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By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff Writer | May 1, 1995
The year is 2035, and Terry Gilliam is right at home. In a vast, underground chamber where humankind is gasping out its last days, the film director is perched on a chair that sits not on the floor, but halfway up the wall.The year is 1995, and on the set of the time-travel drama "Twelve Monkeys," built in an abandoned power plant in South Baltimore, the future is humming in an imaginative juxtaposition of gee-whiz gizmos and industrial nightmare. This is Mr. Gilliam's future, not unlike the world he created in "Brazil," where bits of typewriters, computers, glass and mysteriously moving gears are fused into machines of unsettling allure, surrounded by pipes and tubing that lead to mysterious destinations.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 28, 2003
The past few years have given us a handful of wonderful "making-of" documentaries, including Paul Seydor's The Wild Bunch: An Album in Montage and Richard Rush's The Sinister Saga of Making The Stunt Man. And now for something completely different (as Monty Python used to say), there's a vivid "un-making of" documentary, Lost in La Mancha, starring Terry Gilliam - the American-born Monty Python member beloved for his collage-like animations and his own out-there movies like Brazil. This engaging and enraging movie chronicles Gilliam's doomed attempt to film a Cervantes-inspired script called The Man Who Killed Don Quixote.
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By Chris Kaltenbach | October 3, 1999
Life after 'Python'The members of Monty Python released their last film, "Monty Python's Meaning of Life," in 1983. Here's a brief look at their careers outside the group:* Graham Chapman: After overcoming alcoholism and a lifelong case of stage fright, Chapman went on well-received lecture tours of college campuses through most of the 1980s. He also produced, co-wrote and starred in the film "Yellowbeard." Chapman died of cancer Oct. 4, 1989, one day short of "Python's" 20th anniversary.
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By MARYLAND FILM FESTIVAL | May 2, 2002
Adrift (dir. Tom Curran, USA) Revisiting his family's past in Alaska and Cape Cod, Tom Curran provides a first-person account of loss in an Irish-American family. Adventures of Baron Munchausen (dir. Terry Gilliam, UK) Terry Gilliam's masterpiece will be presented by guest host Colleen Haskell, a Bethesda native and contestant from the first season of Survivor. Americanos (dir. Paul Callahan, USA) A man in his 30s who lives with his mother and spends most of his time at the local bar gets wrapped up in a Cuban cigar smuggling scheme with his wealthy lawyer friend.
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By MARYLAND FILM FESTIVAL | May 2, 2002
Adrift (dir. Tom Curran, USA) Revisiting his family's past in Alaska and Cape Cod, Tom Curran provides a first-person account of loss in an Irish-American family. Adventures of Baron Munchausen (dir. Terry Gilliam, UK) Terry Gilliam's masterpiece will be presented by guest host Colleen Haskell, a Bethesda native and contestant from the first season of Survivor. Americanos (dir. Paul Callahan, USA) A man in his 30s who lives with his mother and spends most of his time at the local bar gets wrapped up in a Cuban cigar smuggling scheme with his wealthy lawyer friend.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 28, 2003
The past few years have given us a handful of wonderful "making-of" documentaries, including Paul Seydor's The Wild Bunch: An Album in Montage and Richard Rush's The Sinister Saga of Making The Stunt Man. And now for something completely different (as Monty Python used to say), there's a vivid "un-making of" documentary, Lost in La Mancha, starring Terry Gilliam - the American-born Monty Python member beloved for his collage-like animations and his own out-there movies like Brazil. This engaging and enraging movie chronicles Gilliam's doomed attempt to film a Cervantes-inspired script called The Man Who Killed Don Quixote.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2001
Nearly all film screenings are at the Charles Theatre, 1711 N. Charles St. Other venues for films and special events are the Charles Palace, 225 N. Charles St.; the Senator Theatre, 5904 York Road; Heritage Cinema House, 19-21 E. North Ave.; the Bengies Drive-In, 3417 Eastern Blvd.; Evergreen House, 4545 N. Charles St.; and the National Aquarium, 501 E. Pratt St. FILM GUIDE THE AMERICAN ASTRONAUT (dir. Cory McAbee) This offbeat, black-and-white, musical, space-western comedy was a hit at Sundance.
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By Stephen Wigler | September 8, 1991
Fall means that kids go back to school. It also means that films for adults are in the offing -- from Martin Scorsese's disturbing sexual thriller "Cape Fear" to John Sayles' drama of smoldering ethnic tensions, "City of Hope."The exception that proves the rule is that the first movie of the fall is really the last movie of the summer: "Freddy's Dead: The Final Nightmare," which opens here Friday the 13th and will be the sixth -- and supposedly final -- installment of the "Nightmare on Elm Street" series featuring dream slasher Freddy Krueger.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1998
Don't kids yourself. Size always matters in Hollywood, especially in summer. Much Tinseltown is holding its breath, waiting to se if the big guy has legs -- and whether his ravenous appetite will leave room for anyone else.The big guy, in case you've been living in a cave the past few months, is Godzilla, the humongous, firebreathing, Tokyo-destroying lizard that Tristar is reviving. With its ubiquitous "size Does Matter" ad campaign, plus some clever trailers, "Godzilla" is pretty much guaranteed a monster opening weekend; the queston is, where does it go from there?
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 26, 2001
Monty Python and the Holy Grail is a shot in the funny bone - or, rather, an entire fusillade of shots, some landing on bones you never realized could be funny. French knights send Arthur King of the Britons into retreat with taunts, such as "I blow my nose at you, so-called `Arthur King.' " Catapulted cow and Trojan Rabbit alike curl across the screen like arrows crossed with boomerangs. Arthur can't make his way to Camelot without rousing discussions of class warfare, and once he gets there, he has a nightmare musical-comedy vision of a chorus line singing "We're knights of the Round Table, our shows are for-mi-dable."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2001
Nearly all film screenings are at the Charles Theatre, 1711 N. Charles St. Other venues for films and special events are the Charles Palace, 225 N. Charles St.; the Senator Theatre, 5904 York Road; Heritage Cinema House, 19-21 E. North Ave.; the Bengies Drive-In, 3417 Eastern Blvd.; Evergreen House, 4545 N. Charles St.; and the National Aquarium, 501 E. Pratt St. FILM GUIDE THE AMERICAN ASTRONAUT (dir. Cory McAbee) This offbeat, black-and-white, musical, space-western comedy was a hit at Sundance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | October 3, 1999
Life after 'Python'The members of Monty Python released their last film, "Monty Python's Meaning of Life," in 1983. Here's a brief look at their careers outside the group:* Graham Chapman: After overcoming alcoholism and a lifelong case of stage fright, Chapman went on well-received lecture tours of college campuses through most of the 1980s. He also produced, co-wrote and starred in the film "Yellowbeard." Chapman died of cancer Oct. 4, 1989, one day short of "Python's" 20th anniversary.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1998
Don't kids yourself. Size always matters in Hollywood, especially in summer. Much Tinseltown is holding its breath, waiting to se if the big guy has legs -- and whether his ravenous appetite will leave room for anyone else.The big guy, in case you've been living in a cave the past few months, is Godzilla, the humongous, firebreathing, Tokyo-destroying lizard that Tristar is reviving. With its ubiquitous "size Does Matter" ad campaign, plus some clever trailers, "Godzilla" is pretty much guaranteed a monster opening weekend; the queston is, where does it go from there?
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff Writer | May 1, 1995
The year is 2035, and Terry Gilliam is right at home. In a vast, underground chamber where humankind is gasping out its last days, the film director is perched on a chair that sits not on the floor, but halfway up the wall.The year is 1995, and on the set of the time-travel drama "Twelve Monkeys," built in an abandoned power plant in South Baltimore, the future is humming in an imaginative juxtaposition of gee-whiz gizmos and industrial nightmare. This is Mr. Gilliam's future, not unlike the world he created in "Brazil," where bits of typewriters, computers, glass and mysteriously moving gears are fused into machines of unsettling allure, surrounded by pipes and tubing that lead to mysterious destinations.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | September 8, 1991
Fall means that kids go back to school. It also means that films for adults are in the offing -- from Martin Scorsese's disturbing sexual thriller "Cape Fear" to John Sayles' drama of smoldering ethnic tensions, "City of Hope."The exception that proves the rule is that the first movie of the fall is really the last movie of the summer: "Freddy's Dead: The Final Nightmare," which opens here Friday the 13th and will be the sixth -- and supposedly final -- installment of the "Nightmare on Elm Street" series featuring dream slasher Freddy Krueger.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | May 5, 2001
Saturday highlights "Brazil," 1 p.m. at the Charles. Terry Gilliam's cockeyed masterpiece, about a future more perverse than anything George Orwell ever imagined, went largely unseen when it was released in 1985. Do your part in righting that wrong. "Rediscovering George Washington," 1 p.m. at the Charles. Here's a tough decision: "Brazil" or this documentary on America's first president, from Montgomery County resident Michael Pack, whose "The Fall of Newt Gingrich" was a highlight of MFF 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2002
The Maryland Film Festival takes place May 2-5 at the Charles Theatre, 1711 N. Charles St., the Heritage Cinema House, 19-21 E. North Ave., and the Senator Theatre, 5904 York Road. Regular admission is $8 and $10. A three-day pass is $20. An opening-night ticket is $50. An all-access pass is $250. Call 410-752-8083 or visit www.mdfilmfest.com on the Web. More information on the festival, as well as schedule updates, can be obtained through The Sun's Web site, www.SunSpot.net. The site also links to several online chats with festival participants.
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