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By Mary Johnson and Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2010
T he Anne Arundel Community Concert Association brought the Canadian Tenors, performers with wide appeal, to its first concert of 2010. Those who attended the Jan. 6 concert at Severna Park High School expecting a Pavarotti, Domingo and Carreras-like tenor group might initially have been disappointed to hear this quartet, whose repertoire was more popular than operatic. But they were probably won over by the group's program of current international hits. The Canadian Tenors are Fraser Walters, Remigio Pereira, Clifton Murray and Victor Micallef.
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FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | January 19, 2010
A half-century after his untimely death at the age of 38, celebrated tenor and movie star Mario Lanza is receiving fresh medical attention from a Baltimore doctor who takes a dim view of one of the singer's weight-loss treatments - injections of the urine of pregnant women, a controversial therapy with new followers today. Dr. Philip A. Mackowiak, vice chairman of medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and director of the Medical Care Clinical Center at the Veterans Administration Hospital downtown, teamed up with Armando Cesari, Lanza's Australia-based biographer, for an article about the singer's health issues just out in The Pharos, the journal of the medical honorary society Alpha Omega Alpha.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | November 12, 2009
Euan Morton always knew he'd been born with a voice that people wanted to listen to. But for years, he overlooked his gift, like an unwanted Christmas present buried in the back of the attic. It was only much later that Morton began to appreciate his supple tenor and the fine things it could bring him, such as a nomination for a Tony Award for creating the role of the young Boy George in the 2003 musical "Taboo." This weekend, Morton's voice is bringing him to Baltimore to headline Center Stage's new cabaret series.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | April 29, 2008
Shafts of light stream through narrow windows to form angular patterns on gray walls and ceilings. Men in black uniforms of roughly mid-20th- century vintage stand ominously in the background. It's all very film noir-ish on the stage of the Kennedy Center Opera House, an interesting look for a work that dates from 1724. If you go Tamerlano will be performed at 7 p.m. tomorrow, 7:30 p.m. Friday and four more times through May 22 at the Kennedy Center, Virginia and New Hampshire avenues, Northwest, Washington.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | March 27, 2008
From a sample of YouTube comments posted beneath one of several videos that capture tenor Stephen Costello in ardent voice: "Stephen is wonderful! Looking forward seeing his performance in Romeo et Juliette!" "Romeo? Where? If at all possible, I want to get there!" "I found it! Romeo ... Baltimore Opera ... 4 performances ... Tickets are available. I have a strong feeling that I'm going." "Yes! I'm very excited to see him! Glad you found it!" Just one little example of the buzz Costello is generating.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 4, 2007
The music season could end right now and I wouldn't complain much, because I could bask indefinitely in the afterglow of hearing Ben Heppner sing "Roses of Picardy" Sunday night. The tenor's performance of that wistful song from 1916, the third and final encore in his fabulous recital for the Shriver Hall Concert Series, sent me out into the drizzly air on a rare high. I admit I'm an easy pushover for old ballads like "Roses of Picardy," one of the most beguiling of World War I-era songs, but it takes an uncommon singer to make them sound fresh and substantive today (or to even think of performing them)
NEWS
By GARRISON KEILLOR | September 13, 2007
I saw Luciano Pavarotti sing Pagliacci at Carnegie Hall 15 years ago, and it was pretty good. The great man was a good hundred pounds over his fighting weight and he perspired heavily, but when it came time for him to stand and deliver "Vesti la giubba," he did it big, a cry from the heart with a sob in the voice that a tenor from, say, Minnesota or Iowa would find it hard to match, and the audience cried out in admiration, as it should, and stood and...
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | September 6, 2007
Luciano Pavarotti, who possessed one of the most radiant tenor voices to be heard in the past hundred years and who enjoyed a level of popularity unequaled since the legendary Enrico Caruso, died early today in his hometown of Modena, Italy. He was 71. Mr. Pavarotti was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer last year and underwent surgery in July 2006. Last month, he was admitted to a Modena hospital, reportedly with a fever. After about three weeks of tests and treatment, the singer returned to his home, where he was cared for by local doctors, according to Italian news reports.
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