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By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1998
Go to the top law or medical school in the country, and you'll study under lawyers and doctors at the top of their field.Similarly, the Navy thinks students at one of the country's premier military schools, the Naval Academy, need more exposure to the top performers of their chosen profession.That's why Cmdr. Rob Niewoehner, 39, is leaving one of the Navy's most enviable jobs -- lead test pilot for the controversial new F/A-18 Super Hornet jet fighter -- to become one of the academy's new "permanent military professors."
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2011
Robert Wilson McKee, a career naval officer and World War II veteran, died Nov. 12 of respiratory failure at the Fairhaven retirement community in Sykesville. The former Ellicott City resident was 95. Mr. McKee was born in Pittsburgh and raised in Columbus, Ohio, where he graduated in 1933 from East High School. After earning a bachelor's degree in civil engineering in 1937 from Ohio State University, Mr. McKee went to work for the Corning Glass Co. in Corning, N.Y., as plant manager.
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NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Sheridan Lyons and Dan Fesperman and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2001
A reputed leader of a space alien cult in the suburbs of Carroll County was charged yesterday along with three associates in an alleged murder-for-hire scheme. State police allege that Scott Caruthers, 56, plotted last month with his wife, Dashielle Lashra, 42, live-in companion Dulsa Naedek, 42, and friend David S. Pearl, 46, to hire a man to kill former business associate David Gable and three other men in exchange for an estimated $110,000 worth of stock. Police said the plot was foiled by the intended hit man. Court documents identified him as Amir Tabassi, who sometimes served as Caruthers' bodyguard.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | December 1, 2006
Thomas E. Lloyd, a former test pilot who became a Howard County lawyer and played a key role in the local government's transition to charter home rule in the late 1960s, died of a heart attack Nov. 24 at Howard County General Hospital. The Ellicott City resident was 83. Born in Pittsburg, Kan., he served in the Navy as a fighter pilot during World War II and the Korean War. Family members said he made numerous landings aboard carriers, including the USS Leyte, Coral Sea, Essex, FDR and Midway.
NEWS
By Paul Shread and Paul Shread,Staff writer | May 24, 1991
During her four years at the U.S. Naval Academy, Midshipman Julie Hansen of Edgewater has followed an active but traditional path.Shesoon may break tradition by becoming one of the Navy's first female F-18 fighter pilots.Hansen, who will graduate from the academy next week, will attendflight school next February in Pensacola, Fla. She could earn her wings in mid-1993, and she hopes to fly F-18s.Her cause may be helped by legislation introduced by U.S. Representatives Patricia Schroeder, D-Colo.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | December 1, 2006
Thomas E. Lloyd, a former test pilot who became a Howard County lawyer and played a key role in the local government's transition to charter home rule in the late 1960s, died of a heart attack Nov. 24 at Howard County General Hospital. The Ellicott City resident was 83. Born in Pittsburg, Kan., he served in the Navy as a fighter pilot during World War II and the Korean War. Family members said he made numerous landings aboard carriers, including the USS Leyte, Coral Sea, Essex, FDR and Midway.
NEWS
October 29, 2004
Michael Grant, a renowned classical historian, numismatist and author who examined ancient coins as a social record of the Roman Empire and wrote scholarly yet highly readable histories of Rome, Greece and Israel, died Oct. 4. He was 89. Mr. Grant, who lived in Italy for many years but returned to London in April, died in a London hospital of unspecified causes. The prolific scholar wrote and edited more than 50 books of nonfiction and translation, beginning with his Cambridge thesis on Roman coins.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 10, 1999
OJAI, Calif. -- Charles P. "Pete" Conrad, the Apollo 12 astronaut who was the third man to set foot on the moon, died Thursday night after losing control of his motorcycle on a mountain road near Ojai, authorities said.Mr. Conrad, a Huntington Beach resident whose lifelong aerospace career started with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in 1962, died at 5: 07 p.m. at Ojai Valley Hospital, five hours after crashing his 1996 Harley, said James Baroni, a Ventura County deputy coroner.
NEWS
July 12, 1995
Allen Warfield Jr.Test pilotAllen Jack Warfield Jr., a retired test pilot, died July 2 of cancer at his Wyman Park residence. He was 76.Known as "Baltimore Jack" as chief of the Air Force flight operations and acceptance division at the old Glenn L. Martin plant in Middle River, Mr. Warfield was responsible for accepting or rejecting every warplane that rolled off the assembly line.Mr. Warfield worked as a test pilot from 1948 until his retirement in 1963 as a lieutenant colonel. Among the planes he tested were the B57B Night Intruder, once the nation's fastest jet bomber, and the Flying Wing.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | May 8, 1995
Although Robert W. Fausel trained as a pursuit pilot, he never flew in combat -- at least not officially.But as a civilian test pilot, the 81-year-old Towson resident paved the way for those who did in World War II by testing the hottest airplanes built by Curtiss-Wright.It was in C-W's P-40 Tomahawk (made famous by the Flying Tigers in China early in the war) that Mr. Fausel set a world dive record of 661 mph in April 1940 at Wright Field, Ohio, in a test to meet military contract requirements.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY | January 29, 2006
While listening to a panel of Volvo Ocean Race skippers and big-wigs do damage-control at a news conference last week, it occurred to me that this year's round-the-world race feels a lot like drag racing. Those low-to-the-ground land vehicles go more than 330 mph and break speed records. The cars are on the forefront of design. New technology is tested right out there on the race track. Of course, there are accidents. "Anytime you are on the ragged edge of trying to get the car to get to the top of its performance, there are things that can happen," said Anthony Vestal, the media relations director for the National Hot Rod Association.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | December 7, 2005
Vice Adm. William Porter Lawrence, a Vietnam prisoner of war, former U.S. Naval Academy superintendent and father of an astronaut, died of natural causes Friday at his home in Crownsville. He was 75. Admiral Lawrence had an illustrious 34-year career in the Navy, beginning as a test pilot after he graduated from the Naval Academy and ending as the deputy chief of naval operations. But he was most famous for his perseverance during six years as an American POW during the Vietnam War, when he endured torture at the hands of the North Vietnamese.
NEWS
October 29, 2004
Michael Grant, a renowned classical historian, numismatist and author who examined ancient coins as a social record of the Roman Empire and wrote scholarly yet highly readable histories of Rome, Greece and Israel, died Oct. 4. He was 89. Mr. Grant, who lived in Italy for many years but returned to London in April, died in a London hospital of unspecified causes. The prolific scholar wrote and edited more than 50 books of nonfiction and translation, beginning with his Cambridge thesis on Roman coins.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,ORLANDO SENTINEL | October 5, 2004
ORLANDO, Fla. - Gordon Cooper, one of the original "Mercury Seven" astronauts, died yesterday, NASA announced. He was 77. Cooper flew the sixth and final flight of the Mercury program - in a spacecraft known as Faith 7 - in May 1963, becoming the first astronaut to sleep in space during more than 34 hours and 22 orbits of Earth. He later commanded Gemini V in 1965. Cooper's death leaves only three living Mercury astronauts: John Glenn, Scott Carpenter and Wally Schirra. The men, selected in the spring of 1959 as the inaugural class of astronauts, were instant celebrities, girding to win the space race against the Soviet Union.
NEWS
September 30, 2004
NATIONAL Patriot Act ruled unconstitutional A federal judge ruled yesterday that a portion of the Patriot Act is unconstitutional, the first time one of the antiterrorism law's controversial police surveillance provisions, has been struck down. U.S. District Court Judge Victor Marrero said so-called national security letters - which allow the FBI to demand certain businesses release customer records without a judge's approval and without telling anyone - violate the First and Fourth amendments.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2004
If all goes well, a gangly-looking airplane will lift off today from the Mojave Desert in California in the first private attempt to put a man in space. After an hourlong climb to about 50,000 feet, the twin-fuselage jet White Knight will release the payload strapped to its belly - a three-seat rocket ship that looks as if it was torn from a Flash Gordon comic. As crowds watch from the desert, the rocket's pilot and sole occupant - Mike Melvill, 62, a civilian test pilot - will fire his engine for 80 seconds and soar 62 miles to the edge of space.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2011
Robert Wilson McKee, a career naval officer and World War II veteran, died Nov. 12 of respiratory failure at the Fairhaven retirement community in Sykesville. The former Ellicott City resident was 95. Mr. McKee was born in Pittsburgh and raised in Columbus, Ohio, where he graduated in 1933 from East High School. After earning a bachelor's degree in civil engineering in 1937 from Ohio State University, Mr. McKee went to work for the Corning Glass Co. in Corning, N.Y., as plant manager.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Sheridan Lyons and Dan Fesperman and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2001
A reputed leader of a space alien cult in the suburbs of Carroll County was charged yesterday along with three associates in an alleged murder-for-hire scheme. State police allege that Scott Caruthers, 56, plotted last month with his wife, Dashielle Lashra, 42, live-in companion Dulsa Naedek, 42, and friend David S. Pearl, 46, to hire a man to kill former business associate David Gable and three other men in exchange for an estimated $110,000 worth of stock. Police said the plot was foiled by the intended hit man. Court documents identified him as Amir Tabassi, who sometimes served as Caruthers' bodyguard.
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