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NEWS
By Elise Armacost | August 10, 1997
WHAT, ANOTHER test?That was my first thought when Baltimore County School Superintendent Anthony G. Marchione said last week that he is getting ready to release the results of a first-ever standardized assessment of early elementary students' ability to read.Let's see, we already have the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program, which kids take in third, fifth and eighth grades.Starting in seventh grade Maryland students take four "functional" tests of basic skills, which they must pass in order to graduate.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
This afternoon, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said, her administration will release the results of "sophisticated ground penetrating radar" tests conducted in the days after the landslide on East 26th Street. The information is critical in determining how soon displaced residents can return to their homes, she said. "We are in process of gathering information so that can inform the public about all of the actions that my administration took before the collapse as well as provide a thorough assessment of the structural integrity of the area both currently and leading up to the collapse," Rawlings-Blake said.
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SPORTS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2013
Twenty-seven horses at the Bowie Training Center have been isolated after a filly became sick and had to be euthanized Saturday, according to the Maryland Jockey Club. It was suspected that the horse might have equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1), but the preliminary test results came back negative Saturday, according to Mike Gathagan, vice president of communications for the Maryland Jockey Club. The horse in question, a 4-year-old filly named Clonmeen Lass, owned by Annette Eubanks, had been exhibiting "colic-like symptoms" for a number of days, according to Dr. David Zipf, the Maryland Racing Commission's chief veterinarian.
NEWS
RECORD STAFF REPORT | January 16, 2014
Aberdeen and Havre de Grace high schools will be getting some major recognition today (Friday) for their students' performance on Advanced Placement examinations and academic achievement. The National Math and Science Initiative will recognize Aberdeen High School as the organization's School of the Year for its outstanding academic performance in the 2012-13 school year. The math and science organization will also announce the annual results of its program focused on serving military families for both Aberdeen and Havre de Grace high schools, during events the schools at 9 a.m. and 12:45 p.m., respectively.
NEWS
March 27, 1992
After all the arcane educational verbiage about "learning outcomes," "scale scores," and "response ratings," the bottom line in the scores recorded on Maryland's new student-competency tests is this: 30 to 35 percent of Maryland school children are performing at barely adequate levels and 40 percent are performing below adequate levels. About a quarter are doing fairly well, but only about 5 percent are performing at truly high levels.The State Department of Education is to be commended for setting rigorous standards, for developing a new set of tests that document whether students are meeting those standards, for making the results public and for setting about to improve instruction.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2000
An attorney representing Ravens defensive tackle Larry Webster said his client's recent positive drug test results from the NFL were in error, and that two additional tests conducted by private laboratories were negative. Webster, 31, has been suspended from the league indefinitely pending an appeal. His lawyer, Mike Baird from the Chicago-based firm of Stotis and Baird, said the league took a urine sample from Webster on Feb. 23 and notified him 30 days later that he was suspended because of cocaine use. Baird adamantly denied that his client had ever used cocaine and released test results from a toxicology report from Associated Pathologists Laboratories in Las Vegas, which were negative.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane and Gregory P. Kane,Sun Staff Writer | November 17, 1994
The investigation into the stabbing death nearly two years ago of a 14-year-old Glen Burnie girl is in a "holding pattern" until test results come back on a new batch of DNA samples, county police said yesterday.Lt. Harry Collier, the commander of the crimes against persons section of the county Police Department, said the 35 samples are from new suspects in the Lisa Haenel case. He expects to have laboratory reports in January. The 35 were suspects early in the case, but police did not have the resources to collect the samples until a task force was formed in September.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2004
State inspectors have found evidence of more widespread problems with laboratory work conducted at Maryland General Hospital, including faulty tests for Legionella bacteria done for patients at a Northwest Baltimore nursing home. According to a complaint received by the state, 11 sputum specimens from patients sat in a hospital refrigerator for two to three weeks last year, even though the tests were supposed to be initiated within 24 hours. Hospital lab staff didn't perform the tests promptly because "they didn't have the medium," said state Health Secretary Nelson J. Sabatini, referring to the substance used to detect the presence of the virus.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | February 27, 1991
Local school superintendents are urging the state school board to delay for a year publishing the scores from a new test to be given to thousands of Maryland students this May.But they met a skeptical reception yesterday from board members who cited freedom of information concerns and the need to keep the new testing program on schedule.The new tests, known as "criterion referenced tests," measure actual student performance, based on objective standards of how much a student knows and how the student uses that knowledge.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2001
Baffled by "wild swings" in scores, Maryland education officials announced yesterday that they will delay releasing results of the state's annual elementary and middle school exams for more than a month. "There are a lot of scores which we just can't explain," said Nancy S. Grasmick, the state superintendent of schools. "I don't want to release scores that I don't have confidence in, so we need to take the time to go back and look at the scores again. We need to ensure the integrity of the exams."
NEWS
December 20, 2013
Baltimore school officials are putting the best face possible on what can only be called a disappointing performance by city students on a rigorous national exam that tests proficiency in reading and math. Though city students scored small gains in reading, only 14 percent of fourth-graders and 16 percent of eighth-graders were performing at grade-level, while math scores remained flat or declined slightly. Just 13 percent of city eighth-graders and 19 percent of fourth-graders scored proficient on the math exam.
SPORTS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2013
Twenty-seven horses at the Bowie Training Center have been isolated after a filly became sick and had to be euthanized Saturday, according to the Maryland Jockey Club. It was suspected that the horse might have equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1), but the preliminary test results came back negative Saturday, according to Mike Gathagan, vice president of communications for the Maryland Jockey Club. The horse in question, a 4-year-old filly named Clonmeen Lass, owned by Annette Eubanks, had been exhibiting "colic-like symptoms" for a number of days, according to Dr. David Zipf, the Maryland Racing Commission's chief veterinarian.
NEWS
By George Liebmann | September 24, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley has taken on the road to Charlotte, N.C., and to Iowa his claim that Maryland's schools are "Number One. " The annual ratings by Education Week are held to justify the hundreds of millions in additional Thornton Commission spending that are at the root of state and local budget problems. These funds have been squandered on the rapidly escalating costs of "Cadillac" health insurance policies for teachers and on lockstep seniority increases not accorded other public and private work forces — while the state maintains certification requirements of 30 credit hours of mind-numbing education courses that exclude about 95 percent of its college graduates from the public teaching force.
EXPLORE
July 31, 2012
Scores achieved by Harford County students in the latest round of testing designed to assess the performance of teachers and the school system mostly show continued incremental improvement, with many of the county's elementary schools finishing well above state and regional averages. This is a positive development, and no doubt reflects a substantial effort on the part of teachers, administrators and other school staff members, as the new head of elementary education for the county noted last week.
NEWS
Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2012
For a decade, the news from the city schools was good. Buildings might be dilapidated, deficits might bring schools to the brink of bankruptcy, and superintendents might be fired, but every summer, educators released test results standing next to charts that showed steady improvement. Baltimore was no longer the worst school system in the state. But for the past three years, progress — as measured by test scores — has virtually stalled. Critics of CEO Andrés Alonso say the lack of continued improvement shows that he has failed to make the nuts and bolts of teaching his focus.
NEWS
March 13, 2012
This week, schools in Baltimore City and across Maryland are administering the state standardized tests in reading and math for students in the third through eighth grades. There's a lot riding on the outcome. Among other things, the test results will help determine how much students are learning, whether the schools they attend are improving or falling behind, and perhaps even whether some individual teachers and principals keep their jobs. The test will also play a significant role in decisions about which schools are allowed to remain open and what their level of funding will be. With so much at stake, it's vital to ensure the reliability of the test results.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | December 29, 2006
If you're wondering why the Major League Baseball Players Association disagreed with this week's appellate court ruling that will allow the Justice Department to use the confiscated results of confidential steroid testing in future prosecutions, you need only to look at the recent comments of the lawyer for embattled superstar Barry Bonds. Michael Rains hinted Wednesday that he has a government source who cast doubt on whether prosecutors will gain anything from the test results that would help in their investigation into whether Bonds committed perjury when he told the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative grand jury that he never knowingly used steroids.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SOURCE: Carroll County Board of EducationStaff Writer | June 10, 1993
Carroll County schools performed better than the stat average -- but still far below standards the state would like to see in 1995 and 2000 -- on the Maryland School Performance Assessments.The test results for the county were released at yesterday's Board of Education meeting.The statewide test is designed to determine how well students apply their knowledge, said Brian Lockard, deputy superintendent of schools in Carroll. It measures how well a school or school system -- rather than an individual student -- is performing.
NEWS
June 7, 2011
A report that top officials at the state health lab shredded hundreds of blood test results for lead-poisoned children earlier this year because they couldn't be bothered with keeping up with requests for the paperwork raises serious questions about the department's record-keeping ability. State health department Secretary Joshua M. Sharfstein, who took over the agency in January, says the two supervisors responsible for the unauthorized dump of information are no longer in their positions and that the test results were all retrieved from electronic data in deleted computer files.
NEWS
April 4, 2011
Baltimore school officials ought to take a close look at a recent USA Today investigation that found more than 100 schools in the District of Columbia had extraordinarily high numbers of erasures on standardized tests on which wrong answers had been erased and changed to right ones. Just because a cheating scandal happened there doesn't mean we have one here, and Baltimore officials have reacted more swiftly and decisively than their Washington counterparts did to the few instances of questionable test scores we have seen here.
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