Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTerry Nichols
IN THE NEWS

Terry Nichols

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Dan Berger | September 10, 2001
Terry Nichols can save Oklahoma the trauma of trying him for 160 murders. He can plead guilty. How about Bill Swisher, Kurt Schmoke and Stuart Simms all run for their old job? Too bad power plants in the Ohio River coal country can't send us clean electricity without the dirty air byproduct. Demonstrators against the IMF will shut down George Washington University. What a blow to the IMF.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Dan Berger | September 10, 2001
Terry Nichols can save Oklahoma the trauma of trying him for 160 murders. He can plead guilty. How about Bill Swisher, Kurt Schmoke and Stuart Simms all run for their old job? Too bad power plants in the Ohio River coal country can't send us clean electricity without the dirty air byproduct. Demonstrators against the IMF will shut down George Washington University. What a blow to the IMF.
Advertisement
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 24, 1997
DENVER -- After a long and painful vigil, the families of the victims that gathered last night said they found little solace in the verdict in the Terry L. Nichols trial."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 22, 1998
Terry L. Nichols has asked the federal appeals court in Denver for a new trial in the Oklahoma City bombing, contending that the federal judge who presided over his case erred at his trial and his sentencing.In December, a federal court jury in Denver convicted Nichols, 43, a military-surplus dealer, of conspiring with his former Army buddy Timothy J. McVeigh to bomb the Oklahoma City federal building, where 168 people died April 19, 1995.Nichols was also convicted on eight counts of involuntary manslaughter in the deaths of the eight federal law-enforcement agents killed in the bombing.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 11, 1998
DENVER -- In vote after vote, a majority of jurors raised their hands to sentence Terry Nichols to death, but they were blocked by a few determined holdouts, said two jurors in the second Oklahoma bombing trial."
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 22, 1995
DECKER, Mich. -- Even before yesterday's raid on the family farmhouse in Decker, the Nichols brothers were known for their radical beliefs about politics and farming."
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | May 15, 1995
Josh is 12 years old. You may not know him. But that doesn't mean you haven't seen him.His dad, Terry Nichols, has been charged in connection with the Oklahoma City bombing. Josh, whose parents are divorced, spent time with his father in the days before the blast.The FBI wanted to talk to him about what he might have seen. Josh is not a suspect, of course. He's a frightened, confused kid.He's a frightened, confused kid who was seen running through an airport the other day. In case you missed him, he was the 12-year-old trying to cover his face with a gym bag while "news" people carrying minicams and microphones gave chase.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 22, 1998
Terry L. Nichols has asked the federal appeals court in Denver for a new trial in the Oklahoma City bombing, contending that the federal judge who presided over his case erred at his trial and his sentencing.In December, a federal court jury in Denver convicted Nichols, 43, a military-surplus dealer, of conspiring with his former Army buddy Timothy J. McVeigh to bomb the Oklahoma City federal building, where 168 people died April 19, 1995.Nichols was also convicted on eight counts of involuntary manslaughter in the deaths of the eight federal law-enforcement agents killed in the bombing.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 7, 1997
When Terry L. Nichols comes to trial in Denver on Sept. 29, on charges that he helped plot the Oklahoma City bombing, his lawyers are expected to spend a lot of time trying to focus the jury's attention on one point: Terry Nichols is not Timothy J. McVeigh.They have already said so in court. At a hearing last week, Nichols' attorneys tried to block the introduction of some trial evidence -- including evidence of Nichols' anti-government philosophies. The defense objected that government prosecutors were trying "to turn Mr. Nichols into Mr. McVeigh in the eyes of the jury."
NEWS
By Dan Berger | January 9, 1998
The Middle River Speedway proposal ran smack into theTowson Wall.Four thousand mathematicians convened in Baltimore to play Lotto.Psst. Buddy. Get out of Confederate dollars and into Indonesian rupiah, which will rise again.They may both think that Terry Nichols faces a worse punishment than Timothy McVeigh.Pub Date: 1/09/98
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 11, 1998
DENVER -- In vote after vote, a majority of jurors raised their hands to sentence Terry Nichols to death, but they were blocked by a few determined holdouts, said two jurors in the second Oklahoma bombing trial."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 24, 1997
DENVER -- After a long and painful vigil, the families of the victims that gathered last night said they found little solace in the verdict in the Terry L. Nichols trial."
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 7, 1997
When Terry L. Nichols comes to trial in Denver on Sept. 29, on charges that he helped plot the Oklahoma City bombing, his lawyers are expected to spend a lot of time trying to focus the jury's attention on one point: Terry Nichols is not Timothy J. McVeigh.They have already said so in court. At a hearing last week, Nichols' attorneys tried to block the introduction of some trial evidence -- including evidence of Nichols' anti-government philosophies. The defense objected that government prosecutors were trying "to turn Mr. Nichols into Mr. McVeigh in the eyes of the jury."
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | May 15, 1995
Josh is 12 years old. You may not know him. But that doesn't mean you haven't seen him.His dad, Terry Nichols, has been charged in connection with the Oklahoma City bombing. Josh, whose parents are divorced, spent time with his father in the days before the blast.The FBI wanted to talk to him about what he might have seen. Josh is not a suspect, of course. He's a frightened, confused kid.He's a frightened, confused kid who was seen running through an airport the other day. In case you missed him, he was the 12-year-old trying to cover his face with a gym bag while "news" people carrying minicams and microphones gave chase.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 22, 1995
DECKER, Mich. -- Even before yesterday's raid on the family farmhouse in Decker, the Nichols brothers were known for their radical beliefs about politics and farming."
NEWS
June 11, 2012
I was not downtown during the recent disturbances, but I will take Del. Pat McDonough's word that the groups of young thugs were, in fact, black ("Baltimore and bigotry," May 18). Here is the point I want to make: The fact that they were black had nothing to do with their despicable behavior. In recent coverage of the meth lab bust, did anyone refer to the accused as a group of white drug peddlers? How about Oklahoma City bombers Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols, or serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer, did their "whiteness" have something to do with their behavior?
FEATURES
By Assoicated Press | April 19, 1996
Today in history: April 19In 1775, the American Revolutionary War began with the battles of Lexington and Concord.In 1910, after weeks of being viewed through telescopes, Halley's Comet was reported visible to the naked eye in Curacao.In 1933, the United States went off the gold standard.In 1943, during World War II, tens of thousands of Jews living in the Warsaw Ghetto began waging a valiant but futile battle against Nazi forces.In 1951, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, relieved of his command by President Truman, bade farewell to Congress, quoting a ballad: "Old soldiers never die; they just fade away."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.