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BUSINESS
February 27, 1991
Yesterday's Evening Sun incorrectly reported the position former bankruptcy Judge Harvey M. Lebowitz will fill at the law firm of Whiteford, Taylor & Preston. Lebowitz joins the firm's Bankruptcy and Workout Department and will specialize in bankruptcy. Louis G. Close Jr. will remain managing partner.Sales:James S. Morris is appointed regional sales manager for Cushwa Brick Inc., a manufacturer of machine-molded and handmade brick. He will be responsible for sales and distribution of the company's products in the mid-Atlantic and southeast regional areas.
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NEWS
March 14, 2004
THE FULL dimensions of the public health problem resulting from Maryland General Hospital's appalling use of faulty equipment and procedures to test patients for HIV and hepatitis C are not yet known. But the impact could be severe, not only on individual patients given inaccurate results, but also on the entire campaign to encourage people at risk for these infectious diseases to be tested. Thus, it was dismaying that hospital executives have sought to minimize this tragedy and blame it on low-level workers - one of whom was the whistle-blower who alerted city and state health officials.
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NEWS
March 14, 2004
THE FULL dimensions of the public health problem resulting from Maryland General Hospital's appalling use of faulty equipment and procedures to test patients for HIV and hepatitis C are not yet known. But the impact could be severe, not only on individual patients given inaccurate results, but also on the entire campaign to encourage people at risk for these infectious diseases to be tested. Thus, it was dismaying that hospital executives have sought to minimize this tragedy and blame it on low-level workers - one of whom was the whistle-blower who alerted city and state health officials.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2003
The hill in the center of Aberdeen Proving Ground's Munson Test Area offers a bird's-eye view of an army in transformation: In the distance, an older M1 tank shares the test track with a new Stryker trackless armored vehicle, rattling over washboard-rough stretches and maneuvering through 9 miles of twisting roads. Since the Army announced its plan about three years ago to become lighter, faster and more lethal, APG's scientists, engineers and mathematicians, along with mechanics, technicians and other workers, have been working on designs to revamp the way the military fights and wins wars.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 13, 1990
DANBURY, Conn. -- Errors detected throughout the manufacturing process of the Hubble Space Telescope's flawed main mirror were repeatedly discounted by officials of the company that built it, a scientist assigned to the project said yesterday.Dr. Robin Laurance, a scientist with the European Space Agency attached to the NASA board investigating the telescope's mirror, said yesterday that from the beginning of the manufacturing process, there were indications in test results that something "went radically wrong."
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | October 1, 1991
AAI Corp. has been awarded a $10 million Navy contract to design and develop upgraded electronic testing equipment for the P-3 Orion anti-submarine airplane.The award is the first phase of a contract that could bring up to $50 million in business to the Cockeysville-based company that was one of the fastest-growing defense contractors in the state during the early to mid-1980s but has seen its employment base drop sharply in recent years.Michael Browne, program manager for the P-3 automatic test equipment program, said that the first phase of the contract calls for the production of four units.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 9, 1991
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Two astronauts of the shuttle Atlantis zipped around the spacecraft's bay for the second day in a row yesterday, testing possible equipment and techniques for construction of an orbiting space station later this decade.It looked more like play than work during the six-hour spacewalk. Taking turns, the astronauts glided back and forth on a cart running on a monorail along one side of the shuttle's 60-foot-long cargo bay.They were trying out different manual, mechanical and electrical prototype systems for scooting about safely and efficiently in weightlessness.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff writer | February 5, 1992
Despite the loss of $10.2 million in state money from its current budget, the county school system is being told to supply students with an exhaustive list of materials for the state's functional tests.And school officials are less than pleased with the state's request."We don't have any choice," said Superintendent Larry L. Lorton. "We are mandated to give this test."This Maryland reform movementis being shoved down our throats without any additional funding fromthe state to the local levels," Lorton said."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 29, 1998
MUSKEGON, Mich. -- SPX Corp., the world's top maker of automobile-testing equipment, said yesterday that it will take a fourth-quarter charge of as much as $250 million to cut 1,000 jobs, or 7.1 percent of its work force, and close 25 plants and offices.Over the next six months, SPX will close some of the manufacturing, sales and administrative locations it acquired in its $2.34 billion purchase of electric-motor maker General Signal Corp. in October. The news boosted SPX shares $3.125, to $66.1875, yesterday.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2002
Ahmed Ramadan stands as the link between Middle Eastern businesses and the American products they need to build testing labs and facilities. His Ewest International Inc. exports manufacturing equipment and materials -- to Egypt primarily -- and has been growing by 35 percent annually since it was founded in 1994. This year, he was named Exporter of the Year by the Baltimore office of the Small Business Administration. Ramadan also was among 10 entrepreneurs from throughout the state honored Friday at the Maryland Small Business Awards, and the only Howard County business represented at the ceremony.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2002
Ahmed Ramadan stands as the link between Middle Eastern businesses and the American products they need to build testing labs and facilities. His Ewest International Inc. exports manufacturing equipment and materials -- to Egypt primarily -- and has been growing by 35 percent annually since it was founded in 1994. This year, he was named Exporter of the Year by the Baltimore office of the Small Business Administration. Ramadan also was among 10 entrepreneurs from throughout the state honored Friday at the Maryland Small Business Awards, and the only Howard County business represented at the ceremony.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 29, 1998
MUSKEGON, Mich. -- SPX Corp., the world's top maker of automobile-testing equipment, said yesterday that it will take a fourth-quarter charge of as much as $250 million to cut 1,000 jobs, or 7.1 percent of its work force, and close 25 plants and offices.Over the next six months, SPX will close some of the manufacturing, sales and administrative locations it acquired in its $2.34 billion purchase of electric-motor maker General Signal Corp. in October. The news boosted SPX shares $3.125, to $66.1875, yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1998
Shares of Ciena Corp. slipped yesterday as Wall Street reacted to news that AT&T Corp. has decided to stop its tests of Ciena's equipment.The stock of Linthicum-based Ciena closed at $79.375, down $1.0625. Earlier in the day, shares were as low as $74.75.Ciena, which is being bought by Tellabs Inc., makes gear that turns one communications channel into many, greatly expanding phone network's capacity.AT&T had been testing Ciena equipment that turns one channel into 16, but according to a filing Tellabs made with the Securities and Exchange Commission, AT&T's capacity needs have grown so much that the huge long distance company is shifting to higher-capacity systems.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1997
A subsidiary of Hunt Valley's AAI Corp. has won a pair of defense contracts that the peace-battered company hopes will lead to better times.The Navy awarded $7.6 million to AAI's Engineering and Maintenance Services Inc. subsidiary to move equipment to the Patuxent River Naval Air Station from a testing operation being shut down in New Jersey.And the Air Force selected the subsidiary, known as ESI, as one of three teams to compete for a potentially enormous contract ZTC managing depot operations at McClellan Air Force Base near Sacramento, Calif.
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff writer | February 5, 1992
Despite the loss of $10.2 million in state money from its current budget, the county school system is being told to supply students with an exhaustive list of materials for the state's functional tests.And school officials are less than pleased with the state's request."We don't have any choice," said Superintendent Larry L. Lorton. "We are mandated to give this test."This Maryland reform movementis being shoved down our throats without any additional funding fromthe state to the local levels," Lorton said."
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | October 1, 1991
AAI Corp. has been awarded a $10 million Navy contract to design and develop upgraded electronic testing equipment for the P-3 Orion anti-submarine airplane.The award is the first phase of a contract that could bring up to $50 million in business to the Cockeysville-based company that was one of the fastest-growing defense contractors in the state during the early to mid-1980s but has seen its employment base drop sharply in recent years.Michael Browne, program manager for the P-3 automatic test equipment program, said that the first phase of the contract calls for the production of four units.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1997
A subsidiary of Hunt Valley's AAI Corp. has won a pair of defense contracts that the peace-battered company hopes will lead to better times.The Navy awarded $7.6 million to AAI's Engineering and Maintenance Services Inc. subsidiary to move equipment to the Patuxent River Naval Air Station from a testing operation being shut down in New Jersey.And the Air Force selected the subsidiary, known as ESI, as one of three teams to compete for a potentially enormous contract ZTC managing depot operations at McClellan Air Force Base near Sacramento, Calif.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1998
Shares of Ciena Corp. slipped yesterday as Wall Street reacted to news that AT&T Corp. has decided to stop its tests of Ciena's equipment.The stock of Linthicum-based Ciena closed at $79.375, down $1.0625. Earlier in the day, shares were as low as $74.75.Ciena, which is being bought by Tellabs Inc., makes gear that turns one communications channel into many, greatly expanding phone network's capacity.AT&T had been testing Ciena equipment that turns one channel into 16, but according to a filing Tellabs made with the Securities and Exchange Commission, AT&T's capacity needs have grown so much that the huge long distance company is shifting to higher-capacity systems.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 9, 1991
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Two astronauts of the shuttle Atlantis zipped around the spacecraft's bay for the second day in a row yesterday, testing possible equipment and techniques for construction of an orbiting space station later this decade.It looked more like play than work during the six-hour spacewalk. Taking turns, the astronauts glided back and forth on a cart running on a monorail along one side of the shuttle's 60-foot-long cargo bay.They were trying out different manual, mechanical and electrical prototype systems for scooting about safely and efficiently in weightlessness.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1991
Yesterday's Evening Sun incorrectly reported the position former bankruptcy Judge Harvey M. Lebowitz will fill at the law firm of Whiteford, Taylor & Preston. Lebowitz joins the firm's Bankruptcy and Workout Department and will specialize in bankruptcy. Louis G. Close Jr. will remain managing partner.Sales:James S. Morris is appointed regional sales manager for Cushwa Brick Inc., a manufacturer of machine-molded and handmade brick. He will be responsible for sales and distribution of the company's products in the mid-Atlantic and southeast regional areas.
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