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By Dave Rosenthal | January 24, 2013
Save the date: The Enoch Pratt Library's 25th annual Booklovers' Breakfast , featuring acclaimed author Terry McMillan , is coming up on Saturday, Feb. 9. She was the speaker at the first event, and is coming back for the big anniversary. The event runs from 8:30 a.m. to noon at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel. Tickets are $50 per person or $450 for a table of 10. McMillan's tales, which include " Waiting to Exhale, " "How Stella Got Her Groove Back" and "Getting to Happy," have been enjoyed by million in book form and screen adaptations.
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By Dave Rosenthal | January 24, 2013
Save the date: The Enoch Pratt Library's 25th annual Booklovers' Breakfast , featuring acclaimed author Terry McMillan , is coming up on Saturday, Feb. 9. She was the speaker at the first event, and is coming back for the big anniversary. The event runs from 8:30 a.m. to noon at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel. Tickets are $50 per person or $450 for a table of 10. McMillan's tales, which include " Waiting to Exhale, " "How Stella Got Her Groove Back" and "Getting to Happy," have been enjoyed by million in book form and screen adaptations.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jean Thompson and By Jean Thompson,Sun Staff | January 7, 2001
"A Day Late and a Dollar Short," by Terry McMillan. Viking. 432 pages. 25.95. Dear Ms. McMillan: Girlfriend, you must be running out of material. You done wore out the mama thang and the sister thang already. So now you up in everybody's family business: outside children, aunties hooked on prescription pills, stepfathers with dirty minds. But what's up with all this forgiveness stuff? Chile, you in love -- or therapy? I predict that "A Day Late and a Dollar Short" will be a best seller and a made-for-TV movie.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2005
Terry McMillan doesn't want to talk about her pending divorce anymore. It's just that everyone else, from Tavis Smiley on PBS to Katie Couric on the Today show, wants to talk about her acrimonious split from Jonathan Plummer, the yummy younger Jamaican man who inspired How Stella Got Her Groove Back - both the book and the sizzling film - and now turns out to be gay. McMillan is vowing not to take further bait from reporters or readers and to stay on...
NEWS
By Sherryl Connelly and Sherryl Connelly,New York Daily News | May 24, 1992
WAITING TO EXHALE. Terry McMillan. Viking.409 pages. $22. Savannah is close onto 40, caring, smart and, incidentally, quite attractive.Robin, who relies on astrology and numerology to guide her through life, is totally accommodating when she meets a man these days.For a good time, don't call Gloria, who is too busy rearing her teen-age son and running her beauty salon to find the antidote to her celibacy.Don't call Beverly, either. Her husband hasn't run off with that young white girl yet. But he will.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Staff Writer | July 5, 1992
Washington -- She opens the door to her room at the posh Jefferson Hotel and two things are instantly clear: One, this is a woman with an attitude, and, two, novelist Terry McMillan takes no prisoners."
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and By Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2001
In a Washington hotel room, Terry McMillan, cozy in a Philadelphia Flyers jersey and flared black stretch pants, keeps her distance from the compassionate conservatives mustering below for the presidential inauguration. In the lobby, they flash their cell phones and greet one another with manly bear hugs while a pianist ripples through "God Bless America" and other patriotic anthems. McMillan rolls her eyes. "Puh-leeze," she will protest later to her Smithsonian audience, when asked if she'll be attending the inaugural festivities.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1996
Paula Tolson showed up almost as soon as copies of Terry McMillan's new novel arrived yesterday at Waldenbooks in Security Square Mall. She was followed by Kaye Campbell. And then by Princeanna Quarles.All three women refused to wait a day longer than necessary to learn "How Stella Got Her Groove Back." And their eagerness is shared by thousands of mostly middle-class African American women who will gladly lay out $23.95 to find out who Stella is and what this groove thing is all about.That's the power of Terry McMillan, 44, whose last novel, "Waiting to Exhale," sold 4 million copies, inspired a hit movie by the same name and singlehandedly forced publishers to start paying attention to black women readers.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2005
Terry McMillan doesn't want to talk about her pending divorce anymore. It's just that everyone else, from Tavis Smiley on PBS to Katie Couric on the Today show, wants to talk about her acrimonious split from Jonathan Plummer, the yummy younger Jamaican man who inspired How Stella Got Her Groove Back - both the book and the sizzling film - and now turns out to be gay. McMillan is vowing not to take further bait from reporters or readers and to stay on...
NEWS
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 24, 1995
They do make an odd couple.He's as mild-looking as they come, a smooth, unflappable man in the comfy, anti-style wardrobe of a National Public Radio talk-show host, complete to the beard and horn-rim glasses, the cardigan sweater, the open collar and the well-broken-in shoes.She's who she is, dammit, and she doesn't care who knows about it or what they think. In cowboy boots, black leather jeans, a black velvet blazer and a white lace turtleneck, she's a woman no man would mess with. Her hair is gathered in a garland of tendrils, but her face isn't soft or sweet at all; it's tough, proud, beautiful and not the sort of a face to take anything off anybody.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and By Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2001
In a Washington hotel room, Terry McMillan, cozy in a Philadelphia Flyers jersey and flared black stretch pants, keeps her distance from the compassionate conservatives mustering below for the presidential inauguration. In the lobby, they flash their cell phones and greet one another with manly bear hugs while a pianist ripples through "God Bless America" and other patriotic anthems. McMillan rolls her eyes. "Puh-leeze," she will protest later to her Smithsonian audience, when asked if she'll be attending the inaugural festivities.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jean Thompson and By Jean Thompson,Sun Staff | January 7, 2001
"A Day Late and a Dollar Short," by Terry McMillan. Viking. 432 pages. 25.95. Dear Ms. McMillan: Girlfriend, you must be running out of material. You done wore out the mama thang and the sister thang already. So now you up in everybody's family business: outside children, aunties hooked on prescription pills, stepfathers with dirty minds. But what's up with all this forgiveness stuff? Chile, you in love -- or therapy? I predict that "A Day Late and a Dollar Short" will be a best seller and a made-for-TV movie.
NEWS
By Jocelyn McClurg and Jocelyn McClurg,Hartford Courant | May 12, 1996
"How Stella Got Her Groove Back," by Terry McMillan. Viking. 368 pages. $23.95What saves this book from sheer sappiness is the tell-it-like-it-is voice that the author honed to smart-mouthed perfection in 1992's "Waiting To Exhale" and that she resurrects here in the person of Stella Payne.As a narrator, Stella gives James Joyce a run for his stream-of-consciousness money. In profanity-drenched run-on-and-on sentences, Stella offers her two cents on everything from the hollowness of corporate America to violence in the 'hood to the fine art of douching.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | April 30, 1996
Paula Tolson showed up almost as soon as copies of Terry McMillan's new novel arrived yesterday at Waldenbooks in Security Square Mall. She was followed by Kaye Campbell. And then by Princeanna Quarles.All three women refused to wait a day longer than necessary to learn "How Stella Got Her Groove Back." And their eagerness is shared by thousands of mostly middle-class African American women who will gladly lay out $23.95 to find out who Stella is and what this groove thing is all about.That's the power of Terry McMillan, 44, whose last novel, "Waiting to Exhale," sold 4 million copies, inspired a hit movie by the same name and singlehandedly forced publishers to start paying attention to black women readers.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1996
Connie Briscoe assumed her writing life would follow this script: Her first novel would sell a few copies. Enough to do modestly well. She'd keep her day job as managing editor of American Annals of the Deaf while banging out novels two and three. And then, maybe, just maybe, she would break out from the pack of authors and her third or fourth novel would really take off.This is what really happened: Connie Briscoe's first novel "Sisters & Lovers," was published by HarperCollins in 1994 in the wake of the phenomenal success of Terry McMillan's "Waiting to Exhale."
NEWS
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 24, 1995
They do make an odd couple.He's as mild-looking as they come, a smooth, unflappable man in the comfy, anti-style wardrobe of a National Public Radio talk-show host, complete to the beard and horn-rim glasses, the cardigan sweater, the open collar and the well-broken-in shoes.She's who she is, dammit, and she doesn't care who knows about it or what they think. In cowboy boots, black leather jeans, a black velvet blazer and a white lace turtleneck, she's a woman no man would mess with. Her hair is gathered in a garland of tendrils, but her face isn't soft or sweet at all; it's tough, proud, beautiful and not the sort of a face to take anything off anybody.
NEWS
By Jocelyn McClurg and Jocelyn McClurg,Hartford Courant | May 12, 1996
"How Stella Got Her Groove Back," by Terry McMillan. Viking. 368 pages. $23.95What saves this book from sheer sappiness is the tell-it-like-it-is voice that the author honed to smart-mouthed perfection in 1992's "Waiting To Exhale" and that she resurrects here in the person of Stella Payne.As a narrator, Stella gives James Joyce a run for his stream-of-consciousness money. In profanity-drenched run-on-and-on sentences, Stella offers her two cents on everything from the hollowness of corporate America to violence in the 'hood to the fine art of douching.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1996
Connie Briscoe assumed her writing life would follow this script: Her first novel would sell a few copies. Enough to do modestly well. She'd keep her day job as managing editor of American Annals of the Deaf while banging out novels two and three. And then, maybe, just maybe, she would break out from the pack of authors and her third or fourth novel would really take off.This is what really happened: Connie Briscoe's first novel "Sisters & Lovers," was published by HarperCollins in 1994 in the wake of the phenomenal success of Terry McMillan's "Waiting to Exhale."
NEWS
By Wiley A. Hall 3rd | July 14, 1992
Will B. Humble walked into the bar, looking mighty unhappy."How was your weekend, good buddy?" I asked."Terrible!" exclaimed Humble. "My girlfriend spent the whole weekend reading that new Terry McMillan novel, 'Waiting to Exhale.'""Uh, oh.""Every few pages she'd shout something like, 'That's right!,' or 'You tell 'em, honey!' and then turn and shake her fist at me.""Uh, oh.""Yesterday, she left the distinct impression that I may never see her again," moaned Humble."What'd she say?""Well, I asked her about going to a movie today and she said, 'Don't hold your breath.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Staff Writer | July 5, 1992
Washington -- She opens the door to her room at the posh Jefferson Hotel and two things are instantly clear: One, this is a woman with an attitude, and, two, novelist Terry McMillan takes no prisoners."
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