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By Julie Rothman,
For The Baltimore Sun
| July 23, 2013
Brenda Stup from Ellicott City was looking for the recipe for a blue cheese pate or terrine that was served many years ago at the Kings Contrivance Restaurant in Columbia. It was served as an appetizer on a bed of greens. She said it was absolutely delicious and she used to order it every time she ate there, but it is no longer on the menu. I attempted to contact the restaurant to see if it would be willing to share their recipe but never received a response. I did, however, locate a similar-sounding recipe on whatscookingamerica.net that I thought might be close to what Stup wanted.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman,
For The Baltimore Sun
| July 23, 2013
Brenda Stup from Ellicott City was looking for the recipe for a blue cheese pate or terrine that was served many years ago at the Kings Contrivance Restaurant in Columbia. It was served as an appetizer on a bed of greens. She said it was absolutely delicious and she used to order it every time she ate there, but it is no longer on the menu. I attempted to contact the restaurant to see if it would be willing to share their recipe but never received a response. I did, however, locate a similar-sounding recipe on whatscookingamerica.net that I thought might be close to what Stup wanted.
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FEATURES
By Marie Bianco and Marie Bianco,Newsday | September 19, 1993
Americans have never been a nation of vegetable lovers. French fries, maybe, and some ketchup. Add a few leaves of iceberg lettuce and some corn on the cob during August, and you have the total vegetable consumption of many.One of the reasons we don't eat more vegetables is because they can be dull, especially now that butter and cheese sauce are verboten.Enter roasted vegetables. And one of their possible conclusions, the roasted vegetable terrine. As we knew them, vegetable terrines consisted of layers of pureed vegetables cooked so long that they lose all their taste.
ENTERTAINMENT
By HARTFORD COURANT | February 8, 2004
Flying is fraught with so many uncertainties these days: Will my flight be canceled by a terror threat? Did I forget to take the nail file out of my purse? Did that other passenger just walk off with my shoes? At least now you can be certain of one thing: what the food might look like on your next flight (assuming you're lucky enough to get any). A Web site, airlinemeals .net, posts photographs taken by passengers in flight, along with their ratings and comments. More than 300 airlines are represented, from Aeroflot to Yangon Airways.
FEATURES
By Michelle Huneven and Michelle Huneven,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | October 3, 2001
One night in Paris, two friends of mine took me to a tiny, modest cafe in the Sixth Arrondissement. It was one of countless dimly lighted establishments with battered chairs, tiny tables and a chalkboard menu. Wine and water arrived in unmarked glass decanters, and the waiter got up from his own aperitif to grudgingly take our orders. We'd had a large midday meal with family, so we ordered only salads, which were nothing exceptional, except that in France the lettuce actually has flavor.
NEWS
By Larry Bingham and Larry Bingham,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2002
The thing I like most about Rozanne Gold's new cookbook, Desserts 1-2-3: Deliciously Simple Three-Ingredient Desserts, is not her knack for tapping into our harried lifestyles and paring down the grocery list. Nor is the thing I like most her skill -- and she is brilliant here -- at giving her seemingly simple concoctions highfalutin names that mask their humble origins: Melon Tartare With Raspberry Coulis; Pineapple Carpaccio With Roasted Grapes, Cinnamon Jus; Rhubarb Compote With Candied Ginger, Maple Snow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By HARTFORD COURANT | February 8, 2004
Flying is fraught with so many uncertainties these days: Will my flight be canceled by a terror threat? Did I forget to take the nail file out of my purse? Did that other passenger just walk off with my shoes? At least now you can be certain of one thing: what the food might look like on your next flight (assuming you're lucky enough to get any). A Web site, airlinemeals .net, posts photographs taken by passengers in flight, along with their ratings and comments. More than 300 airlines are represented, from Aeroflot to Yangon Airways.
FEATURES
By Janice Baker | June 2, 1991
Some restaurants beam out self-amused messages, some look old, wise, inured to any eventuality, some feel tentative, others are evangelical about some point of view. According to my reading of Hampton's, at around 5 o'clock, before the early diners ascend those lovely, carpeted stairs, the restaurant straightens its rose-curtained shoulders and whispers reassuring adjectives to itself: I'm expensive, I'm young, I'm glossy and I'm ambitious. It won't smile gently and add "seasoned" for several years yet.In the meantime, it offers youthful energy and drive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynn Williams and Lynn Williams,Sun Restaurant Critic | July 5, 1991
Feeling frazzled? In this weather, it's hard not to. If you can't escape to other latitudes, try an escape to the 18th century. In candlelit rooms of brick and beam, fussed over by an attentive, gracious staff, you can forget you ever heard the word "stress."Pampering? The Treaty of Paris, in Annapolis' historic Maryland Inn, might have invented the concept. (The treaty in question ended America's revolution against monarchy, but the restaurant that honors it certainly treats its customers as royalty.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 4, 2002
Cafe de Paris, a French bistro formerly in Laurel, has found a new home in Columbia, where owner Erik Rochard wants to do more than offer excellent food. He wants to change the public's perception of French cuisine. "I think that the French restaurants in all the big cities in the United Sates are a bit over-priced, high-end and fancy," he said. "I wanted to show that a bistro concept - a place where you can come in casually and find good food at a reasonable price in a nice atmosphere - has a place in an average-sized city.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2003
At the turn of the Jewish New Year, who can resist signs of renewal, or even miracles? With the New Year beginning Friday night, imagine the sense of wonder in turning to page 26 of a new cookbook, Kosher by Design, to find a vision in green, orange and white, a triple-layer wedge of delight and delicacy that could proudly be served by the finest cake baker. But wait a minute, it's not a slice of cake. It's ... Gefilte fish? The page heading, Tricolor Gefilte Fish, appears above this picture of loveliness, a disconnect of word and image that perhaps demands translation here.
NEWS
By Larry Bingham and Larry Bingham,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2002
The thing I like most about Rozanne Gold's new cookbook, Desserts 1-2-3: Deliciously Simple Three-Ingredient Desserts, is not her knack for tapping into our harried lifestyles and paring down the grocery list. Nor is the thing I like most her skill -- and she is brilliant here -- at giving her seemingly simple concoctions highfalutin names that mask their humble origins: Melon Tartare With Raspberry Coulis; Pineapple Carpaccio With Roasted Grapes, Cinnamon Jus; Rhubarb Compote With Candied Ginger, Maple Snow.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 4, 2002
Cafe de Paris, a French bistro formerly in Laurel, has found a new home in Columbia, where owner Erik Rochard wants to do more than offer excellent food. He wants to change the public's perception of French cuisine. "I think that the French restaurants in all the big cities in the United Sates are a bit over-priced, high-end and fancy," he said. "I wanted to show that a bistro concept - a place where you can come in casually and find good food at a reasonable price in a nice atmosphere - has a place in an average-sized city.
FEATURES
By Michelle Huneven and Michelle Huneven,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | October 3, 2001
One night in Paris, two friends of mine took me to a tiny, modest cafe in the Sixth Arrondissement. It was one of countless dimly lighted establishments with battered chairs, tiny tables and a chalkboard menu. Wine and water arrived in unmarked glass decanters, and the waiter got up from his own aperitif to grudgingly take our orders. We'd had a large midday meal with family, so we ordered only salads, which were nothing exceptional, except that in France the lettuce actually has flavor.
NEWS
By Beth Smith | August 13, 1995
You know just what you like when you eat at one of the top restaurants in the Baltimore area. You have your favorites and you stick with them. But wait, what's that delicious-looking entree the guy at the next table is eating? And how about that gorgeous mile-high cake that's being wheeled by on the dessert cart? What's that all about?We thought it might be fun to find out just what Baltimore diners are ordering when they go out to eat -- to help us all expand our dining repertoire. And after talking to executive chefs, chefs, sous-chefs, owners, managers and maitre d's at a number of places around town and just beyond, we think we have the skinny on favorite foods at some of the favorite restaurants in the Baltimore area.
FEATURES
By Marie Bianco and Marie Bianco,Newsday | September 19, 1993
Americans have never been a nation of vegetable lovers. French fries, maybe, and some ketchup. Add a few leaves of iceberg lettuce and some corn on the cob during August, and you have the total vegetable consumption of many.One of the reasons we don't eat more vegetables is because they can be dull, especially now that butter and cheese sauce are verboten.Enter roasted vegetables. And one of their possible conclusions, the roasted vegetable terrine. As we knew them, vegetable terrines consisted of layers of pureed vegetables cooked so long that they lose all their taste.
FEATURES
By JANICE BAKER | October 7, 1990
A year ago, Georges Chaubron, owner and chef of L'Auberge, took his headwaiter, Scott Curran, to France. They started off in Mr. Chaubron's native Lyons, and then moved on to Rhone wine country. Though Mr. Curran's original motive for working at L'Auberge was to earn money for art school, France and wine changed all that. "Now," he says, "no matter what, I'm here at L'Auberge."In all sorts of ways, Mr. Chaubron has proved himself a masterfuteacher and cicerone, with authority derived the hard way -- from a thorough knowledge of cooking and restaurant management.
NEWS
By Beth Smith | August 13, 1995
You know just what you like when you eat at one of the top restaurants in the Baltimore area. You have your favorites and you stick with them. But wait, what's that delicious-looking entree the guy at the next table is eating? And how about that gorgeous mile-high cake that's being wheeled by on the dessert cart? What's that all about?We thought it might be fun to find out just what Baltimore diners are ordering when they go out to eat -- to help us all expand our dining repertoire. And after talking to executive chefs, chefs, sous-chefs, owners, managers and maitre d's at a number of places around town and just beyond, we think we have the skinny on favorite foods at some of the favorite restaurants in the Baltimore area.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynn Williams and Lynn Williams,Sun Restaurant Critic | July 5, 1991
Feeling frazzled? In this weather, it's hard not to. If you can't escape to other latitudes, try an escape to the 18th century. In candlelit rooms of brick and beam, fussed over by an attentive, gracious staff, you can forget you ever heard the word "stress."Pampering? The Treaty of Paris, in Annapolis' historic Maryland Inn, might have invented the concept. (The treaty in question ended America's revolution against monarchy, but the restaurant that honors it certainly treats its customers as royalty.
FEATURES
By Janice Baker | June 2, 1991
Some restaurants beam out self-amused messages, some look old, wise, inured to any eventuality, some feel tentative, others are evangelical about some point of view. According to my reading of Hampton's, at around 5 o'clock, before the early diners ascend those lovely, carpeted stairs, the restaurant straightens its rose-curtained shoulders and whispers reassuring adjectives to itself: I'm expensive, I'm young, I'm glossy and I'm ambitious. It won't smile gently and add "seasoned" for several years yet.In the meantime, it offers youthful energy and drive.
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