Advertisement
HomeCollectionsTerminal Illness
IN THE NEWS

Terminal Illness

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 20, 1991
Tax laws and legal issues are complex. In many cases, a will isn't enough to safeguard your final wishes, which may include ++ medical instructions for a terminal illness.Here are three suggestions by Richard Stevens, director of personal financial services at Price Water house in Philadelphia:* Establish a trust fund for your life insurance proceeds to avoid paying unnecessary estate taxes.* Assign a power of attorney to someone you trust to manage your affairs or to appoint a manager in case you become disabled.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Alexa Fraser | September 28, 2014
One of the things that delights me in the people I love is their differences.  Each of my beloved family members behaved differently in life, so naturally each of them chose to die in their own way.  My dad, Alex Fraser, wanted control over the time and place of his death.  As his Parkinson's worsened, sometime after his 90 t h birthday, he decided to take action.  His health had been declining for some time, his tremor made it hard...
Advertisement
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 2, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Social Security Administration has agreed to expedite the disability claims of people with terminal illnesses following an embarrassing case in which an AIDS patient died before receiving his first check.Under the new policy -- sent to all 1,300 Social Security field offices Jan. 31 but not announced publicly -- people claiming a terminal illness will be moved to the front of the line for hearings and appeals, Social Security spokesman Phil Gambino said yesterday.The change in policy came after C. W. Johnson, a 49-year-old cook at a Washington restaurant who had acquired immune deficiency syndrome, waited 25 months for disability payments.
NEWS
April 27, 2014
I disagree, strongly, with Ms. Catalfamo's letter ( "Assisted suicide is not the answer," April 21), asserting that Del. Heather Mizeur's position on allowing aid in dying in Maryland is "perverted" and inconsistent with "a decent democracy. " For me, and for many other seniors, respect for and support of an individual's end-of-life choices is absolutely central to American principles and values. I believe that most of us are unable to imagine what it is like to suffer from a terminal illness.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler old sex tonight & | December 4, 1992
Memos5)To Maryland Blue Cross-Blue Shield:This is not a bill.To Comcast Cablevision:/# If you weren't charging so muchFor the signal, maybeStealing itWould be less tempting. i turned over in bedlooked at yousprawled across the sheetsa drop of saliva slidingfrom the corner of your mouththat god awful noise explodingfrom your nosetheni heavedrealizing it was only tuesdayd.r. fairOld Age So what?&If you stick around,you will baby-sit for the moonanyway.All it is is Love.Terminal IllnessI am proud,Even when it is timeTo show my sonhow one should die.H.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 15, 1991
Terminal illness can make for great television melodrama."An Early Frost" and "Brian's Song" are two memorable made-for-TV movies that dealt with the certain death of the leading character."
NEWS
By Medical Tribune News Service | February 16, 1991
A clear majority of elderly Americans oppose the use of life-sustaining medical technologies to prolong their lives, but most have neither signed living wills nor appointed someone to act on their behalf, two new studies indicate.A study of 103 residents at a Rockville nursing home reported that most of them did not want their lives extended by the use of respirators or feeding tubes.Ninety percent of the residents said that if necessary, they would choose a relative to make their health-care decisions for them.
NEWS
April 27, 2014
I disagree, strongly, with Ms. Catalfamo's letter ( "Assisted suicide is not the answer," April 21), asserting that Del. Heather Mizeur's position on allowing aid in dying in Maryland is "perverted" and inconsistent with "a decent democracy. " For me, and for many other seniors, respect for and support of an individual's end-of-life choices is absolutely central to American principles and values. I believe that most of us are unable to imagine what it is like to suffer from a terminal illness.
NEWS
November 20, 2011
Never have I read a more poignant and thought provoking opinion piece than Ron Smith's last column for The Sun ("My work here is done," Nov. 18). It seems cut and dried that realism is the proper philosophy when someone elects not to continue cancer treatment. But what about this idea called hope, the desire accompanied by expectation? Some oncologist or someone else might eventually come to say: "Hey, your tests have shown you are getting better. We've got a new promising drug that works wonders.
NEWS
June 4, 1996
Clinton cartoon viciously venomousI wish to express my abhorrence and revulsion at the venomous, vicious, tasteless and disgusting May 24 editorial page cartoon drawn by Mike Lane. I think it was an unwarranted insult to the position and person of the president and commander-in-chief, who has conducted himself admirably since taking office and whose character and past were judged and voted on in November 1992.President Clinton is certainly subject to legitimate criticism of his administration and his decision-making.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
A gay couple from Ohio who were married in a medical jet on a tarmac at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport earlier this month are now suing the governor and other officials of their home state in a bid to have their marriage recognized there. James Obergefell and John Arthur made the trip to Maryland on July 11 because same-sex marriage is not legal in Ohio. They did so in the special jet because Arthur suffers from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, and can only travel under special medical conditions.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
The small chartered medical jet landed at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport and taxied to a stop, and there on the tarmac, inside the jet, two men from Ohio were finally together in a state where they could wed. And that's exactly what they did. On Thursday morning, Jim Obergefell married his partner of more than 20 years, John Arthur, whose battle with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, has left him unable to travel except under special, medically-supported...
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2013
Captains Sharing & Caring, a nonprofit foundation that gives children with terminal illnesses or physical disabilities and their families a day out on several local waterways, is looking to marinas, yacht clubs and those with private docks to hosts events this summer. According to Cheryl Krajcsik, the executive director of the foundation, this is the third summer that the foundation will run events, mostly on Middle, North East and Magothy rivers and Bodkin Creek. The events typically last from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. on the water - with a picnic or other activities, such as swimming afterward - on Sundays from June through August.
NEWS
November 20, 2011
Never have I read a more poignant and thought provoking opinion piece than Ron Smith's last column for The Sun ("My work here is done," Nov. 18). It seems cut and dried that realism is the proper philosophy when someone elects not to continue cancer treatment. But what about this idea called hope, the desire accompanied by expectation? Some oncologist or someone else might eventually come to say: "Hey, your tests have shown you are getting better. We've got a new promising drug that works wonders.
HEALTH
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2011
The organizers of a hospice in downtown Baltimore are envisioning their new facility as a national model for the care of terminally sick infants and other children, a place of comfort for parents and extended families. While a crew hooked up electric cable and painters put the finishing touches on a cornice this week, the staff of Dr. Bob's Place look to the day in June when the first families and children arrive. "We will do everything we can to alleviate a sick child's three main worries — feeling the pain that often accompanies death, a fear of being alone and a concern about those they are leaving behind when they die," said Janet Will, a nurse who is director of the hospice for children.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Choi and Jennifer Choi,Sun reporter | April 3, 2008
No one would blame you if you couldn't see the overarching theme that binds the pieces of the Collective dance company's annual concert together. The Baltimore-based troupe explores the topic of transitions from wildly varying angles, including traffic and terminal illness. "I think that it's really a journey of a show," said director/choreographer Jessica Fultz. "Every piece is so different from the one before or after." The Collective: Moving Through Transitions, which takes place Saturday at the Baltimore Museum of Art, features eight pieces, including five world premieres.
NEWS
By Dolly Merritt and Dolly Merritt,Contributing Writer | February 23, 1993
A 75-year-old woman, whose husband had a terminal illness, wanted to care for him at home during his remaining time, but she was physically unable to provide the round-the-clock care he needed.She found a solution when the Hospice Services of Howard County provided an aide to administer 12 hours of daily medical care in the home, a volunteer to assist with errands, a clergyman who helped with spiritual concerns and funeral arrangements, and, ultimately, bereavement support services that helped the woman cope when her husband died.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Choi and Jennifer Choi,Sun reporter | April 3, 2008
No one would blame you if you couldn't see the overarching theme that binds the pieces of the Collective dance company's annual concert together. The Baltimore-based troupe explores the topic of transitions from wildly varying angles, including traffic and terminal illness. "I think that it's really a journey of a show," said director/choreographer Jessica Fultz. "Every piece is so different from the one before or after." The Collective: Moving Through Transitions, which takes place Saturday at the Baltimore Museum of Art, features eight pieces, including five world premieres.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,Sun reporter | January 15, 2008
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court yesterday upheld the government's authority to restrict access to experimental drugs, even if the drugs might help dying patients who have run out of other options. In a one-line decision, the court declined to hear the appeal of terminally ill patients who argued that they had a constitutional right to try unproven but promising treatments. "It's a tragedy," said Frank Burroughs, who has led the fight for expanded access since his 21-year-old daughter, Abigail, died while trying to get an experimental cancer treatment at Johns Hopkins Hospital in 2001.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 4, 2007
SOUTHFIELD, Mich. -- Jack Kevorkian, the former pathologist once known as "Doctor Death," says he will never again counsel a terminally ill person on how to die. But eight years behind bars and a strict list of promises to gain parole has done nothing to mellow the blunt, passionate, combative advocate for physician-assisted suicide. In an interview here yesterday, two days after his release from prison, Kevorkian, 79, let loose a rush of fierce words about a nation that failed to pass any new laws allowing assisted suicide while he was in prison.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.