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By Elizabeth Large | June 5, 1994
A waist-high black terra-cotta pot filled with plants could jazz up your back yard, or you could add an ethnic touch to your sun porch with an abstract black terra-cotta horse.Rita Santosh imports the unusual black terra-cotta ware from India and sells it in her new store, Rare Earth, in the Owings Mill Mall. You'll find the handsome shop, filled with pottery and plants, on the first level between Macy's and the American Cafe. For more information, call (410) 581-2077.Old sofas need never dieGreg Imhoff can reupholster that old sofa you bought with your first apartment, but what he really loves to work on is antique furniture.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By SUSAN REIMER | June 11, 2009
I consider container gardens the accessories in a landscape. Sort of like the Harry Winston diamonds, the Miu Miu clutch and the Jimmy Choo shoes on Oscar night: nice, but the dress is what really matters. The same is true in the garden. Once you have done the heavy lifting in the yard - the cleanup, the dividing and pruning and the mulching - you can take your time designing the "mini me's" of gardens -- the containers. Containers can accessorize your deck or add curb appeal to your entranceway.
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NEWS
March 2, 1997
THE MANDATE OF HEAVEN determines who reigns in China. The Communists won that mandate in 1949, regimenting the empire. Whether they will last, like Han and Ming dynasties, must be doubted. More likely, the Communists will depart leaving permanent works, like the Qin dynasty of the third century B.C., whose military, economic and bureaucratic achievements are on view at "The First Emperor" show at the Walters Art Gallery starting today.China, its great literary and religious age over, was small warring states.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to the Sun | January 11, 2008
With the restoration of so many of Baltimore's once grand homes, many are becoming gracious again. Among them: Marianne Githens' magnificent Greek Revival style home in Mount Vernon. She and her now deceased husband, Stanley Z. Mazer, purchased the circa 1840 freestanding home of Maryland stone and brick nearly 14 years ago. The attraction for the couple was immediate. It featured a large front garden enclosed by an original G. Krug & Son wrought-iron fence with the original finials. Beyond the gate, a cast-iron rose arbor welcomed them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | November 17, 2005
MIXED MEDIA Gallery Imperato will display sculptures by Gayle Fichtinger and paintings by Randi Reiss-McCormack Saturday through Dec. 23. Some of Reiss-McCormack's pieces are painted fabric and others are canvas. Fichtinger's figurative sculptures are terra cotta. There will be a reception from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. Gallery Imperato is at 921 E. Fort Ave., Suite 120. Call 443-257-4166 or visit www.gallery imperato.com.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie & Randy Johnson | October 26, 1997
IT WASN'T the dog fur, or the dryer lint, or the scraps from laundering the rag rugs that clogged up the main drain leading from Karol's house to the sewer connection at the street."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1998
Henry Berge, noted Baltimore sculptor who was a master of the bas-relief, took his own life Sunday at his home in Roland Park. He was 90.Mr. Berge, who had a remarkably prolific career that spanned nearly 70 years, had been suffering in recent months from bouts of depression, said family members.The artist was still working in his Roland Park studio-home, where he had lived since 1959.Born and raised near Clifton Park in Northeast Baltimore, Mr. Berge was the son of the acclaimed Baltimore sculptor Edward Berge, who was best known for his studies of children.
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Tribune Media Services | September 23, 2007
We've chosen cherry cabinetry in a medium color as the first step in remodeling our kitchen and breakfast area. What should we do about the flooring and countertops? I've seen wood-planked flooring in a color similar to the cabinetry, but it's quite expensive. We want to give the space a cheerful and contemporary look. Since you seem partial to wood, I suggest you think hard about planked flooring, though not in a color similar to your cherry cabinetry. Keep in mind that hardwood floors can actually prove an economical choice, given their durability and ease of maintenance.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2002
The bell tower in the Rotunda shopping center building is close to tolling clock chimes again after a five-year silence. And those Roman numerals will be watched once again. Overlooking a panorama of the city -- from Hampden and Roland Park to the downtown skyline -- foreman Steven Sadler stood on the Rotunda roof near the belfry Friday and explained why workers used the technique of "speckling" thumbtack-sized dots of black paint on the tower's terra cotta. "It's to make the terra cotta look original," said Sadler, who works for Worcester Eisenbrandt Inc. His team's intricate workmanship can't been seen from the streets below, but Sadler expects the look to last.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | February 11, 2001
It can be argued -- as novelist Jay McInerney did in his wine column in a recent issue of House & Garden magazine -- that the cocktail hour is the brash American equivalent of British teatime. While there's much to be said for a martini, there's also a great deal in favor of tea -- the accoutrements are so charmingly traditional, for instance: teapots, tea cups and saucers, silver spoons and tiny tea napkins. Unless you're one of 71 artists in the "100 Teapots" show at Baltimore Clayworks (through Feb. 24)
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Tribune Media Services | September 23, 2007
We've chosen cherry cabinetry in a medium color as the first step in remodeling our kitchen and breakfast area. What should we do about the flooring and countertops? I've seen wood-planked flooring in a color similar to the cabinetry, but it's quite expensive. We want to give the space a cheerful and contemporary look. Since you seem partial to wood, I suggest you think hard about planked flooring, though not in a color similar to your cherry cabinetry. Keep in mind that hardwood floors can actually prove an economical choice, given their durability and ease of maintenance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | November 17, 2005
MIXED MEDIA Gallery Imperato will display sculptures by Gayle Fichtinger and paintings by Randi Reiss-McCormack Saturday through Dec. 23. Some of Reiss-McCormack's pieces are painted fabric and others are canvas. Fichtinger's figurative sculptures are terra cotta. There will be a reception from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday. Gallery Imperato is at 921 E. Fort Ave., Suite 120. Call 443-257-4166 or visit www.gallery imperato.com.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 3, 2004
On Wheeling Street in Federal Hill, rows of narrow, two- and three-story brick houses line the curbs, in a domino-like fashion. Their carefully restored facades, featuring wide window shutters and front doors with bright brass knockers, recall Baltimore's Colonial seaport past. Artist and photographer, Linnie Greene owns an end-of-group on this charming street. It includes a multi-paned storefront window and a painted exterior trim in Mexican-inspired shades of coral and aqua. Flower boxes attached to the second- and third-story windows drip purple and green foliage.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,SUN COLUMNIST | May 12, 2002
Potted plants aren't just for Mother's Day anymore. Like everything else in the garden, that single geranium in the clay pot on the front porch has grown and spread. It is now a "container garden," which can mean anything from a single large pot planted thick with a dozen plants to a collection of ornate pots each planted with a single variety and grouped in the corner of a deck or patio. Container gardens are even finding their way into the real garden, where they surprise the eye or contain an invasive mint.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2002
The bell tower in the Rotunda shopping center building is close to tolling clock chimes again after a five-year silence. And those Roman numerals will be watched once again. Overlooking a panorama of the city -- from Hampden and Roland Park to the downtown skyline -- foreman Steven Sadler stood on the Rotunda roof near the belfry Friday and explained why workers used the technique of "speckling" thumbtack-sized dots of black paint on the tower's terra cotta. "It's to make the terra cotta look original," said Sadler, who works for Worcester Eisenbrandt Inc. His team's intricate workmanship can't been seen from the streets below, but Sadler expects the look to last.
NEWS
By Marty Ross and Marty Ross,Universal Press Syndicate | August 19, 2001
Labels bring order to the riot of buds and blooms of every enthusiastic gardener's growing collection of fine plants. They have the same function as nametags at a big cocktail party. Garden plants are not just anonymous clumps of vegetation, and labels help put you on a first-name basis with your flowers. Plant labels also express a gardener's style. A colorful pottery label stamped "chives," poised on a wire stake like a lollipop, is as much a part of the decorative scheme as the pretty herbs around it. A professional-looking zinc label, with the plant's scientific name printed out by a label maker, tips you off that this is the garden of a serious connoisseur of plants.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1999
AS PART of the rejuvenation of the Mount Vernon and Cathedral Hill historic districts, one of Baltimore's most important architectural and religious landmarks is about to get a face lift.Leaders of First Unitarian Church of Baltimore recently hired Gould Architects P.A. of Baltimore to assess the condition of the neoclassical structure at Charles and Franklin streets and develop a preservation and modernization plan that will prepare it for continued use in the 21st century.The commission calls for the architects to evaluate the building in the context of its structural integrity and the way it functions for religious purposes.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 3, 2004
On Wheeling Street in Federal Hill, rows of narrow, two- and three-story brick houses line the curbs, in a domino-like fashion. Their carefully restored facades, featuring wide window shutters and front doors with bright brass knockers, recall Baltimore's Colonial seaport past. Artist and photographer, Linnie Greene owns an end-of-group on this charming street. It includes a multi-paned storefront window and a painted exterior trim in Mexican-inspired shades of coral and aqua. Flower boxes attached to the second- and third-story windows drip purple and green foliage.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | February 11, 2001
It can be argued -- as novelist Jay McInerney did in his wine column in a recent issue of House & Garden magazine -- that the cocktail hour is the brash American equivalent of British teatime. While there's much to be said for a martini, there's also a great deal in favor of tea -- the accoutrements are so charmingly traditional, for instance: teapots, tea cups and saucers, silver spoons and tiny tea napkins. Unless you're one of 71 artists in the "100 Teapots" show at Baltimore Clayworks (through Feb. 24)
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | August 1, 1999
On the cusp of a new millennium, an ancient idea in gardening is back in vogue.Urns -- most recently ever-present in Victorian gardens or conservatories -- are everywhere. The classic Greco-Roman shape, with a pedestal base and bowl or vase-shaped top, is still a graceful touch in almost any garden, large or small."Classic styling goes with everything," said Melissa Darnay, marketing manager at American Designer Pottery. The Dallas-based company has recently introduced a line of urns that are made, not of the traditional metal or stone, but of synthetic material that weighs only a tenth as much.
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