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NEWS
December 26, 2009
In response to the Sun's editorial "Not No. 1 in reform" (Dec. 22), why not make the National Board Certification for teachers the litmus for teacher tenure in Maryland? Teachers cannot sit for the National Board Certification until they have completed three full years of teaching in the same school district and must submit a portfolio, which should include video recordings, examples of student work and documentation of accomplishments outside the classroom that impact student learning.
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NEWS
August 28, 2014
The Sun's recent editorial ( "Time to talk teacher tenure," Aug. 23) is a colorful piece, full of red herrings and false premises. But let's get at least one thing straight: tenure should not and does not mean "guaranteed employment. " It simply means that an educator has the right to a fair hearing and investigation rather than being summarily fired because of an ultimately false accusation, because they chose to speak out on behalf of their students or because someone disagrees with a teacher's decision to teach, say, evolution.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie | liz.bowie@baltsun.com | February 21, 2010
A proposal to make Maryland's teachers wait longer before receiving job protection - a change that officials say might help the state gain federal funding - is sparking a debate over how to elevate the quality of the teaching profession. Some educators say that tenure should be reserved only for those teachers a school system is willing to invest in for decades and that new teachers should be given far more training and mentoring. The legislation to change teacher tenure was introduced last week by Gov. Martin O'Malley after being proposed by schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick, who believes it will help the state's chances of getting federal Race to the Top funding.
NEWS
August 23, 2014
Across the nation, the topic of teacher tenure has gotten much attention of late and not only because students are returning to school. In Republican controlled states, there have been numerous efforts to limit such employment guarantees, and even in Democratic-leaning states like Maryland there has been interest in reform in order to boost school performance. The question is, does granting job security to public school teachers help or hurt the quality of education? Does it help attract the best and brightest to the profession or does it give cover to bad teachers?
NEWS
May 5, 2010
In response to state Sen. Paul Pinsky's opinion piece ("A flawed '50% formula,'" May 4). I agree with his concern for an honest discussion about fairly evaluating Maryland teachers' performance. However, the telling point in his piece was about the tenure threshold being raised from two to three years. In a high stakes performance based career such as teaching I see absolutely no rationale for "tenure" being given. Period. As a parent in Montgomery County I've seen the difficulty of principals' being unable to fire or demote longstanding low performing teachers.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
As Henry Mouzon Sr. conjures memories of his tenure aboard the aircraft carrier USS Intrepid during World War II, he serves notice that, at age 87, his mind is still as sturdy as the 41,000-ton ship that carried him to the shores of East Asia and brought him home again. "I saw many ships sink, destroyers and battleships, and we sank many of them," said the Jessup resident, who is to be honored for his service aboard the carrier next month by the Columbia-based Howard County Center of African American Culture.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | liz.bowie@baltsun.com | March 26, 2010
Some education leaders and advocates say they are concerned a proposal that would change the tenure law for teachers in Maryland might backfire and make it more difficult to get rid of ineffective teachers early in their careers. Baltimore schools CEO Andrés Alonso said this week that he is worried that "a bill that was intended to make tenure more meaningful is actually making tenure meaningless." The proposal would extend from two years to three the time Maryland teachers must put in before receiving tenure and is part of a larger education reform act introduced by Gov. Martin O'Malley.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2013
When Johannes Brahms set about composing a requiem to commemorate his mother, he aimed for something that was more about comforting than crying, more about coming to terms than fretting about whatever judgment might await the dead. The result, "Ein Deutsches Requiem" ("A German Requiem"), is one of the glories of the choral repertoire, one of Brahms' most personal and affecting pieces. Melinda O'Neal, in her final concert as artistic director of the Handel Choir of Baltimore, conducted an impressive performance of the Requiem Sunday afternoon that communicated its bittersweet lyricism and the ingenious cohesion of its architectural shape.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2011
Placido Domingo, as usual, is in full multitask mode as he wraps up his 15-year tenure as general director of Washington National Opera. The famed Spanish tenor has seven more performances to sing as Oreste in the company's first-ever production of Gluck's "Iphigenie en Tauride," which opened last Friday. He'll also switch gears to conduct five performances of Donizetti's "Don Pasquale," which opens this Friday. At 70, Domingo could be pursuing an enviable, pampered life of leisure, but that's a thoroughly alien concept to him. Besides, he gives every indication of thriving on packed schedules like the one he has this month in Washington.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 12, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Ariel Sharon's outsized brown leather chair sat empty at his Cabinet's table for the last time yesterday as government ministers formally ended the stricken Israeli leader's tenure as prime minister. By a unanimous vote, the Cabinet declared Sharon, who has been in a coma since suffering a devastating stroke Jan. 4, to be permanently incapacitated. The vote was a formality, spurred by legal necessity. Sharon's deputy, Ehud Olmert, assumed the duties of office the night the 78-year-old leader suffered a massive hemorrhagic stroke.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
The timing of Bud Selig's pre-retirement news conference at Camden Yards Tuesday was delicious. It was 20 years to the day after major league players walked out and initiated the most disastrous labor showdown in baseball history. The great work stoppage of 1994-95 turned the fans against both the players and owners, and the owner with the biggest target on his back was the acting commissioner, who would eventually become the permanent commissioner and run Major League Baseball for a total of 22 years.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
The former president of ESPN has joined Under Armour's board of directors, the Baltimore-based sports apparel company said Tuesday. George W. Bodenheimer served as ESPN's longest tenured president from 1998 to 2012, leading the sports network to unprecedented global growth, Under Armour said in an announcement. He also served as co-chairman of Disney Media Networks, president of ABC Sports and most recently as executive chairman of ESPN before retiring from the company in May. "His pioneering vision and his experience building and leading a global sports media brand will bring important perspective and expertise to our company as we continue to expand the UA brand globally," Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank said in the announcement.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
On the eve of ending his tenure on the Howard County school board, Brian Meshkin recounted what he considers accomplishments and challenges while on the panel — offering glimpses into a system regarded among the best in the state but that he said is often hindered by personality clashes. He said he relished being part of the school board's efforts to implement cost-saving measures during the recession while upgrading its digital technology; yet he bemoaned a board atmosphere he described as acrimonious and dysfunctional, and included himself in his assessment of a panel that he says is made up of "good people" who don't always work well together.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Delaware's Bob Shillinglaw recently became the first coach in men's college lacrosse to coach 600 career games. The Severna Park native and graduate may not have envisioned such longevity, but he always knew he would be a coach. “I was very, very fortunate,” he said on Wednesday morning. “Very early through high school and college, I made the decision that I wanted to be a coach. Going through my collegiate career, I decided that I really wanted to get into it, the college aspect of it. Right out of North Carolina, I was able to get in as a one-year assistant [at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy]
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
GREENSBORO, N.C. -- Slumped against a wall across from his team's dressing room at the Greensboro Coliseum, Maryland men's basketball coach Mark Turgeon couldn't get Florida State center Boris Bojanovsky's dunk out of his head. The play, with less than a second left in Thursday's second-round Atlantic Coast Conference tournament game, not only gave the Seminoles a 67-65 victory, but it also ended the Terps' 61-year association with the league here on Tobacco Road. Turgeon said his team was well aware that this was its last chance at the ACC tournament, but he said the Terps had more emotion about playing less than two days after the death of former team manager Zach Lederer, who passed away at 20 after a lengthy battle with brain cancer.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
The head of security at the Baltimore City Detention Center has resigned, officials said Tuesday, a move that again leaves an important leadership job at the troubled facility vacant. Eric C. Brown started at the jail in September to help clean up after a scathing federal indictment last spring. Prosecutors alleged that female corrections officers had been having sex with jailed gang members and helping them smuggle contraband into the detention center. The job had been open for months after his predecessor's ouster.
BUSINESS
By CHARLES JAFFE | May 27, 2001
IN SELECTING a mutual fund, investors have been known to look at almost everything, from past performance and star ratings to cost structure, tax-efficiency to turnover, quality of the parent company to background of the manager. That last category, the one where investors gauge the manager, may be the most subjective. Judging a manager may come down to an impression gleaned from a television interview or a snippet from a magazine article or a fund's promotional brochure. But a recent study completed by Morningstar.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1996
A state appeals court reversed yesterday an $822,000 judgment awarded by a Baltimore Circuit Court jury to two professors who sued after they were fired by Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1994.The Court of Special Appeals ruled that Drs. Samuel B. Ritter and A. Rebecca Snider were never offered tenure when they were recruited in 1993 and were owed no explanations when they were fired.Dr. Frank Oski, the hospital's director of pediatrics, clearly was in no position to offer tenure when he recruited Ritter from Cornell and Snider from Duke University, the court ruled.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
Fundraising events can make for strange bedfellows, particularly when it comes to politics. But more than a few heads were turned, eyebrows were raised and stomachs were -- well, you get the picture -- when it was announced that former longtime rivals and now retired college basketball coaches Gary Williams and Jim Calhoun would be part of the same "Lunch with Legends" in New York City. In town for a game Friday night between their two former teams at the Barclays Center in Brooklyn, N.Y., Williams and Calhoun broke only bread during a luncheon hosted by the Terrapin Club. Williams and Calhoun seem to have buried the proverbial hatchet in their well-publicized feud that flared up nearly a decade ago when the Terps and Huskies were both recruiting former Archbishop Spalding star Rudy Gay, who eventually chose Connecticut.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
While Brian Roberts could be playing his final games in an Orioles uniform this weekend, the veteran second baseman has made it clear that he wants to remain with the team in 2014. And as the season nears a close, Roberts is building a solid case to consider. Roberts hit his third homer in his past five games Saturday, a solo blast to left field off Boston Red Sox left-hander Jon Lester that led off the third inning and gave the Orioles a 2-0 lead. Over his past 41 games, dating to Aug. 12, Roberts has a .265/.341/.429 slash line with six homers, 22 RBIs and 20 runs scored.
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