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January 16, 2002
Aardwolves' coats are light brown color with an orange tint and are striped with dark brown bands. Their fur is long and coarse with bushy tails and a mane or crest along their backs which stands up when frightened. They weigh 50 to 60 pounds and are 20 inches tall. what's for DINNER? Aardwolves eat termites and insect larvae. do you KNOW? What family are aardwolves a member of? Answer: Aardwolves are a member of the hyena family and are closely related to the mongoose and meerkat.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
I used to have dozens of monarch butterflies in my garden — now almost none. How can I attract them again? Research showed that the precipitous decline in monarchs a couple of years ago was mainly because of extreme weather, illegal logging in Mexico and herbicide use, which have almost wiped out the food source of monarchs — milkweed. We can't counter the first two causes but we can plant milkweed or ornamentals in the milkweed family such as butterfly weed. Without a food source for monarch caterpillars to eat, there can be no monarchs.
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NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Sun Staff Writer | April 25, 1995
Someone once joked to Councilman Anthony J. Ambridge that his office at Baltimore City Hall probably was bugged. Yesterday, in a creepy-crawly sort of way, he discovered it was true.Mr. Ambridge arrived at work to find his office teeming with termites. Swarms of the destructive insects covered his desk and chair. A black cloud had settled on the walls."I went in to get something, and I feel creepy all over," said Mr. Ambridge, a Democrat who represents East Baltimore's 2nd District.A janitor quickly sprayed insecticide and sealed off Mr. Ambridge's office to prevent the termites from invading other council offices on the fifth floor of City Hall.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | June 25, 2009
As if the mosquitoes weren't bad enough, the rainy weather in recent weeks has also brought out another insect pest - swarming termites, streaming up out of the ground, or the woodwork. Michael Short, an inspector for J.C. Ehrlich Pest Control in Baltimore, was called recently to a home in Owings Mills. The winged critters were "all over the floor in the foyer, literally covering the foyer," he said. "The customer was obviously very concerned." The bugs weren't out to eat the house, just to mate and establish new colonies.
NEWS
By NANCY JONES-BONBREST and NANCY JONES-BONBREST,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 3, 2006
Bill Kidd Inspector Terminix/Towson Earnings --$83,000, which includes a base salary and sales commissions. Age: 35 Years on the job --2.5 How he got started --Kidd ran his own real estate investment company in New Jersey. During the sale of his own home, he worked with a Terminix representative who impressed him. When his business didn't work out, Kidd completed a three-month training program and test to become a Terminix inspector. He originally worked in New Jersey but moved to the Baltimore area last year because it was a growing market.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Sun Staff Writer | April 14, 1994
Eight years ago, Kevin Lassiter looked at the sparkling new townhouses in the Oliver-Johnston II community and saw a peaceful oasis in a depressed East Baltimore neighborhood."
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | February 21, 1999
SOME items from the mailbag:Here's something else you can blame on El Nino: Termites loved the mild winter. But there is some good news: A new product developed by the Environmental Laboratories Co., in North East, Cecil County, can improve the appearance of your home and fight termite infestations.It's called Term-A-Rid 613, and it's a decorative mulch that contains a naturally occurring element that interferes with termites' digestion, killing them. The mulch is completely degradable and nonthreatening to the environment.
FEATURES
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to The Sun | August 26, 2006
A pesticide guy came to my door and said that he'd treated a house nearby for termites and that our neighborhood had a lot of insects. I haven't noticed any problems. Should I take his offer? The short answer is "no." Termites are native here and help us by disposing of dead wood and aerating the soil. They are present in all neighborhoods. Most houses will never have a problem with them. Big tree roots make mowing my lawn harder every year. It's impossible to ride the mower in some areas, not to mention the mower is slicing the top off roots, too. Can I cover those big roots with dirt or just cut them off?
BUSINESS
By Adele Evans and Adele Evans,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 2, 2002
When Amy Wood noticed what looked to be ants with wings swarming around her garage, she had no idea that her property was under attack. With a last name like Wood, wouldn't it be ironic if termites were the enemy? Unfortunately, for Wood, they were. And even after spending $1,000 to rid her place of the insects, they still swarmed the next spring and a follow-up treatment was needed. The only symptom that termites were eating away at her garage came when she noticed the swarming - a common way people find out there's a problem.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2012
I used to have dozens of monarch butterflies in my garden — now almost none. How can I attract them again? Research showed that the precipitous decline in monarchs a couple of years ago was mainly because of extreme weather, illegal logging in Mexico and herbicide use, which have almost wiped out the food source of monarchs — milkweed. We can't counter the first two causes but we can plant milkweed or ornamentals in the milkweed family such as butterfly weed. Without a food source for monarch caterpillars to eat, there can be no monarchs.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to the Sun | June 28, 2008
My pin oak tree was struck by lightning last week and has long strips of outer bark completely blasted away. Can or should we do anything to cover these scars? There have been successful bark replacements, but they must be performed immediately after the damage. Wound dressing is not recommended because it interferes with the tree's efforts to heal the wound. Lightning either moves in a narrow line down a tree's branches and trunk to the roots or in a wide path around the entire tree cylinder.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Sun | August 17, 2007
After living for 15 years in the historic district of Annapolis, Kevin and Theresa Reville decided to pick up stakes and settle along the banks of Rideout Creek, a scenic body of water between the Severn and Magothy rivers in Anne Arundel County. "I cried for the first six months after we moved here," Theresa Reville said about the February 2004 purchase. It was not so much buyer's remorse that distressed the 40-year-old real estate agent, even though she and her husband had spent $1.4 million on a property that would require extensive renovation.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | June 9, 2007
What's shakin' in Pasadena? Karen Kreczmer writes: "This is going to sound weird, but my husband wanted me to ask you how come, when it's really windy out, the water in the toilet bowl moves around so much?" Karen and her husband, Elmer, say they don't live on a boat or in a high-rise. They're on city water, in a freestanding, frame home, somewhat exposed on a hill a half-mile from the water. Seems to me the wind is shaking the house. Check for termites, Elmer. Readers?
FEATURES
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to The Sun | August 26, 2006
A pesticide guy came to my door and said that he'd treated a house nearby for termites and that our neighborhood had a lot of insects. I haven't noticed any problems. Should I take his offer? The short answer is "no." Termites are native here and help us by disposing of dead wood and aerating the soil. They are present in all neighborhoods. Most houses will never have a problem with them. Big tree roots make mowing my lawn harder every year. It's impossible to ride the mower in some areas, not to mention the mower is slicing the top off roots, too. Can I cover those big roots with dirt or just cut them off?
NEWS
By NANCY JONES-BONBREST and NANCY JONES-BONBREST,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 3, 2006
Bill Kidd Inspector Terminix/Towson Earnings --$83,000, which includes a base salary and sales commissions. Age: 35 Years on the job --2.5 How he got started --Kidd ran his own real estate investment company in New Jersey. During the sale of his own home, he worked with a Terminix representative who impressed him. When his business didn't work out, Kidd completed a three-month training program and test to become a Terminix inspector. He originally worked in New Jersey but moved to the Baltimore area last year because it was a growing market.
FEATURES
By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI and JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 2006
An e-mail warned to watch out for New Orleans mulch infested with Formosan termites. What's the scoop? A quarantine prohibits shipping wood debris from the entire hurricane-devastated region to stop spread of these aggressive non-native termites. In a perfect world, none will escape the quarantine. It's doubtful any would survive the chipping process anyway, but an easy precaution for Marylanders is to purchase mulch produced in our region. Termites occasionally get into bagged mulch that has been sitting around, and this is nothing new. Our local termites sometimes do this.
FEATURES
By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI and JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 18, 2006
An e-mail warned to watch out for New Orleans mulch infested with Formosan termites. What's the scoop? A quarantine prohibits shipping wood debris from the entire hurricane-devastated region to stop spread of these aggressive non-native termites. In a perfect world, none will escape the quarantine. It's doubtful any would survive the chipping process anyway, but an easy precaution for Marylanders is to purchase mulch produced in our region. Termites occasionally get into bagged mulch that has been sitting around, and this is nothing new. Our local termites sometimes do this.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | June 9, 2007
What's shakin' in Pasadena? Karen Kreczmer writes: "This is going to sound weird, but my husband wanted me to ask you how come, when it's really windy out, the water in the toilet bowl moves around so much?" Karen and her husband, Elmer, say they don't live on a boat or in a high-rise. They're on city water, in a freestanding, frame home, somewhat exposed on a hill a half-mile from the water. Seems to me the wind is shaking the house. Check for termites, Elmer. Readers?
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff | August 19, 2005
When chimpanzees in the famed Gombe National Park in Tanzania pick up sticks and poke them into termite mounds in pursuit of a tasty snack, most use their left hands. In fact, when researchers worked out the numbers, they found that -- at least when they're fishing for termites -- the Gombe chimps are left-handed by a better than 2-to-1 margin. By combing through prior chimp studies, researchers also found evidence that about twice as many chimps use their right hands to hammer nuts open with rocks and to sop up water with crumpled leaves.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2005
Dear Mr. Azrael: My friend purchased her home about four years ago and at the time of the purchase, the seller disclosed that there was a termite problem that had been addressed by a pest control company. The seller indicated that all termite damage to the home had been repaired. My friend recently hired someone to do the painting in her living room because there were several large unusual looking cracks in the walls that needed to be repaired, which she assumed was due to settlement, etc. When the painter/repairman cut the wall to remove the damaged sections, it was discovered that there was quite a bit of "old termite" damage that had never been repaired.
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