Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTerrence Mcnally
IN THE NEWS

Terrence Mcnally

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Newsday | May 12, 1993
Playwright Terrence McNally has been chosen winner of the John Steinbeck Award, the annual prize awarded to writers living on the east end of New York's Long Island.The award was presented last week by Elaine Steinbeck, the widow of the Nobel Prize-winning author.She said this year's prize to Mr. McNally was special because the playwright was once a virtual member of the Steinbeck family.In the early 1960s "he went on a 10-month trip with John and me and our two sons," she said.Mr. McNally tutored the two teen-agers as the family traveled from Greece to England.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 31, 2010
More than 30 years after her death, soprano Maria Callas remains the benchmark for interpretive intensity and insight in opera. That's one reason why Terrence McNally's first Callas-centric play, "The Lisbon Traviata," has retained such potency since its 1985 premiere. The other reason for this comic-tragic work's success, of course, is that it's just so entertaining, a point reaffirmed by the Kennedy Center's handsome new production -- one of three operatically attuned plays by McNally being presented at the center.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1998
What would happen if Jesus Christ had been born a gay man in Corpus Christi, Texas, during the 1960s?A new play that tries to answer that question has touched off the latest salvo in what has been dubbed the "culture wars" between liberal and conservative advocates.But unlike earlier controversies, which most often occurred in relatively out-of-the-way venues or provincial cities, last week's shot was in New York, the culture capital of the country, where playwright Terrence McNally's "Corpus Christi" opened amid street protests, heightened security and -- given all the hoopla -- surprisingly lukewarm reviews.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 1, 2001
Although the musical "Ragtime" starts out as the story of three families, it is ultimately the story of one vast family - the family that is America. This epic subject is captured in soaring melodies and characterizations in the musical adaptation of E.L. Doctorow's 1975 novel. True, the scenically lean touring production at the Mechanic Theatre at times veers toward oratorio. But the gripping performances of several key members of the large, accomplished cast and the intricately crafted script - adapted by Terrence McNally - keep the action involving.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Terrence McNally's time has come.Winner of the 1995 Tony Award for "Love! Valour! Compassion!" he had a new play produced even before he won the award.The new play, "Master Class," opens on Broadway tonight after sold-out runs in Philadelphia, Los Angeles and Washington.In addition, the touring production of McNally's previous Tony Award winner, the musical "Kiss of the Spider Woman," opens at the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre on Wednesday. And many of his two dozen other shows are being revived at theaters across the country.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 6, 1997
The AXIS Theatre's 1997-1998 season begins with Terrence McNally's Tony award-winning romance, "Love! Valour! Compassion!" Sept. 4 through Oct. 5. The U.S. premiere of Timothy Daly's "Kafka Dances" will be performed Oct. 23 through Nov. 23. Daniel Sullivan's holiday comedy, "Inspecting Carol," returns to the AXIS for a second run Dec. 11 through Jan. 18. A comedy about a dog, "Sylvia," A. R. Gurney's off-Broadway hit, will be staged Feb. 5 through March...
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 23, 1995
George Bernard Shaw coined the expression: "He who can, does. He who cannot, teaches." And near the end of her life, when her voice failed, legendary soprano Maria Callas exemplified that notion by teaching a series of master classes at Juilliard.Playwright and Callas devotee Terrence McNally was in the audience at those classes, which form the basis for "Master Class," now at Washington's Kennedy Center prior to Broadway. But this latest script by last season's Tony Award-winning playwright is much more than a fictionalized transcription or a valentine to "La Divina" from an ardent fan. It is that rare example of a play that does what it is about: It not only professes the power of art, it demonstrates it.McNally wrote "Master Class" for Zoe Caldwell, and much of its power is due to the actress' tour-de-force, Tony-caliber transformation into Callas, under Leonard Foglia's direction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | October 11, 1991
"Frankie & Johnny" is a mediocre movie that was made from a wonderful play. Terrence McNally's original, "Frankie and Johnny the Clair de Lune," was terrific because it focused so exclusively upon Johnny's hunger for love and upon Frankie's desper"Frankie & Johnny" is a mediocre movie that was made from a wonderful play. Terrence McNally's original, "Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune," was terrific because it focused so exclusively upon Johnny's hunger for love and upon Frankie's desperate fear of it. Even the sexual scenes between the two characters -- as well as their contentious bickering -- became metaphors for the battle between the lonely citadels of self-sufficiency.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | September 17, 1995
Violinist and pianist in recitalAchamber music performance that is likely to be among the season's most distinguished -- and at a price that can't be beat -- can be heard today at 3:30 p.m. at the Second Presbyterian Church (4200 St. Paul St.), when violinist Earl Carlyss and pianist Ann Schein join forces for a free joint recital. The distinguished violinist and pianist -- who are husband and wife -- will perform sonatas and duets by Schubert, Respighi and Tom Benjamin. Free tickets are available at the door.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 31, 2010
More than 30 years after her death, soprano Maria Callas remains the benchmark for interpretive intensity and insight in opera. That's one reason why Terrence McNally's first Callas-centric play, "The Lisbon Traviata," has retained such potency since its 1985 premiere. The other reason for this comic-tragic work's success, of course, is that it's just so entertaining, a point reaffirmed by the Kennedy Center's handsome new production -- one of three operatically attuned plays by McNally being presented at the center.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 29, 2000
The concept behind the film was one of the more intriguing of the television season: Three gay playwrights explore homosexuality in three different decades in the same small town. The result, "Common Ground," which premieres at 8 tonight on the Showtime cable channel, delivers on the promise with a touching and uncommonly wise film about gay identity and some of the dominant culture's most cherished values. The trio of playwrights gathered for this project was remarkable: Tony Award winners Terrence McNally ("Kiss of the Spiderwoman" and "Ragtime")
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1998
What would happen if Jesus Christ had been born a gay man in Corpus Christi, Texas, during the 1960s?A new play that tries to answer that question has touched off the latest salvo in what has been dubbed the "culture wars" between liberal and conservative advocates.But unlike earlier controversies, which most often occurred in relatively out-of-the-way venues or provincial cities, last week's shot was in New York, the culture capital of the country, where playwright Terrence McNally's "Corpus Christi" opened amid street protests, heightened security and -- given all the hoopla -- surprisingly lukewarm reviews.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 7, 1998
The last line of an article on the Tony Awards was inadvertently omitted in yesterday's Arts & Society section. The final paragraph should have read:Twenty years from now, when your neighborhood dinner theater, community theater or high school stages "Ragtime," it will still be a great musical. But when -- or if -- they stage "The Lion King," it will still be a cartoon.The Sun regrets the errors.NEW YORK - "The Lion King" vs. "Ragtime." Tonight's Tony Award competition for best musical boils down to a spirited race between two shows that, on the surface, have several things in common.
FEATURES
By Karin Remesch and Karin Remesch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 6, 1997
The AXIS Theatre's 1997-1998 season begins with Terrence McNally's Tony award-winning romance, "Love! Valour! Compassion!" Sept. 4 through Oct. 5. The U.S. premiere of Timothy Daly's "Kafka Dances" will be performed Oct. 23 through Nov. 23. Daniel Sullivan's holiday comedy, "Inspecting Carol," returns to the AXIS for a second run Dec. 11 through Jan. 18. A comedy about a dog, "Sylvia," A. R. Gurney's off-Broadway hit, will be staged Feb. 5 through March...
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Terrence McNally's time has come.Winner of the 1995 Tony Award for "Love! Valour! Compassion!" he had a new play produced even before he won the award.The new play, "Master Class," opens on Broadway tonight after sold-out runs in Philadelphia, Los Angeles and Washington.In addition, the touring production of McNally's previous Tony Award winner, the musical "Kiss of the Spider Woman," opens at the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre on Wednesday. And many of his two dozen other shows are being revived at theaters across the country.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | September 23, 1995
George Bernard Shaw coined the expression: "He who can, does. He who cannot, teaches." And near the end of her life, when her voice failed, legendary soprano Maria Callas exemplified that notion by teaching a series of master classes at Juilliard.Playwright and Callas devotee Terrence McNally was in the audience at those classes, which form the basis for "Master Class," now at Washington's Kennedy Center prior to Broadway. But this latest script by last season's Tony Award-winning playwright is much more than a fictionalized transcription or a valentine to "La Divina" from an ardent fan. It is that rare example of a play that does what it is about: It not only professes the power of art, it demonstrates it.McNally wrote "Master Class" for Zoe Caldwell, and much of its power is due to the actress' tour-de-force, Tony-caliber transformation into Callas, under Leonard Foglia's direction.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | March 19, 1995
'Tiefland' will be staged in WashingtonThe Washington's Opera's production of Eugen d'Albert's "Tiefland" has to be counted among the nation's major operatic events this season. This tale of lust and power -- perhaps the only successful example in German opera of what was called "verismo" in Italian opera -- created a sensation at the beginning of the century. It was produced everywhere -- once even opening the Met's season -- and was a staple of the repertory for years. "Tiefland" now seems confined to Germany, and the Washington Opera's production, which will be conducted by Heinz Fricke, is the first in at least 80 years.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 7, 1998
The last line of an article on the Tony Awards was inadvertently omitted in yesterday's Arts & Society section. The final paragraph should have read:Twenty years from now, when your neighborhood dinner theater, community theater or high school stages "Ragtime," it will still be a great musical. But when -- or if -- they stage "The Lion King," it will still be a cartoon.The Sun regrets the errors.NEW YORK - "The Lion King" vs. "Ragtime." Tonight's Tony Award competition for best musical boils down to a spirited race between two shows that, on the surface, have several things in common.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | September 17, 1995
Violinist and pianist in recitalAchamber music performance that is likely to be among the season's most distinguished -- and at a price that can't be beat -- can be heard today at 3:30 p.m. at the Second Presbyterian Church (4200 St. Paul St.), when violinist Earl Carlyss and pianist Ann Schein join forces for a free joint recital. The distinguished violinist and pianist -- who are husband and wife -- will perform sonatas and duets by Schubert, Respighi and Tom Benjamin. Free tickets are available at the door.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | March 19, 1995
'Tiefland' will be staged in WashingtonThe Washington's Opera's production of Eugen d'Albert's "Tiefland" has to be counted among the nation's major operatic events this season. This tale of lust and power -- perhaps the only successful example in German opera of what was called "verismo" in Italian opera -- created a sensation at the beginning of the century. It was produced everywhere -- once even opening the Met's season -- and was a staple of the repertory for years. "Tiefland" now seems confined to Germany, and the Washington Opera's production, which will be conducted by Heinz Fricke, is the first in at least 80 years.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.