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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 15, 1999
Who would have thought that Steven Soderbergh, whose debut film "Sex, Lies and Videotape" virtually crowned him king of the independents, would find his niche directing smart little crime thrillers? Hard on the heels of last year's "Out of Sight" comes "The Limey," in which audiences once again find themselves rooting for the bad guy, if only because the other guys are so much worse.Made with the director's characteristic flair and intelligence, "The Limey" is a relatively quiet contender in a movie season of ever-increasing violence and visual gimmicks (see "Three Kings" and "Fight Club")
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NEWS
January 9, 2009
Marley & Me *** ( 3 STARS) $24.3 million $106.7 million 2 weeks Rated: PG Running time: 120 minutes What it's about: Based on the autobiographical book by newspaper columnist John Grogan, Marley & Me is about a newly married couple (including Jennifer Aniston, above) who adopt a puppy. Our take: If you have experienced the redemptive joy of coming home from a hard day at work, only to be greeted by a dog who just knows you're the best thing in the world, then this is the movie you've been waiting for. Bedtime Stories * ( 1 STAR)
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September 27, 2002
Starring Yvan Attal, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Terence Stamp Directed by Yvan Attal Released by Sony Picture Classics Rated R (language, nudity/sexuality) Time 95 minutes
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | December 19, 2008
Should you see Yes Man? Well, maybe. Let's be clear: If ever a movie mistook a premise for a plot, it's this one. Some films suffer from a surfeit of one-liners. This picture evaporates midway through because the story itself is a one-liner. Yet it also has a cast that gets into the silliness. This film's lead actors can turn odd curves into dynamite goofballs. It's all about the grooviness that descends on a negative guy, Carl Allen (Jim Carrey), a bank loan officer in Los Angeles, when he makes a covenant with self-help guru Terrence Bundley (Terence Stamp)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | September 16, 1994
Someone had a very good idea for a story in "The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert." Unfortunately, they filmed the idea and not the story.That's why the film, which seems deeply amusing for quite a time, peters out as it reiterates its basic idea over and over and . . . over.The idea: gaudy, theatrical drag queens on a cross-country bus trip through a rude, backward rural desert, a Sahara of the Bozarts. If you're thinking of benighted spots in our own great republic, think again: The setting is the vast, primitive Australian outback.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | December 19, 2008
Should you see Yes Man? Well, maybe. Let's be clear: If ever a movie mistook a premise for a plot, it's this one. Some films suffer from a surfeit of one-liners. This picture evaporates midway through because the story itself is a one-liner. Yet it also has a cast that gets into the silliness. This film's lead actors can turn odd curves into dynamite goofballs. It's all about the grooviness that descends on a negative guy, Carl Allen (Jim Carrey), a bank loan officer in Los Angeles, when he makes a covenant with self-help guru Terrence Bundley (Terence Stamp)
NEWS
December 26, 2008
Yes Man ** ( 2 STARS) $18.3 million $18.3 million 1 week Rated: PG-13 Running time: 104 minutes What it's about: All the grooviness that descends on a negative guy (Jim Carrey, above) when he makes a covenant with a self-help guru (Terence Stamp) to say "Yes!" to everything in life. Our take: Most of the good vibrations come from Zooey Deschanel, who plays a free-spirited club singer; she's the rare performer who can bring verve and body to eccentricity. Seven Pounds * ( 1 STAR)
NEWS
April 26, 1998
Mel Powell,75, a Pulitzer Prize-winning composer who worked as a pianist and arranger with the Benny Goodman Orchestra, died of liver cancer Friday in Los Angeles. He began his career as a pianist and arranger with the Benny Goodman Orchestra and the Glenn Miller Army Air Force Band. He won a Pulitzer in 1990 for "Duplicates: A Concerto for Two Pianos and Orchestra."Elizabeth "Libbie" Creger,30, credited with writing fair housing laws and working to improve race relations as human rights director of Dubuque, Iowa, died Wednesday of complications from childbirth after the delivery of a daughter two months premature.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 26, 2003
It should be easy to dismiss the idea of movies based on amusement-park rides as creative bankruptcy of the most pallid sort; how could this possibly be good? But then Disney confounded such conventional wisdom with last summer's Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl, a movie that wholeheartedly embraced its cliches even while breathing new life into them. The Haunted Mansion is a return to form - bad form. Lifeless, unimaginative and almost determinedly uninspired, it's paint-by-numbers filmmaking at its dreariest.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | November 22, 2008
Of all the Superman films to date, 1980's Superman II (10 p.m. on TV Land, repeats at 12:30 a.m.) stands out as the best. It's got a strong, charismatic performance from Christopher Reeve (who never got his due as an actor in this role). It's got wonderful villains in both Gene Hackman's Lex Luthor (who was so good that Kevin Spacey was left with nothing to do but imitate him in 2006's Superman Returns) and Terence Stamp's General Zod. It's got a touching storyline (Superman reveals his secret identity to Lois)
FEATURES
September 27, 2002
Starring Yvan Attal, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Terence Stamp Directed by Yvan Attal Released by Sony Picture Classics Rated R (language, nudity/sexuality) Time 95 minutes
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | October 15, 1999
Who would have thought that Steven Soderbergh, whose debut film "Sex, Lies and Videotape" virtually crowned him king of the independents, would find his niche directing smart little crime thrillers? Hard on the heels of last year's "Out of Sight" comes "The Limey," in which audiences once again find themselves rooting for the bad guy, if only because the other guys are so much worse.Made with the director's characteristic flair and intelligence, "The Limey" is a relatively quiet contender in a movie season of ever-increasing violence and visual gimmicks (see "Three Kings" and "Fight Club")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | September 16, 1994
Someone had a very good idea for a story in "The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert." Unfortunately, they filmed the idea and not the story.That's why the film, which seems deeply amusing for quite a time, peters out as it reiterates its basic idea over and over and . . . over.The idea: gaudy, theatrical drag queens on a cross-country bus trip through a rude, backward rural desert, a Sahara of the Bozarts. If you're thinking of benighted spots in our own great republic, think again: The setting is the vast, primitive Australian outback.
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