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NEWS
December 15, 2009
- The atmosphere at the U.N. climate conference grew more tense after talks were suspended for most of Monday's session - a sign of the developing nations' deep distrust of the promises by industrial countries to cut greenhouse gas emissions. The Africa-led suspension went to the core of suspicions by poor countries that wealthier ones were trying to soften their commitments and evade penalties for missing their targets. Talks were halted most of the day, resuming only after conference president Connie Hedegaard of Denmark assured developing countries she was not trying to kill the Kyoto Protocol, the 1997 document that requires industrial nations to cut emissions and imposes penalties if they fail to do so. Kyoto makes no demands on developing countries.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
All across the globe, worried Metropolitan Opera fans, not to mention assorted pundits and politicians, are caught up in the suspense of the company's testy contract negotiations with its many unions. Last night's late-hour reprieve -- management agreed to extend talks for 72-hours, rather than impose a lockout at midnight -- has only revved up the anxiety even more. To provide an appropriate soundtrack for these tense times, I offer one of the greatest examples of musical tension in all of opera, Siegmund's extended cry of "Walse!"
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NEWS
By Carol Eisenberg and Carol Eisenberg,NEWSDAY | November 16, 2007
WASHINGTON -- How serious is it that undercover teams were able to smuggle bomb components, including liquid explosives, past passenger checkpoints in all 19 airports they tested this year? So serious, in the view of investigators, that they made a video showing in slow-motion detail how they blew up several cars with bombs made from the commercially available materials, purchased for under $150 in local stores or on the Internet. "Our tests clearly demonstrate that a terrorist group, using publicly available information and few resources, could cause severe damage to an airplane ... by bringing prohibited improvised explosive device components through security checkpoints," said Gregory D. Kutz, a managing director for the Government Accountability Office.
NEWS
January 16, 2012
News that the U.S. has resumed drone strikes in Pakistan, killing at least three suspected militants last week in the tribal areas of North Waziristan along that country's border with Afghanistan, could hardly come at a more delicate moment for U.S.-Pakistani relations. Rather than signal an improvement in ties between the two uneasy allies in the war against Islamic insurgents, it may end up pushing the two sides even further apart - or, in the worst case, precipitating a rupture.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | December 20, 1998
It was another mind-blowing, surreal day of history and histrionics on our television screens as we watched a drama yesterday never before seen on American TV: the impeachment of a president.But, for all of the medium's marvelous ability to take us in a heartbeat from Baghdad to Capitol Hill and the White House as incredible events unfolded this week, there was a major part of the story yesterday that television was not able to show us.We saw the stunning resignation statement by Speaker-presumptive Robert L. Livingston and got some idea of its impact on other members from the emotional words of Richard A. Gephardt, the House minority leader, and Tom DeLay, majority whip.
NEWS
By Connie Ogle and Connie Ogle,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | July 14, 1996
"A Little Yellow Dog," by Walter Mosley. Norton. 288 pages. $23.Easy Rawlins is a black man in the tense years leading up to the civil rights movement. That alone is enough to earn him the constant attention of police. Plus, he's always "doing favors" for folks in sticky situations, which usually wind up with someone trying to kill him.The author's latest book is murder, intrigue, sex, a fine historical perspective and a dash of wisdom.Pub Date: 7/14/96
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | May 19, 1994
Horse racing has a language of its own. It's part of the sport's charm.To talk like a true race tracker, it's not enough just to know the terminology. You have to know how to speak ungrammatically, especially when it comes to tense.Everything that has ever occurred at a race track is expressed in the present tense, even if it happened a half century ago.For instance, the words ran and won -- perfectly good English verbs -- don't exist at the track. They're past tense.To illustrate, take the colt Pensive, who won the Kentucky Derby and Preakness a half century ago. Horsemen don't say he won those Triple Crown races in 1994.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | November 5, 2007
I don't know how things are in your house, but it might get a little tense around the TV tonight. And when I say a "little" tense, I mean the way the Gaza Strip gets a little tense. Here's the problem: at 8:30, you have the Ravens-Steelers on Monday Night Football, which is the biggest game since the dawn of civilization, to hear some people tell it. At the same time, on another channel, you have Dancing With the Stars, which is a huge hit this season and has much of America inexplicably riveted by the sight of Jane Seymour doing the foxtrot (when she's not coming down with food poisoning)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 7, 2005
Husaybah, Iraq -- A Marine was killed in an insurgent ambush yesterday when his patrol raided a house in this tense border town, the first American casualty in a Marine-led sweep through the area aimed at stopping foreign jihadists from infiltrating Iraq through the Syrian border. A group of Marines began to search the house, which appeared to be empty, and were met with a hail of gunfire, which killed one Marine and drove the others outside. The insurgent gunman was killed by other Marines as he tried to flee from the roof.
FEATURES
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,SUN STAFF | July 27, 1996
What a difference 26 years makes. In 1970, Commander Jim Lovell lived through one of the most dramatic events in space history when an explosion rocked the moon-bound Apollo 13. The three-man crew's harrowing trip home was a triumph of human ingenuity and teamwork, made famous again last summer when Tom Hanks played Lovell in the movie "Apollo 13."There was far less heart-stopping suspense this week when Lovell came to Baltimore to promote public interest in space. Just compare the film version of his life to Lovell's decidedly down-to-earth marathon press tour.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2012
With the Ravens clinging to a precarious four-point lead and the Cincinnati Bengals crossing midfield midway through the fourth quarter, the team needed a big play from the defense. It was no surprise to cornerback Cary Williams that outside linebacker Terrell Suggs provided. Suggs stripped Jermaine Gresham of the football after the tight end had made a short reception, and strong safety Bernard Pollard recovered the fumble at the Ravens' 40-yard line. Three plays later, running back Ray Rice scampered 51 yards for a touchdown and a more comfortable 11-point advantage.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2011
The vigil began on an ominous note. The organizers had asked police to be there so they could mourn without looking over their shoulders, but the squad car pulled away, lights and sirens, to respond to another call. Relatives and friends of Marquis Jones pushed down the dark East Baltimore alley anyway, holding Mylar balloons and candles, and shaking off a steady rain that plopped through the canopy of trees above. They gathered one night last week at the spot where the 19-year-old was recently gunned down.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 14, 2011
Cheer up. Not everything went down over the last two weeks. Granted, most things did. The stock market tanked, government's approval numbers fell, America's credit rating slipped as if on a cosmic banana peel. All of which is predictable any time the world's largest economy is driven to the rim of ruin while "leaders" bicker like kids in the back seat of the family car on a road trip across Texas. In August. With a busted air conditioner. But in the midst of that bleak litany of decline, there was a bright spot.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2011
Brian Matusz looked visibly shaken, pausing several times to collect his thoughts before delivering what was painfully obvious on this night. "I just didn't have it today," Matusz said after lasting just 1 1/3 innings and allowing four earned runs, five hits and three walks in the Orioles' 5-2 loss to the Minnesota Twins tonight at sold-out Hammond Stadium. "You're never happy with an early exit like that. I'm not happy, and a little frustrated. I'm upset at myself, but at the same time, it's nice to get this out [of the way]
NEWS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2011
Maryland's search for a new football coach was broader and more suspenseful than most fans knew, according to interviews and documents that show the school spent more than $40,000 in travel and had three finalists in play on the day before Randy Edsall was hired Jan. 2. Maryland was aided by Under Armour founder and CEO Kevin Plank, who loaned a plane for search representatives to fly to Florida and at least one other destination, according to...
NEWS
By Steve Schmadeke, Tribune reporter | July 2, 2010
Taking cover from the gunfire against a low brick wall, Alsip police Officer Mark Miller watched dazed as brick particles sent flying by the bullets hit his face in what seemed like slow motion. Less than a minute had passed since Miller chased an armed robbery suspect outside of an Alsip Aldi store on June 26, 2007, and into a residential neighborhood near the library. Children were out riding their bikes and, down the street, playing in a Little League baseball game. He had been saved already by an Alsip woman who, on her backyard deck handing out Popsicles, shouted a warning — "He's got a gun, he's going to shoot you" — before suspect James Sevier could ambush Miller near a garage.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writer | October 13, 1992
OAKLAND, Calif. -- It came down to this. Dave Stewart simply refused to let the Toronto Blue Jays smuggle the American League pennant out of the country.They will have to win it in Canada, if they win it at all.The Oakland Athletics had been pushed to the brink of elimination in the best-of-seven American League Championship Series, but Stewart pulled them back yesterday with a stubborn complete-game performance. He gave up seven hits on the way to a 6-2 victory that sent the series back to SkyDome for a tense Game 6 tomorrow.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | July 7, 1992
You want really bad finishes? I will give you some really bad finishes. Romeo and Juliet. Very bad. No one makes it to the end in that one. The woman who answers her front door in the first five minutes of "The Terminator" -- extremely unfortunate finish for her. The Jets putting it in the Colts' faces in Super Bowl III. Ai-yi-yi. The '69 World Series? Butch and Sundance? Bambi's mother?Now those are resoundingly, remarkably bad finishes. Two excruciating one-run losses in early July, as the baseball season is reaching its halfway point -- sorry to disappoint any Chicken Littles out there -- just doesn't compare.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | April 8, 2010
The 16-year-old mother of Lamont Davis' two children was returned to his trial in handcuffs - and in tears - late Wednesday after storming out of the courthouse during a break in the middle of her testimony. Dynashaya Hall took the stand about 3 p.m. as a reluctant witness for the prosecution in Davis' trial on charges of attempted murder. He is accused of shooting Raven Wyatt, now 6, in the head last summer while firing at a teenager. Hall testified early on that a different boy she knew had confessed to being the gunman.
NEWS
December 15, 2009
- The atmosphere at the U.N. climate conference grew more tense after talks were suspended for most of Monday's session - a sign of the developing nations' deep distrust of the promises by industrial countries to cut greenhouse gas emissions. The Africa-led suspension went to the core of suspicions by poor countries that wealthier ones were trying to soften their commitments and evade penalties for missing their targets. Talks were halted most of the day, resuming only after conference president Connie Hedegaard of Denmark assured developing countries she was not trying to kill the Kyoto Protocol, the 1997 document that requires industrial nations to cut emissions and imposes penalties if they fail to do so. Kyoto makes no demands on developing countries.
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