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By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | September 16, 2006
To the highway patrols that monitor Northern Virginia's roads, I have a confession to make. Recently I test-drove a Ferrari 360 Modena in Dulles, Va., for a story about exotic cars and for a brief moment, I was going very fast. Rocketlike, actually. I can't say exactly how fast, because I was too busy watching the horizon come at me rapidly to gaze at the speedometer. And I did it for the simplest reason of all: I was driving a Ferrari. Hamid Adeli, president of the exotic cars company that rents the car, suggested we take it for a spin on the closest thing to a closed track-- a scarcely traveled secondary road.
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NEWS
By Will FespermanThe Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
A few hundred high school juniors gathered in a ring around a hawk as it devoured a squirrel Tuesday morning at the Naval Academy. Brandishing their smartphones, the crowd groaned and cheered at the action. "Take a picture and move on," an academy midshipman shouted. It was the only blood the teens saw during their week at the Naval Academy Summer Seminar for high school students. But there was plenty of talk about warfare, and about other things that fly — such as the U.S. military's V-22 Ospreys, a tiltrotor aircraft that some of the students might one day fly. The academy's Summer Seminar, which offers three weeklong sessions in June, aims to give rising high school seniors a taste of life at the academy before they apply to colleges in the fall.
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BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | March 31, 1992
Beginning tomorrow area motorists can earn credits used to "buy" computers and other education equipment for local schools by cruising about town in a shiny new Corvette or checking out the Chevy Corsica.It's all part of a national General Motors Corp. promotion called "Driving for Education," a takeoff on Giant Food Inc.'s popular "Apples for the Students" program that had students turning in cash register receipts to earn computers for their schools.Instead of collecting cash register receipts, it is hoped that students will push parents and nudge neighbors to go to their Chevrolet dealer and test drive a new car.Participating dealers (there are 10 in the metropolitan area)
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2012
Just in time for the Grand Prix of Baltimore on Labor Day weekend, a local technology company is offering spectators a way to keep their mobile phone batteries charged as they watch the races. NV3 Technologies, a Canton-based maker of rapid-charging kiosks for cellphones, will make available a custom-made trailer that can charge up to 72 mobile devices at one time. It will be located on Ravens Walk, which connects Orioles Park at Camden Yards with M&T Bank Stadium. Soon, NV3 also will launch a pilot program with Arrow Cab, a Baltimore taxi company, where another version of its battery-charging technology will be installed in the backs of 10 cabs.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD and KEVIN COWHERD,SUN REPORTER | December 17, 2005
There is something about a new-car smell that is positively intoxicating. There is something about a new car's shiny interior and gleaming upholstery and glowing Boeing 757-like instrument panel that leaves people giddy and weak. And sometimes when that happens, they get stupid, too. How else to explain that people routinely botch what, it can be argued, the most important part of the new car-buying experience: the test drive. "It's fun to get excited about a new car," said Mitch McCullough, editor-in-chief of newcartestdrive.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1999
David C. Jones Jr. didn't say anything when the car salesman directed him to take the 1993 Lexus to a pair of open-air drug markets in Park Heights.He remained silent when the salesman got out of the car at each location and came back a few minutes later.But when Jones returned to the car dealership on Reisterstown Road after his test drive yesterday afternoon, he revealed his occupation: police officer in Baltimore's Central District drug unit."I couldn't believe that he would take me on a test drive through open air drug markets," said Jones, a 15-year veteran.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | March 31, 1992
Beginning tomorrow area motorists can earn credits used to "buy" computers and other education equipment for local schools by cruising about town in a shiny new Corvette or checking out the Chevy Corsica.It's all part of a national General Motors Corp. promotion called "Driving for Education," a takeoff on Giant Food Inc.'s popular "Apples for the Students" program that had students turning in cash register receipts to earn computers for their schools.Instead of collecting cash register receipts, it is hoped that students will push parents and nudge neighbors to go to their Chevrolet dealer and test drive a new car.Participating dealers (there are 10 in the metropolitan area)
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 15, 2006
NEW YORK -- DaimlerChrysler AG and its Mercedes-Benz USA unit were sued yesterday by a Los Angeles car dealer who wants his money back for a $1.7 million Mercedes AMG Roadster that died after driving only 10 blocks. The silver two-door sports car - the most expensive production car ever built - started malfunctioning during its first customer test drive in 2004, Mark Johnston, the owner of Grand Prix Motors, said in a complaint filed in Los Angeles Superior Court. The lawsuit claims breach of contract and negligence and seeks a full refund for the car. During the test drive, the 12-cylinder vehicle didn't shift properly and its oil light came on, the complaint said.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1999
It takes awhile to get the feel of Jeff Gordon's XS Racing, a newly released video game. Not being a computer games player, I found I hit every wall I saw and every car that tried to pass. At times, I felt as if I was in that Pepsi commercial with Gordon, making my move in reverse. Imagine my surprise, when as the game ended, Jeff's voice said, "Nice job!" Gordon laughed when I told him. "It wasn't meant to be sarcastic," he said. "I think I meant it to be encouraging."
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media | September 18, 1991
Fall is the time to kick the tires of the brand-new models of the Big Three carmakers. It remains to be seen whether investors will similarly examine their stocks. Moving, as always, in a cyclical manner with the economy, these equities haven't equaled the performance of the overall stock market this year.Investors realized that the economic recovery is going to be a slow one. Ford Motor Co.'s stock is up the most and General Motors Corp. is also showing a gain, while Chrysler Corp. is down in price.
SPORTS
By From Sun news services | December 4, 2008
The top-ranked North Carolina men were impressive in what they hope will be the first of three games at Ford Field in Detroit. Tyler Hansbrough scored the first basket of both halves and finished with 25 points and 11 rebounds, leading the Tar Heels to a 98-63 rout of No. 13 Michigan State last night. The Tar Heels (8-0) took control with an 11-3 run late in the first half, led by 14 at halftime, then built a 30-plus-point cushion at the home of the Detroit Lions and the 2009 Final Four.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | October 20, 2008
An Iowa-based research center is looking for 450 Baltimore-area motorists willing to have their every driving move tracked by satellite to test a system that could theoretically replace the federal gasoline tax with road use fees. The federally funded study will use a global positioning system satellite to track not only the mileage driven over eight months, but also whether each road traveled is funded by the state, federal or local governments. Participants will receive a simulated bill each month for the road use fee owed to each level of government.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,Sun reporter | July 4, 2008
June Jordan usually flies when she goes to visit family in South Carolina. But when she saw how high air fares have climbed, she decided - for the first time - to take the train from Baltimore's Penn Station to Columbia. True, her Amtrak train would take 10 hours, getting her in at a sleepy 1:47 this morning. But Jordan, 66, had snacks, water and a Danielle Steel romance to keep her company. With a senior discount, she saved more than $200 by taking the train. "Airfare is too expensive," said Jordan's daughter, Sandy Scheuerman, who bought the $140 train ticket for her mother and was dropping her off at the station.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | September 6, 2007
In my family, we still get a chuckle when someone mentions our first experience with a GPS navigation system, 10 years ago this month. The "system" consisted of a plastic blob containing a GPS receiver that sat on the dashboard, attached by cable to a laptop computer loaded with mapping software. With my wife holding the PC in her lap and my kids and mother in the back seat, we set off on a 10-mile drive to a friend's house -- which normally takes about 15 minutes. In the interest of science, we agreed to follow the system's directions explicitly, wherever they might lead.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun Columnist | May 23, 2007
For various reasons, a lot of workers get stuck in jobs they're not cut out for. And it's not easy getting out of such a bind. Because, well, changing careers requires a leap of faith. How many of us can really quit a job and pursue a passion in, say, fashion or sports without making some sacrifices? That was the dilemma facing Brian Kurth, whose mind began wandering one day in 1999 while stuck in traffic in Chicago. "I was daydreaming about what it would be like to be a winemaker or a dog trainer," recalls Kurth, who wanted more than his corporate job. He parlayed that "what if" question into a business called VocationVacations, where people can essentially test-drive their dream jobs under the guidance of mentors.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | September 16, 2006
To the highway patrols that monitor Northern Virginia's roads, I have a confession to make. Recently I test-drove a Ferrari 360 Modena in Dulles, Va., for a story about exotic cars and for a brief moment, I was going very fast. Rocketlike, actually. I can't say exactly how fast, because I was too busy watching the horizon come at me rapidly to gaze at the speedometer. And I did it for the simplest reason of all: I was driving a Ferrari. Hamid Adeli, president of the exotic cars company that rents the car, suggested we take it for a spin on the closest thing to a closed track-- a scarcely traveled secondary road.
NEWS
By Will FespermanThe Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
A few hundred high school juniors gathered in a ring around a hawk as it devoured a squirrel Tuesday morning at the Naval Academy. Brandishing their smartphones, the crowd groaned and cheered at the action. "Take a picture and move on," an academy midshipman shouted. It was the only blood the teens saw during their week at the Naval Academy Summer Seminar for high school students. But there was plenty of talk about warfare, and about other things that fly — such as the U.S. military's V-22 Ospreys, a tiltrotor aircraft that some of the students might one day fly. The academy's Summer Seminar, which offers three weeklong sessions in June, aims to give rising high school seniors a taste of life at the academy before they apply to colleges in the fall.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 15, 2006
NEW YORK -- DaimlerChrysler AG and its Mercedes-Benz USA unit were sued yesterday by a Los Angeles car dealer who wants his money back for a $1.7 million Mercedes AMG Roadster that died after driving only 10 blocks. The silver two-door sports car - the most expensive production car ever built - started malfunctioning during its first customer test drive in 2004, Mark Johnston, the owner of Grand Prix Motors, said in a complaint filed in Los Angeles Superior Court. The lawsuit claims breach of contract and negligence and seeks a full refund for the car. During the test drive, the 12-cylinder vehicle didn't shift properly and its oil light came on, the complaint said.
NEWS
By LAURA CADIZ and LAURA CADIZ,SUN REPORTER | January 8, 2006
The race for the Howard County executive is officially on. In the first public forum that featured the three candidates, the Columbia Business Exchange invited the men to headline the group's annual State of Columbia luncheon last week. It was a different approach taken by the business networking group for the event, which usually features a speaker extolling the success of the planned suburb. Instead, the candidates got to test-drive their platforms. County Councilman Ken Ulman referred to the success of the extensive community planning process that he helped forge for downtown Columbia; council Chairman Christopher J. Merdon spoke of his bipartisan leadership; and Harry M. Dunbar referred to his life experience.
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