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NEWS
August 1, 1996
THE WORLD'S HOPE for a cessation of nuclear weapons test explosions rose when China exploded its 45th device since 1964 and joined France in saying its own tests are over. It was a small underground blast hours before 61 nations resumed the Conference on Disarmament at Geneva.The rush to conclude testing before the conference is one of the few reassuring signs that China's present rulers actually pay heed to world opinion. Like the conservative President Jacques Chirac of France, the Communist President Jiang Zemin of China finally did what his foreign critics kept lecturing him to do.Now that the world's five admitted nuclear powers have each unilaterally stopped testing, the chance of a comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty emerging from this conference is that much improved.
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NEWS
August 11, 2008
Peace groups never shilled for Soviets In "Forgetting evils of communism" (Commentary, Aug. 6), Jonah Goldberg makes a thoroughly unwarranted attack upon the Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy (SANE) and the Nuclear Weapons Freeze Campaign (the Freeze), suggesting they were "intellectual heirs to the 'useful idiots' Lenin relied on," organizations whose activities "were aimed most passionately against America's policies, not the Soviet Union's." Actually, SANE emerged in 1957 as an organization dedicated to securing a nuclear test ban treaty and bringing the nuclear arms race under control.
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NEWS
August 23, 1996
THE LEFTIST new government of India must fear being branded as insufficiently nationalist by the Hindu opposition. So it vetoed the nuclear test ban treaty negotiated by the 61-nation standing Conference on Disarmament at Geneva. This need not keep the other nations from adopting the treaty at the U.N. General Assembly. But it keeps the possibility of an Asian nuclear race alive, and it hobbles the arms control movement.The treaty as written would come into effect when ratified by all 44 nations with nuclear research reactors, including the five declared nuclear powers (the U.S., Russia, China, Britain and France)
NEWS
By Robert J. Einhorn and Wendy R. Sherman | October 25, 2007
While America remains preoccupied with the war in Iraq, our nuclear nightmares are fast becoming more realistic. The potential risks are many, including a Middle East with multiple nuclear states, terrorists acquiring a nuclear weapon from insecure stockpiles, and flaws in our own command and control procedures exposed by unauthorized B-52 flights with nuclear bombs. Current policies are not working. We need drastic change, and we need it soon. A new, comprehensive strategy is needed -- one that takes seriously the mission of preventing a nuclear 9/11, stops states from going nuclear and deters them from conducting a nuclear strike on America or assisting terrorists in acquiring the bomb.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 13, 1999
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton faced the stinging defeat of a prized foreign policy objective last night, as the Senate moved toward an agreement to delay voting on a nuclear test ban treaty indefinitely.Senate Republican Leader Trent Lott tentatively agreed to withdraw the treaty without a vote after Tom Daschle, the Senate Democratic leader, promised not to push for a ratification vote until after Clinton leaves office.The president's Democratic allies in the Senate are short of the two-thirds majority, or 67 votes, needed for passage of the treaty.
NEWS
By EUGENE J. CARROLL JR | September 4, 1992
Washington. -- For 10 years, Americans have been far ahead of their president and the Pentagon on the need for a nuclear test ban.Since 1982, at least 70 percent of those polled have regularly favored a halt to all nuclear tests. Now, Congress is listening and acting, despite strong objections from the White House.xTC It was no great surprise on June 4, when the House voted 237-167 for a one-year moratorium. The shocker was the 68-26 Senate vote on Aug. 3, which for the first time suggests that a probable presidential veto could be answered by a congressional override.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 8, 1996
UNITED NATIONS -- Using a maneuver never tried before to win adoption of a major international arms control treaty, Australia and more than 115 other countries will go to the General Assembly tomorrow to seek approval of a pact banning all nuclear explosions worldwide.If the test-ban treaty is approved by the General Assembly -- where the pact's supporters now have a comfortable two-thirds majority among the 160 or so countries expected to vote -- it will be ready for a formal signing when President Clinton comes to speak to the General Assembly, possibly on Sept.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 21, 1996
MOSCOW -- President Clinton, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin and the leaders of other industrialized nations called yesterday for a speedy enactment of a nuclear test ban and announced measures to stop the smuggling of nuclear bomb ingredients.Their summit meeting also became noteworthy for its warm embrace of the embattled Mr. Yeltsin, who is running for re-election in June, although President Clinton was careful not to declare his preference for Mr. Yeltsin openly.President Jacques Chirac of France, who was co-chairman of the meeting with Mr. Yeltsin, put aside any pretense of impartiality in Russia's hard-fought presidential race.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 25, 1996
BEIJING -- Far beyond the reaches of the Great Wall in a dried-up lake called Lop Nor, China is preparing to detonate a nuclear bomb.When the device goes off sometime in the coming weeks, it will underscore a dilemma facing the emerging world power: Should it continue testing nuclear devices and develop the modern weapons it needs to become a real superpower? Or should it follow the lead of other countries and halt nuclear testing, leaving it far behind other superpowers?China will be under intense pressure to halt the tests.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 30, 1996
BEIJING -- China conducted a nuclear test yesterday, and promised that it would be its last.China is the last acknowledged nuclear weapons power to declare a moratorium on testing. Western diplomats welcomed the announcement, which coincided with the resumption yesterday in Geneva of crucial talks on completing a draft treaty for a worldwide ban on nuclear tests.But the leading Chinese negotiator at the 61-nation disarmament conference, Sha Zukang, surprised other delegations yesterday by saying that China would press for changes in the treaty.
NEWS
By Jenifer Mackby and Ola Dahlman | July 25, 2007
While the United States is spending $3 billion each week on the war in Iraq - a war, let us remember, that was predicated in part on nuclear fears - it refuses to pay a good part of its dues to the organization that provides for monitoring the countries it wants to prevent from developing nuclear weapons, including North Korea and Iran. The organization that is to implement the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty has installed 75 percent of its verification structure, an alarm system that monitors the entire globe for nuclear explosions.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN REPORTER | January 25, 2007
The NFL and its players association agreed on a tougher steroid policy yesterday that will increase the number of random tests for each team, take more money from violators and add the drug erythropoietin (EPO) to the league's list of banned substances. Longtime steroid experts supported many of the moves but said the NFL and other American pro leagues are dragging their feet in adopting the strictest measures possible. "I think there are some positives, but I don't think it goes far enough," said Dr. Gary Wadler, a professor at New York University and member of the committee that determines banned substances for the World Anti-Doping Agency.
NEWS
By Ivo H. Daalder and James M. Lindsay | December 18, 2001
WASHINGTON - President Bush's decision to formally withdraw the United States from the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty shows that American unilateralism is alive and well. In that regard, at least, Sept. 11 changed little in U.S. foreign policy. Some expected and many hoped after the terrorist attacks that Mr. Bush would adopt a more multilateral approach to foreign policy. It was a hope shared even by Mr. Bush's father, who said on Sept. 14: "Just as Pearl Harbor awakened this country from the notion that we could somehow avoid the call to duty and defend freedom in Europe and Asia in World War II, so, too, should this most recent surprise attack erase the concept in some quarters that America can somehow go it alone in the fight against terrorism, or in anything else, for that matter."
NEWS
By Tom Teepen | July 25, 2001
ATLANTA - Hordes of violent anti-thises and anti-thats couldn't break through police lines in Genoa to disrupt the policy musings of the heads of the eight big economies, but one man working from the inside, the president of the United States, pulled off the trick. George W. Bush stuck to his guns, holding that the international effort to cut greenhouse gases and thus mitigate global warming, as undertaken in the Kyoto Treaty, would be bad for some U.S. business and so the United States will have nothing to do with it. Japan and our European allies decided to work toward the Kyoto goals even with the world's biggest source of the problem opting out. There is a pattern developing in this administration.
NEWS
October 22, 1999
Bill Clinton may not be winnng many votes in Congress, but he's picking up political points with his sharp attack on the naysaying nature of the Republican leadership on Capitol Hill. He clearly wants to make this a focal point of the 2000 elections. What prompted the president's ire was last week's rejection by the Republican-controlled Senate of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. He denounced the "reckless partisanship" and "new isolationism" of the GOP. Republicans have repeatedly put themselves on the negative side of issues in recent months, including preserving Medicare, reforming campaign financing, expanding federal aid for teachers and computers in the classroom, making it easier for working women to obtain child care, controlling guns and taxing tobacco products.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | October 19, 1999
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton was at the top of his formidable game in his press conference after the Senate rejected the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty he had signed back in September 1996.He was presidential in argument, literally, invoking the names of Dwight Eisenhower and John F. Kennedy as the fathers of arms control treaties in the 1950s and 1960s.He also echoed the attacks of President Richard Nixon (without using that name) on "new isolationists" in the 1970s.There is irony to that, of course: Nixon was frustrated by liberal Democrats wanting America to come home from Vietnam; President Clinton's target was conservative Republicans who don't want passports or anything else that smacks of internationalism.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 6, 1999
WASHINGTON -- A sweeping nuclear test-ban treaty is facing almost certain rejection by the Senate after supporters and opponents scrambled last night to avert a vote they feared could produce a political and diplomatic embarrassment.Both sides acknowledged that the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, negotiated by President Clinton in 1996, was far short of the two-thirds majority required for ratification.Democrats favor the treaty as necessary to prevent the further development of nuclear weapons.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Jonathan Weisman and Karen Hosler and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- In a crushing setback for the Clinton administration's foreign policy, the Senate overwhelmingly rejected last night a treaty to ban underground nuclear testing, a goal that U.S. presidents have sought since 1958.The vote marked the first defeat of an international security accord since 1919, when the Senate rejected the Treaty of Versailles that created the League of Nations after World War I.The tally, with 48 in favor and 51 against, fell far short of the 67 votes and two-thirds majority required to ratify a treaty.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 15, 1999
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton took the offensive yesterday against what he called the "reckless partisans" who defeated the nuclear test ban treaty, warning that their action could set off a round of dangerous testing and a proliferation of atomic weapons.A day after his most devastating foreign policy setback, Clinton excoriated the Senate Republicans' "new isolationism," which he said "threatens America's economic well-being and now our national security.""They are betting our children's future on the reckless proposition that we can go it alone, that at the height of our prosperity, we should bury our heads in the sand," Clinton said during an hourlong televised news conference that was dominated by the test ban debate.
NEWS
October 15, 1999
THE SENATE'S defeat Wednesday evening of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty dealt a reckless blow to four decades of bipartisan efforts to ensure U.S. national security.The United States has complied with the terms of this treaty since the end of the Bush administration and will go on doing so. The treaty is an effort to halt nuclear weapons development by the 43 other countries capable of it.Instead, the Senate message was, go ahead.The main valid criticism of the treaty is that it seeks to lock in the overwhelming U.S. advantage over other countries.
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