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EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | August 8, 2012
Tequila is a colorless, sometimes straw-colored liquor made by fermenting, then distilling, the sweet sap of the agave plant (a durable, long-lived cactus, also known as the century plant). It originated in Tequila, Mexico. Hence the name. While distilleries start with a sweet agave sap, the end result is rather more spicy and sharp-tasting than sweet. Most of the tequilas we buy for our at-home purposes are 80 to 96 proof (meaning they contain 40 to 48 percent alcohol). Some, which are prized by tequila aficionados and poured in tequila bars, such as Azul 17 in Columbia, are considerably more spirited than that.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | April 8, 2014
I'm not sure whether the weather makes me want to drink in celebration of the new season or in escape from the old. Either way: It. Is. Spring, y'all. Ah, it's the return of outdoor seating, of live music, a nice breeze off the water, and light, airy sips of cooling cocktails. The only problem is that everyone's got the same plan. Take this past weekend, for example: People were practically falling out of the windows or off bar balconies soaking in every ounce of summer sunshine and beverages that they could.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case | October 17, 2012
On a recent Saturday night at Banditos, the taco and tequila bar located in the heart of Federal Hill's party scene, inconsistent service overshadowed the Tex-Mex spot's laid-back vibe. While some details were easy to enjoy (portions of the decor, music selection and, most importantly, the drinks), the overall experience was not. The central problem seemed to be the underprepared (or undermanned) bar staff, which grew noticeably frustrated by the steady - but not overwhelming - weekend rush.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple and For b | January 21, 2014
I'm done with Winter. Cold snaps, arctic this and freezing that. I need something to remind me of warmer times and only a Margarita will do. Tart, sweet, tequila ... bring me to that place so I don't have to pay attention to the fact that I'm wearing three layers of underwear to keep me from freezing. Blue Agave, it's your time to shine. And shine it does with the decidedly unseasonable Raspberry Margarita. Made with a base of house-made sour mix, which is heavier on the sour than the sweet, this cocktail brings just the right combination of everything required to make a Marg great - with the added bonus of pineapple- and vanilla-bean-infused Espolon Blanco tequila and big chunks of muddled raspberry.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | January 25, 2006
One of Locust Point's newest bars has just added food to the mix. Lime, which opened on Fort Avenue in November, is a dream come true for owners Scott Cerniglia and Brendon Smith. A very green dream. Cerniglia says they took an old "hole-in-the-wall" package goods/bar and turned it into a tequila bar "with a hip, trendy feel." The whole place is painted two shades of lime, floor to ceiling. Then, there are the black accents on the bar, barstools and chairs. And a high-gloss epoxy bar top and tables.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 7, 2002
When the Blue Agave opened in Federal Hill, the tequila-themed restaurant put up a margarita sign, keeping count of the number it sold. Two years later, the count has gone well past 76,000. For every mixed drink the restaurant serves, Blue Agave bartenders mix 50 to 60 margaritas, says chef-owner Michael Marx. Marx is such a tequila fan that he offers patrons a choice of 87 different tequilas and named his restaurant after the plant from which it's produced. Tequila comes from the blue agave, one of many varieties of agave plants that grow in Mexico.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Murphy-Larronde and Suzanne Murphy-Larronde,Contributing Writer | December 26, 1993
Sometime during the 1960s, so the story goes, the Mexican government launched a campaign to promote its fabulous array of regional foods and beverages. Out of the cook-offs and contests surrounding the hoopla came a tasty concoction called the margarita -- and with it respectability and an international audience for the drink's main ingredient, tequila.Until that time, Mexico's favorite firewater was known and appreciated largely within its own borders, where it was once sold under-the-counter in hardware stores.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 5, 2004
It's Cinco de Mayo, a day to celebrate Mexican history and heritage. In the world of spirits, Mexico's great contribution has been tequila, the indispensable ingredient in this country's favorite cocktail, the margarita. Margaritas need no explanation here. Most Americans who have ever parked themselves on a bar stool and ordered a drink have experienced the pleasures of that seductively lip-puckering concoction. We have been slower to appreciate tequila as a spirit worth savoring without the leavening benefits of lime juice, liqueur and a salted glass rim. But as American tastes have become more sophisticated, the market for high-end tequilas has seen an increase like that for other premium spirits.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | May 4, 2006
From the patrons to the paint job, Lime is one of the city's most colorful corner bars. Fort Avenue's funky new tequila joint combines South Baltimore natives, yuppies and devilish Mexican drinks in an atmosphere all its own. It's a narrow, quirky neighborhood bar worth driving to - especially for tomorrow's free outdoor Cinco de Mayo extravaganza. But, as with most tequila bars, an average evening at Lime can get pretty pricey, which is the main reason why I don't drink there more often.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | June 2, 2002
NEW YORK -- The first ingredient Pilar Montero scooped into the clear bowl of warm water was three heaping spoonfuls of milk powder. Then came four scoops of cocoa powder, a dash of cinnamon oil, a few Hershey kisses and a handful of baby marshmallows. As Montero stirred up the frothy mix, a mouthwatering aroma began to fill the air. But instead of lifting the bowl to her lips, Montero gently took the hands of the woman sitting across from her and immersed them in the decadent concoction.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
First of all, mezcal is not tequila. Tequila can only be made from the blue agave plant, while mezcal can be made from a whole bunch of different kind of agaves. But it's mezcal's production method, primarily the use of an underground baking process, that imparts its distinctive smoky flavor. You can find out a whole lot more about mezcal at Birroteca tonight, when Ilegal Mezcal founder Stephen Myers will be behind the bar, mixing cocktails and telling customers about mezcal's unique production techniques.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case | October 17, 2012
On a recent Saturday night at Banditos, the taco and tequila bar located in the heart of Federal Hill's party scene, inconsistent service overshadowed the Tex-Mex spot's laid-back vibe. While some details were easy to enjoy (portions of the decor, music selection and, most importantly, the drinks), the overall experience was not. The central problem seemed to be the underprepared (or undermanned) bar staff, which grew noticeably frustrated by the steady - but not overwhelming - weekend rush.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | August 8, 2012
Tequila is a colorless, sometimes straw-colored liquor made by fermenting, then distilling, the sweet sap of the agave plant (a durable, long-lived cactus, also known as the century plant). It originated in Tequila, Mexico. Hence the name. While distilleries start with a sweet agave sap, the end result is rather more spicy and sharp-tasting than sweet. Most of the tequilas we buy for our at-home purposes are 80 to 96 proof (meaning they contain 40 to 48 percent alcohol). Some, which are prized by tequila aficionados and poured in tequila bars, such as Azul 17 in Columbia, are considerably more spirited than that.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | June 6, 2012
Power Plant Live newcomer Kettle Hill, a "Theodore Roosevelt-themed" establishment replete with lively, wood-and-iron-and-brass layouts, is a solid rustic-yet-fun place to hang out after work. It's a spot for working professionals with a bit of grown-up taste. Like the atmosphere, the cocktail menu, as bartender Daniel Clemmer puts it aptly, "is sophisticated, but approachable without being pretentious. " One of the freshest examples is the Church and State, a Herradura Tequila-based cocktail with fresh-squeezed lemon juice, fresh pineapple juice, cinnamon simple syrup and honkin' 2-by-2 inch ice cubes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Anne Marie Turner | December 15, 2011
It's a pretty well known fact that I want to go out drinking with the “Top Chef” contestants. Whenever the cheftestants are in the stew room or come back tired and beat from an elimination challenge, I want to jump through my TV and pound some pinot with them. So when this week's show opened with them drinking in their hotel room, I had a very good feeling about this episode. Quickfire Challenge Chef Tim “Tough” Love is the special guest at this week's Quickfire Challenge.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | August 2, 2011
There's more to summer cocktails than mojitos or margaritas; sure they get the job done, but they aren't nearly as refreshing as Mr. Rain's sinfully made Eve's Habit. The Funhouse, a culinary wonderland atop the American Visionary Art Museum , loves to serve patrons drinks as innovative and quirky as their artistic digs. I loved Eve's Habit, served as part of a flight of handcrafted cocktails called The Garden Variety. As the title suggests, ingredients are inspired by fresh, seasonal produce: red bell pepper-infused gin, fresh citruses and herbs, organic rum infused with hibiscus, ginger and cardamom.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 6, 2003
GRAAFF-REINET, South Africa - It's the fiery alcohol that may bring to mind drunken college nights, salt-covered hands and some oh, so terrible mornings-after, but tequila, above all else, is Mexico's national drink. The spirit is as much part of the Mexican landscape as the sun, a source of pride that is so tightly controlled under law that no one outside one small part of Mexico is allowed to produce it. But thousands of miles from Mexico, a tiny distillery in a lonely valley of South Africa hopes to bring an end to Mexico's monopoly over the multibillion-dollar tequila market.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple and For b | January 21, 2014
I'm done with Winter. Cold snaps, arctic this and freezing that. I need something to remind me of warmer times and only a Margarita will do. Tart, sweet, tequila ... bring me to that place so I don't have to pay attention to the fact that I'm wearing three layers of underwear to keep me from freezing. Blue Agave, it's your time to shine. And shine it does with the decidedly unseasonable Raspberry Margarita. Made with a base of house-made sour mix, which is heavier on the sour than the sweet, this cocktail brings just the right combination of everything required to make a Marg great - with the added bonus of pineapple- and vanilla-bean-infused Espolon Blanco tequila and big chunks of muddled raspberry.
NEWS
November 23, 2010
I found your editorial "Forbidding 'Four Loko'" (Nov. 22) to be illogical, one-sided and utterly missing the point. I am a 19-year-old college student and therefore surely biased toward the glorious nectar that is Four Loko, and I can assure you that you cannot tax yourself out of this. If anything, making alcohol cheaper will solve your problems. I think the best alcohol education I ever received was last fall when I found myself vomiting behind a dumpster outside of a London bar. I woke up the next morning, and the next eight hours of recovery was all the convincing I needed that tequila was the devil.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large | elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | November 8, 2009
Howard County has other places where you can get Mexican food, but a $100 margarita? I don't think so. Azul 17, Columbia's new Mexican restaurant and tequila lounge, offers more than 100 tequilas and 17 signature margaritas. It doesn't give those margaritas away, but none of them costs over $17. However, those who are feeling flush can order one of two other margaritas, which are assembled tableside: the Ultimate Margarita made with Tequila Patron Platinum for $40 or the Rockefeller Margarita made with Tequila Don Julio Real for $100.
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