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By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2003
TWO YEARS ago, I was one of about seven education writers who met with President Bush at the White House. He was promoting what became the No Child Left Behind Act, which he signed into law Jan. 8 last year. At one point in the hour-long session, a reporter asked the president to comment on the proposed law's disaggregation of test data. "I can't even pronounce the word," said the leader of the Free World. By now, I suspect he can. Disaggregation is what's causing the act to stagger under its own weight.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
The state's major education players — from school boards to teachers unions and superintendents — signed a pledge Friday to work together to fine-tune a new teacher evaluation system put in place this school year. The action taken at the state school board meeting came moments after a preliminary vote to approve new regulations that would require 20 percent of a teacher's evaluation to be based on annual goals that take test score data into account for the next two years. Teacher evaluations continue to be a delicate issue because some educators have been critical of the use of test scores to evaluate teachers and believe the new system is being pushed through too quickly with a host of other changes.
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NEWS
June 7, 1995
Is EAI using tax funds wisely in city schools?As an educator and a taxpayer in Baltimore City, I am deeply concerned about whether my education tax dollars are spent wisely. I would like to recommend some budget-cutting measures to take effect immediately.First, the contract with Education Alternatives Inc. should be terminated. Privatization of public schools is questionable on its face. Moreover, our tax dollars are leaving the city and going to Minneapolis.EAI seems reluctant to give the city budget or test data or a report on whether the education of Baltimore City students is improving.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
Starting this summer, some Marylanders will have a new way to keep up with the Joneses — on saving energy, and money. The state Public Service Commission recently approved a pilot program by Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. that will give 25,000 of its customers bimonthly reports that show how their energy habits stack up against those of 100 other ratepayers who live in similar dwellings and, in particular, the 20 percent of that group who use...
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | March 28, 1991
State education officials will delay publishing data from new academic tests scheduled to be given in Maryland for the first time this May.The state Board of Education voted yesterday to delay release of the test data until members know how the results will apply to the state's school-improvement program.That means the data will not be part of the state's annual November "report card" on local school performance. Most likely, it will be February, at the earliest, before the new test results will be ready, said Joseph L. Shilling, state school superintendent.
NEWS
By Tim Weiner and Tim Weiner,New York Times News Service | August 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Officials in the "star wars" project rigged a crucial test and faked other data in a program of deception that misled Congress as well as the intended target, the Soviet Union, four former Reagan administration officials said.The deception program was designed to feed the Kremlin half-truths and lies about the project, formally known as the Strategic Defense Initiative, the former administration officials said.It helped persuade the Soviets to spend tens of billions of dollars to counter the U.S. effort to develop a space-based shield against nuclear attack proposed by President Ronald Reagan in 1983, they said.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2010
Starting this summer, some Marylanders will have a new way to keep up with the Joneses — on saving energy, and money. The state Public Service Commission recently approved a pilot program by Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. that will give 25,000 of its customers bimonthly reports that show how their energy habits stack up against those of 100 other ratepayers who live in similar dwellings and, in particular, the 20 percent of that group who use...
NEWS
By Luther Young and Luther Young,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 28, 1990
WASHINGTON -- An independent panel investigating the Hubble Space Telescope mirror flaw concluded yesterday that the manufacturer discounted and withheld critical test data that would have alerted NASA overseers to a problem during the fabrication of the huge mirror.In the final report on its five-month study, the panel also scolded the space agency for accepting the "closed environment" at Perkin-Elmer Corp. of Danbury, Conn., that allowed the flaw to occur and to go undetected until after the $1.5 billion telescope's launch in April.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2002
Though results from the first round of high school assessment tests and the final round of Maryland School Performance Assessment Program tests have been in for nearly three weeks, the Howard County school system has just begun to make sense of them. "This is going to be one of those things that unfolds over the next two to three months," said Leslie Wilson, the school system's director of student assessment and program evaluation. The delay with scores from the first wave of high school tests is largely because Howard school system staff members weren't given computer programs by the State Department of Education to run the test result data or templates for the required parent reports.
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | February 12, 1991
Recently released test scores indicate a tough road ahead for countyschools striving to meet standards for student achievement established by the governor and state Board of Education.Test results of ninth-graders who took the functional math and reading tests in the fall reflect a school system slightly below the state standard level for reading and well below it in math.Only Chesapeake Senior, Crofton Junior, Severn River Junior and Severna Park Senior met the state standard passing rate of 80 percent in the math test.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2010
Maryland education officials laid out a broad vision Tuesday for improving the state's schools and teaching corps, pledging to put the best educators in struggling classrooms while making them more accountable for performance and boosting emphasis on science, math and technoglogy courses. The promises came in a 257-page application that Maryland plans to submit to the U.S. Department of Education this year in a bid for a $250 million slice of $4 billion in federal school reform money known as Race to the Top funding.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | April 25, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Coming to grips with the growing role of genetic testing in American life, Congress acted yesterday to outlaw the use of genetic information in employment or insurance decisions. The Senate approved a measure, which the House of Representatives is expected to ratify and President Bush to sign, that would become the first federal law dealing with the growing role of genetics in the prediction, diagnosis and individualized treatment of disease. Many patients who could benefit have refused genetic testing out of fear of discrimination, experts say, and potentially groundbreaking research into the molecular causes of disease has been stymied because possible study subjects, fearing repercussions, refuse to participate.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun reporter | October 8, 2007
Elementary school teacher Thea Bayly said she has always had a good sense of which kids in her classes could use more help. Now she can identify the kind of assistance they need. With her students last year, Bayly found out, she needed to weave geometry into her math lessons earlier. This term, with her fourth-graders, the Carroll County teacher can better plot out the year and cater to her new charges. And she can do it because of information within easy - and electronic - reach. Public school systems, required to administer high-stakes standardized tests under the federal No Child Left Behind Act and other reforms, are seeking ways to make the reams of test results they collect meaningful for the classroom.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Sun reporter | December 28, 2006
Federal officials probing steroids in sports can use previously confidential drug tests that about 100 major league baseball players failed as part of the investigation, a federal appeals court ruled yesterday. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals' decision - overturning three lower court rulings - could strengthen the perjury case against San Francisco Giants slugger Barry Bonds as well as cause embarrassment for some big leaguers who had seemingly escaped the scandal involving performance-enhancing drugs.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2005
Shares of Advancis Pharmaceutical Corp. sank 17 percent to a new low of $1.45 yesterday on news that its lead product candidate, an oral medicine designed to deliver drugs in time-released bursts, had again failed to achieve its goals in costly, final-stage clinical testing - this time when administered to children. In June, a test in adults showed similar disappointing results, causing a 59 percent stock drop to $2.03. The stock peaked at $10.05 a share in January 2004. "The obvious question is what do we do now and how do we fund our future operations," said Edward M. Rudnic, the Germantown company's chief executive officer, president and chairman, in an early-morning conference call with investors and analysts to discuss Thursday's preliminary results.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2003
MONEY may not buy you love, but those who say it can't buy improved education are wrong. The latest proof comes from Mississippi. Almost four years ago, James L. and Sally Barksdale raised hopes and eyebrows when they committed $100 million to help the poorest children of their native state learn to read. The Barksdales called their act of philanthropy an "investment." If every child learned to read by the third grade, they said, the investment would pay off 20 years down the road. James Barksdale, the former chief of Netscape Communications, had just earned $700 million in the sale of his company to America Online Inc. In establishing the Barksdale Reading Institute, he and his wife applied business principles.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | April 25, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Coming to grips with the growing role of genetic testing in American life, Congress acted yesterday to outlaw the use of genetic information in employment or insurance decisions. The Senate approved a measure, which the House of Representatives is expected to ratify and President Bush to sign, that would become the first federal law dealing with the growing role of genetics in the prediction, diagnosis and individualized treatment of disease. Many patients who could benefit have refused genetic testing out of fear of discrimination, experts say, and potentially groundbreaking research into the molecular causes of disease has been stymied because possible study subjects, fearing repercussions, refuse to participate.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Sun reporter | December 28, 2006
Federal officials probing steroids in sports can use previously confidential drug tests that about 100 major league baseball players failed as part of the investigation, a federal appeals court ruled yesterday. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals' decision - overturning three lower court rulings - could strengthen the perjury case against San Francisco Giants slugger Barry Bonds as well as cause embarrassment for some big leaguers who had seemingly escaped the scandal involving performance-enhancing drugs.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2003
TWO YEARS ago, I was one of about seven education writers who met with President Bush at the White House. He was promoting what became the No Child Left Behind Act, which he signed into law Jan. 8 last year. At one point in the hour-long session, a reporter asked the president to comment on the proposed law's disaggregation of test data. "I can't even pronounce the word," said the leader of the Free World. By now, I suspect he can. Disaggregation is what's causing the act to stagger under its own weight.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | December 24, 2002
Though results from the first round of high school assessment tests and the final round of Maryland School Performance Assessment Program tests have been in for nearly three weeks, the Howard County school system has just begun to make sense of them. "This is going to be one of those things that unfolds over the next two to three months," said Leslie Wilson, the school system's director of student assessment and program evaluation. The delay with scores from the first wave of high school tests is largely because Howard school system staff members weren't given computer programs by the State Department of Education to run the test result data or templates for the required parent reports.
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