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By NEWSDAY | February 7, 1997
More than 60 doctors treating AIDS patients in the San Francisco area say they have prescribed lethal doses of medication to help terminally ill patients end their own lives, according to a survey published in yesterday's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.Experts say the survey of 118 physicians -- 53 percent of whom said they have helped at least one dying patient commit suicide -- is the nation's largest reported example of doctor-assisted suicide."At least in San Francisco, a surprisingly large number of doctors said they have done it -- particularly given the legal and medical repercussions," said Lee R. Slome, lead author of the survey.
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NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | January 15, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court yesterday upheld the government's authority to restrict access to experimental drugs, even if the drugs might help dying patients who have run out of other options. In a one-line decision, the court declined to hear the appeal of terminally ill patients who argued that they had a constitutional right to try unproven but promising treatments. "It's a tragedy," said Frank Burroughs, who has led the fight for expanded access since his 21-year-old daughter, Abigail, died while trying to get an experimental cancer treatment at Johns Hopkins Hospital in 2001.
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NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | November 18, 1992
A new unit of Carroll County General Hospital will include two suites where terminally ill patients can be kept comfortable without aggressive efforts to "cure" them.The unit, which will cost about $700,000 to build, is scheduled to open in April 1993.It will have 34 beds, 24 to replace an existing unit and 10 added to meet projected demand. Most of the beds will be for medical and surgical patients, who also can be housed in hospice suites if they are vacant.The hospice suites will allow patients "to be in peace in a beautiful place and to be absolutely comfortable," said Julie Flaherty, executive director of Carroll Hospice.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | February 28, 2007
A nonprofit social services agency that provides food to HIV/AIDS patients and other terminally ill people in the Baltimore area may be forced to turn away 175 of its clients beginning tomorrow because of funding recommendations that have decreased the group's federal support by half. Moveable Feast is set to lose about $165,000 of its annual funding through the Ryan White Care Act because of directives made by Associated Black Charities, the agency contracted by the city to make funding recommendations for charities receiving federal AIDS money, according to Victor Basile, Moveable Feast's executive director.
NEWS
August 6, 2000
Police seek three robbers in Hanover home invasion A grandmother hid in a closet with her granddaughter early Friday morning after three armed robbers forced their way into the woman's house in Hanover and stole cash from a young couple and a friend who were staying there, police said. As one of the visitors ran to a house across the street to call for help, one of the robbers fired a shotgun into the neighbor's front window, Anne Arundel County police said. No one was injured during the incident, which occurred about 4 a.m. in the 7600 block of Watts Ave., said Sgt. Thomas Wilson, head of the robbery unit.
NEWS
April 1, 1999
THERE'S LITTLE to admire about Jack Kevorkian or his antics. There's little, therefore, to mourn about his recent conviction for second-degree murder in the death of Thomas Youk.But the discussion about the concerns and rights of terminally ill patients that Kevorkian's actions over the years has spawned has been healthy -- if not conclusive.Unlike the previous trials in which Kevorkian was acquitted, Mr. Youk did not flip a switch on the doctor's suicide machine. Kevorkian administered a lethal injection to the man, who suffered from Lou Gehrig's disease.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 28, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A federal appeals court set the stage yesterday for doctors in Oregon to begin providing lethal medicine so that terminally ill patients in that state can commit suicide.Unless that ruling is blocked by new legal maneuvers from opponents, an Oregon law that authorizes doctor-assisted suicides -- the first such law in the nation -- will take effect in three weeks.A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in hTC San Francisco threw out a constitutional challenge to a ballot proposal that Oregon's voters approved in November 1994.
NEWS
By Staff Report | April 1, 1993
Carroll County General Hospital will have an open house from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday to introduce a new medical-surgical nursing unit.The 34 beds in the third-floor unit replace a 24-bed unit and bring the hospital's total to 158.The unit includes two suites where terminally ill patients can be kept comfortable without aggressive efforts to "cure" them.Hospital officials have said that hospice patients will not be subjected to unnecessary procedures.Staff members will be available during the open house to describe the unit.
NEWS
November 28, 1994
Voters in Oregon put the medical profession on notice earlier this month when they approved a "Death with Dignity" ballot measure setting out conditions under which physicians can prescribe a fatal dose of drugs for terminally ill patients. Plenty of doctors don't want that power, and the American Medical Association joined religious groups in campaigning fervently against the measure. But Oregon is not the first state to contemplate such a measure -- and it won't be the last.The new Oregon law, which takes effect next month, specifically forbids the kind of active euthanasia practiced in the Netherlands.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | January 15, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court yesterday upheld the government's authority to restrict access to experimental drugs, even if the drugs might help dying patients who have run out of other options. In a one-line decision, the court declined to hear the appeal of terminally ill patients who argued that they had a constitutional right to try unproven but promising treatments. "It's a tragedy," said Frank Burroughs, who has led the fight for expanded access since his 21-year-old daughter, Abigail, died while trying to get an experimental cancer treatment at Johns Hopkins Hospital in 2001.
NEWS
January 18, 2006
In a victory for individual liberty as well as common sense, the U.S. Supreme Court yesterday rejected former Attorney General John Ashcroft's bid to unilaterally outlaw physician-assisted suicide. The court's 6-3 decision upholding Oregon's Death with Dignity law correctly slapped aside Mr. Ashcroft's claim that federal authority to regulate drugs allowed him to punish doctors who carry out dying patients' wishes by administering fatal medication in accordance with the state statute. He lacked not only the power but the medical expertise to justify such sweeping action, the court said.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2003
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. announced yesterday that he would likely back decriminalizing marijuana for terminally ill patients, a stance that is expected to give momentum to the issue this year in the General Assembly. Ehrlich said he has been a longtime supporter of so-called medical marijuana, including co-sponsoring a bill last year in Congress that would have allowed states to liberalize drug laws so terminally ill patients could use the drug. "I am predisposed to support it. It gets personal" for himself and his wife, Ehrlich said in an interview.
NEWS
August 6, 2000
Police seek three robbers in Hanover home invasion A grandmother hid in a closet with her granddaughter early Friday morning after three armed robbers forced their way into the woman's house in Hanover and stole cash from a young couple and a friend who were staying there, police said. As one of the visitors ran to a house across the street to call for help, one of the robbers fired a shotgun into the neighbor's front window, Anne Arundel County police said. No one was injured during the incident, which occurred about 4 a.m. in the 7600 block of Watts Ave., said Sgt. Thomas Wilson, head of the robbery unit.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1999
A Baltimore County jury awarded a terminally ill psychotherapist $3.1 million yesterday after deciding that her doctor failed to diagnose lymphoma for three years.The jury deliberated for 45 minutes before finding that Dr. John Mann, a Baltimore County internist, had breached the standard of care for his patient, Lynn Sklar, 52, of Randallstown.The weeklong trial in the courtroom of Baltimore County Circuit Judge Dana M. Levitz included medical experts who testified that Mann should have biopsied swollen lymph nodes in his patient's neck when she complained about pain in 1995, her lawyer said.
NEWS
April 1, 1999
THERE'S LITTLE to admire about Jack Kevorkian or his antics. There's little, therefore, to mourn about his recent conviction for second-degree murder in the death of Thomas Youk.But the discussion about the concerns and rights of terminally ill patients that Kevorkian's actions over the years has spawned has been healthy -- if not conclusive.Unlike the previous trials in which Kevorkian was acquitted, Mr. Youk did not flip a switch on the doctor's suicide machine. Kevorkian administered a lethal injection to the man, who suffered from Lou Gehrig's disease.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 28, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A federal appeals court set the stage yesterday for doctors in Oregon to begin providing lethal medicine so that terminally ill patients in that state can commit suicide.Unless that ruling is blocked by new legal maneuvers from opponents, an Oregon law that authorizes doctor-assisted suicides -- the first such law in the nation -- will take effect in three weeks.A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in hTC San Francisco threw out a constitutional challenge to a ballot proposal that Oregon's voters approved in November 1994.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1996
SOME PEOPLE think of a hospice as a place for dying.To Carol Peltier, it's just the opposite."It's about living," she says. "We're all about living every minute until you die."Peltier is the chief executive officer of Hospice of Baltimore, an organization that helps terminally ill patients live their final days with dignity.Since its founding 2 1/2 years ago, Hospice of Baltimore has operated a home care program through which nurses have treated more than 800 patients where they live.This week, it began a new phase of service when it opened the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care, an $8.3 million, 24-bed facility that provides an alternative to home care.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 9, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A historic plea to the Supreme Court to create a new constitutional right -- to allow terminally ill patients to get a doctor's help to commit suicide -- ran into heavy resistance and drew little support from the justices yesterday.In a hearing that revealed the justices' keen awareness that they were confronting the very nature of life, the court explored what it would mean now and in the future if they wrote into the Constitution a right to choose one's time to die.The issue has sparked a national debate that is becoming as emotionally explosive as the two-decades-long controversy over abortion rights.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | February 7, 1997
More than 60 doctors treating AIDS patients in the San Francisco area say they have prescribed lethal doses of medication to help terminally ill patients end their own lives, according to a survey published in yesterday's edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.Experts say the survey of 118 physicians -- 53 percent of whom said they have helped at least one dying patient commit suicide -- is the nation's largest reported example of doctor-assisted suicide."At least in San Francisco, a surprisingly large number of doctors said they have done it -- particularly given the legal and medical repercussions," said Lee R. Slome, lead author of the survey.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 9, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A historic plea to the Supreme Court to create a new constitutional right -- to allow terminally ill patients to get a doctor's help to commit suicide -- ran into heavy resistance and drew little support from the justices yesterday.In a hearing that revealed the justices' keen awareness that they were confronting the very nature of life, the court explored what it would mean now and in the future if they wrote into the Constitution a right to choose one's time to die.The issue has sparked a national debate that is becoming as emotionally explosive as the two-decades-long controversy over abortion rights.
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