will be raising money for the Ulman Cancer Fund for Young Adults, an Ellicott City organization. His goal is to raise $100,000. His affiliation with the Ulman fund arose from his friendship with John and Matthew Majoros.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | October 11, 1993
A photo caption in The Sun yesterday incorrectly identified two participants at a conference on the cancer-causing drug DES. Shown above are Yvonne Shewmaker and her daughter, LuEllen Blum, a victim of DES-caused cancer. They were misidentified as Minnie Ann Klone and her daughter, Kathy Coburn, shown below.The Sun regrets the errors.Minnie Ann Klone is working on it, but she still feels responsible for the death of her daughter.Thirty-five years ago, Mrs. Klone took DES, thought then to be a wonder drug that would prevent miscarriage.
SPORTS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2012
Lance Armstrong tried to shed his serious public persona Saturday in Ellicott City by poking fun at the elephant in a room about half-filled with triathletes: his lifetime competitive sporting ban. His host, Brock Yetso, president of the Ulman Cancer Fund, asked the recently dethroned seven-time Tour de France winner why he planned to participate Sunday in the Rev3 Half Full Triathlon at Centennial Park. "You have done a lot of races. … Why are you here? You could race, arguably, any race in the world," Yetso said.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | January 6, 2010
Former Oriole Roberto Alomar will find out today whether his stellar career as one of the best second basemen in the history of baseball will outweigh one ugly moment in 1996 that has scarred his reputation ever since. Alomar's name appeared on the Hall of Fame ballot for the first time this past November, and he is considered the strongest candidate to gain induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame when the results of the balloting are announced by the Hall and the Baseball Writers' Association of America.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | February 24, 2009
The decision to yank Annapolis sailor Farrah Hall from the Beijing Olympic team in favor of Nancy Rios never passed the sniff test. Lame excuses by US Sailing about its unilateral ruling in October 2007 only made things worse. Now, a panel convened by the U.S. Olympic Committee has found that Hall was judged by a kangaroo court that ignored federal law and followed its own rules that were, at best, written in the dirt with a stick. In a 23-page ruling, the hearing panel called the situation created by US Sailing "a procedural nightmare" that could have been avoided if Hall had been allowed to defend herself.
FEATURES
October 11, 2007
Americans with disabilities smoke more than everyone else, according to the first national study to compare smoking rates between the two groups. About one in four disabled people is a smoker, compared with about one in five among the nondisabled, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported last week. More people with disabilities also said they had seen a doctor or nurse recently, and had been advised to quit cigarettes, the CDC study found. Having such national data is helpful, but the results aren't surprising, said Kenneth Warner, a leading tobacco researcher who is dean of the University of Michigan School of Public Health.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 7, 2004
When I remember my suffering, my happiness is doubled," sings the love-smitten Cavalier to his Puritan bride-to-be. "My joy is even dearer to me." It's just one of the melodically sumptuous moments in Bellini's opera I Puritani, an 1835 masterpiece of the lyrical style known as bel canto that will be performed this month by the Baltimore Opera Company for the first time. Those particular words must have an extra resonance for the tenor who will sing them here, Gregory Kunde. Ten years ago, he was diagnosed with testicular cancer.
NEWS
By Mary Beth Regan and Mary Beth Regan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 16, 2003
Dave Gensler is a typical guy, but he knows that typical-guy behavior can be a killer. Three years ago, the youthful 44-year-old suffered a heart attack. Fortunately, his heart was not extensively damaged. But his doctors warned that next time he might not be so lucky. Today, Gensler is dedicated to good health. He eats fresh foods, exercises regularly and checks his vital signs weekly. He just ran a 6.8-mile leg of the Baltimore Marathon in a relay with friends from the Johns Hopkins Heart Health center.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | June 18, 1997
Los Angeles Dodgers outfielder Brett Butler knows what Eric Davis is going through. He had surgery to remove an inflamed tonsil last year and woke up to find out that he had throat cancer.The diagnosis was not a death sentence. Butler underwent successful treatment and is back in the Dodgers' lineup, a member of a growing list of major-league players who have survived cancer to play again.Reliever Scott Radinsky found out in 1995 he had lymphoma, but returned from chemotherapy to re-establish himself as a quality pitcher.
NEWS
June 9, 1993
Stigma of LabelsThe timely and otherwise well written article by Michael Ollove in The Sun May 30 on mental health benefits, stigma and discrimination of people with mental illnesses, had three glaring flaws in it.While the majority of the article accurately described the current and historical denigrating, stigmatizing and ignoring of mental illness as a disease, Mr. Ollove was guilty of just such stigmatizing himself.He first referred to Mr. Crane as "a schizophrenic," then he referred to Ms. Hlatky as "a 49 year-old Dundalk woman diagnosed as manic-depressive," and lastly, referred to Ms. Kadis, "a 39 year-old manic-depressive."
NEWS
By Abby Foster and Abby Foster,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2003
Stephen Sroka has wanted to bike across America since he was in eighth grade. Next month, he will realize that dream while paying tribute to two brothers who were stricken with cancer. Sroka, a 21-year-old Baltimore native, will embark on his more than 4,000-mile ride June 21. Along the way, he will be raising money for the Ulman Cancer Fund for Young Adults, an Ellicott City organization. His goal is to raise $100,000. His affiliation with the Ulman fund arose from his friendship with John and Matthew Majoros.
NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | August 26, 2001
CYCLIST Lance Armstrong's stirring third straight victory in the Tour de France last month has given new fund-raising incentive to Columbia cyclist and triathlete Robert Vigorito, founder and director of the annual Columbia Triathlon. Vigorito, a University of Maryland medical researcher who counts Armstrong as a friend, wants to raise $10,000 from local sources by April for donation to the Texan's annual Ride for the Roses benefit in Austin to benefit testicular cancer research. This year's event raised more than $1.2 million.
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