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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
A Baltimore coal terminal operator has agreed to pay a $34,600 penalty and settle pollution violations alleged by the Environmental Protection Agency. Federal regulators contend that CNX Marine Terminals at 3800 Newgate Ave. near the northern entrance to the Harbor Tunnel was piping storm-water runoff illegally from its coal storage yard into a creek that feeds into the Patapsco River. The company also was accused of not adequately safeguarding its underground fuel storage tanks from leaks, and of improperly storing used fluorescent lamps.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
The American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland has filed a federal employment discrimination complaint against a Maryland hair salon on behalf of an employee who says he was fired for being HIV-positive. Representatives for Ratner Cos., which owns the Hair Cuttery in Greenbelt, said in a statement he was fired for "repeated inappropriate behavior," including verbally abusing co-workers in front of clients. A company document outlining his HIV status as the cause for his termination — which the ACLU included in the complaint to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission — "inaccurately described the reason for his dismissal," they said.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | September 17, 2013
A broad coalition of environmental and other groups urged Gov. Martin O'Malley Tuesday to oppose development of a natural gas export terminal on the Chesapeake Bay, calling it an unacceptable environmental and safety threat. Members of the coalition, which includes more than 120 local, statewide and national groups, gathered outside the Maryland Public Service Commission offices just before noon to outline their concerns over the proposed liquefied natural gas (LNG) export facility at Cove Point in Calvert County.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Matt Nickasch's home is anything but typical - he lives in the tower of a repurposed grain silo in Locust Point. His condo on the 18th floor is marked as a "bin" instead of a unit, a nod to industrial days long gone. "I've always been a fan of historic reuse," said the 27-year old technical consultant for the federal government. "From the historical artifacts of the 1920s structure to all of the modern conveniences and amenities, I feel that it provides the best of all worlds - old and new. " There was, indeed, a former life for Silo Point as a grain terminal for the B&O Railroad - once considered the fastest grain elevator in the world.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2002
A Baltimore-Washington International Airport employee was stabbed in the chest late Saturday at the light rail platform near the airport's international pier and then chased by three assailants into the terminal, Maryland Transportation Authority police said yesterday. The 20-year-old victim was treated at St. Agnes HealthCare and released early yesterday, said Cpl. Gregory Prioleau, a spokesman for the MdTA police. He would not release the man's identity, saying only that he was from eastern Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Nancy Knisley and Nancy Knisley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 15, 2005
This month marks a milestone in Baltimore-Washington International Airport's $1.8 billion expansion project, with the opening of the new terminal for Southwest Airlines. The bright and airy 350,000-square-foot A/B terminal, attached to the main terminal and connected by a new skywalk to the hourly parking garage, includes five gates, 62 ticketing positions, 11 security checkpoint lanes and five baggage carousels on the same level on which passengers will arrive. Jonathan Dean, director of communications for the Maryland Aviation Administration, said, "This will be one of the first terminals to open with a 9/11 mindset.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | December 6, 2008
Federal officials have determined that a proposed liquefied natural gas terminal at Sparrows Point in eastern Baltimore County would have "mostly limited adverse environmental impact" if constructed and operated with certain measures in place, according to a report released yesterday. The final environmental impact statement, by the staff of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, comes months after a preliminary report, which recommended conditional approval for the project proposed by the Virginia-based AES Corp.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2012
Work has begun on a $100 million upgrade of the oldest portion of BWI Marshall Airport to streamline security screening by allowing passengers to move among the three busiest concourses without having to pass through security a second time. Airport officials say widening Concourse C — in the 60-year-old central section of what was once Friendship International Airport — will allow them to expand the number of security lines from six to nine. It also will permit the replacement of magnetic-resonance screening machines with larger advanced imaging devices like the ones already used on concourses A and B. The project also will add a moving walkway on the airfield side of the terminal that will connect the 26 gates at concourses A and B used by Southwest Airlines and AirTran Airways with the 14 gates at Concourse C. In addition, Concourse C will be given the level of amenities found at the A and B concourses in approximately 8,500 square feet of new food and retail space.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | March 2, 1993
Columbia LNG Corp., the owner of the idle liquefied natural gas terminal at Cove Point in Calvert County, said yesterday that it has asked the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for permission to reactivate the facility.Columbia LNG, a subsidiary of Columbia Gas System Inc., plans to reopen the terminal, which has been dormant for nearly 13 years, in the fall of 1994 and to operate it as a storage and transportation facility for utilities and importers of liquefied natural gas."Columbia will not own any of the gas," said H. William Chaddock, senior vice president of Columbia Gas System Service Corp.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | August 18, 1992
Exxon Corp. and Chevron Corp. are considering closing their oil barge terminals in Salisbury on the Eastern Shore to increase efficiency.Such a move could put more oil tanker trucks on the road and present more of an environmental threat to the Eastern Shore, according to a water transport business group.Judy M. Carlson, administrator of Delmarva Water Transport Committee, said that for every barge that can carry 4,116 tons of oil, 147 28-ton tanker trucks would have to be used to carry in the oil. "You are actually compounding the environmental damage," she said.
NEWS
By Alexa Fraser | September 28, 2014
One of the things that delights me in the people I love is their differences.  Each of my beloved family members behaved differently in life, so naturally each of them chose to die in their own way.  My dad, Alex Fraser, wanted control over the time and place of his death.  As his Parkinson's worsened, sometime after his 90 t h birthday, he decided to take action.  His health had been declining for some time, his tremor made it hard...
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
The Men's Wearhouse plans to end the contract that supplies tuxedo rental inventory to Hampstead-based subsidiary Jos. A. Bank, the Houston-based men's retailer said Wednesday. Men's Wearhouse, which acquired Bank in June for $1.8 billion, said an early termination agreement between Bank and Illinois-based tuxedo wholesaler Jim's Formal Wear will take effect Dec. 31. The menswear chain will take a one-time charge of $4.5 million in its fiscal third quarter as a result. "As of January 1, 2015 we will be leveraging our internal tuxedo rental inventory and logistics to serve the Jos. A. Bank tuxedo operations," Men's Wearhouse president and CEO Doug Ewert said in the announcement.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
When a high-ranking O'Malley administration official was fired after allegedly steering about $774,000 in federal grant money to a company to which the official had close ties, no announcement was made. Only this week was the dismissal two years ago made public by legislative auditors. Auditors revealed that an inspector general had completed a report in 2013 that found misuse of government funds and a "serious conflict of interest" on the part of the top official of the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation's Division of Workforce Development.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Visitors, employees and neighbors of BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport now have a new option for enjoying the 12.5-mile trail that loops around the airport's Anne Arundel County property. The Boston-based bikeshare company Zagster, working with BWI, has installed a dock for 10 of its bicycles outside the airport's international terminal, near the light rail station. They are available for rental for $5 a day. Long-term passes for regular use cost $15 a month or $50 a year. Officials envision the bikes being used by airport travelers with time to kill and an urge to get outside, employees looking for a bit of exercise on a break or after work, and neighbors looking to take better advantage of the trail.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Hearings began Monday on claims by BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport's former acting fire chief that he was unfairly terminated earlier this year after raising concerns about racial bias within the department. Gregory Lawrence, who is black, said he believes the Maryland Aviation Administration terminated him in March without due process after he raised concerns about an all-white recruit class. He said he feels the decision also was in retaliation for a previous discrimination case he brought against the department more than a decade ago. "I want to go back to work," Lawrence said Monday morning, prior to the start of several days of hearings scheduled in the case at the Maryland Office of Administrative Hearings in Hunt Valley.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Ernest L. Caldwell Jr., a retired senior city planner and urban designer who did early studies for what became Oriole Park at Camden Yards , died of complications of Parkinson's disease July 8 at Keswick Multi-Care Center. The Stoneleigh resident was 74. Colleagues said Mr. Caldwell, a longtime baseball fan, had an early and influential role in convincing city officials of the potential of the former Baltimore & Ohio Railroad property adjacent to Camden Station as the site of a new sports field.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | January 12, 1995
With the city of Baltimore promising to provide as much as $8.8 million in road and utility work, the state approved a plan yesterday to purchase a site adjacent to the old AlliedSignal Inc. chrome works plant for a passenger cruise ship terminal.The state Board of Public Works approved an agreement to buy a 3.1-acre parcel for $3 million before August 1997, provided financing can be secured for the terminal's construction. The project is expected to cost between $40 million and $50 million, including the value of the city's infrastructure work, according to the Maryland Port Administration (MPA)
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | January 14, 2009
The Army Corps of Engineers said it will not issue a permit for a proposed liquefied natural gas terminal at Sparrows Point and a pipeline through Maryland to Pennsylvania until the project's developer has complied with federal wildlife regulations, prepared mitigation plans for wetlands that might be disturbed during construction and met other requests for information. The Corps is the second agency this month to question plans by Virginia-based AES Corp. to build the terminal and lay 88 miles of pipe to transport the gas. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service asked the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to delay its vote on the project, scheduled for tomorrow, until concerns about habitats for the bog turtle and Indiana bat can be addressed.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
State officials approved the sale of a 346,000-square-foot pier in Canton to Rukert Terminals Corp., a private terminal operator with an established footprint in Baltimore shipping. The Clinton Street Marine Terminal, as "Pier 1" and its surrounding half-acre of property are known, was deemed surplus to the needs of the Maryland Port Administration earlier this year. The pier hasn't actively handled cargo since the 1980s, but remains in use to berth ships. The $2 million sale frees the port administration from maintenance costs at the rundown facility while keeping the valuable waterfront property tied to maritime industry, even as commercial "gentrification" in nearby Canton neighborhoods creeps ever closer, said Mike Miller, director of maritime commercial management for the port administration.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
Parked drivers waiting at BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport for calls from just-landed loved ones will have to do so from a new location starting April 1. The airport's so-called "cell phone lot" will move from one side of Terminal Road to the other, adjacent to the airport's daily parking garage, officials said Thursday. The move will double the number of parking spots in the free waiting area from 50 to 100. It will also add additional spaces to the airport's "express" parking lot, which offers luggage assistance and "carside-to-curbside" shuttle services.
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