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NEWS
September 1, 1996
Gerard Vincent Neale: An obituary in yesterday's editions of The Sun gave an incorrect date for a Mass of resurrection being offered for Gerard Vincent Neale, a social worker and a tenor who sang with the Baltimore Municipal Opera Company. The Mass will be offered at 11 a.m. Saturday.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 9/01/96
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NEWS
April 28, 1996
Isador Oglesby, 82, teacher and tenorIsador Oglesby, a retired city schoolteacher and tenor soloist whose rich voice on Negro spirituals thrilled Baltimore area audiences for nearly four decades, died Thursday of cancer in his St. Paul Street apartment. He was 82.Mr. Oglesby studied under many nationally and internationally known musical scholars -- including Igor Chichagov, the conductor and vocal coach for Metropolitan Opera Company star Rosa Ponselle -- and recorded three albums detailing "the Negro experience," his daughter, Jerilyn Manning, said.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine | January 15, 1993
Merely reading about great sax isn't enough; in this case, hearing really is believing. So here are 20 of the greatest soprano, alto, tenor and baritone solos ever."
NEWS
February 6, 1995
Thomas Hayward, 77, a leading tenor at the Metropolitan Opera during the 1940s and 1950s, died of kidney and heart problems Thursday at his home in Las Vegas. As a lyric tenor, he sang with the Met for 14 years and had leading roles in "La Traviata," "Rigoletto" and "Faust." He had more than 400 concert performances with major symphony orchestras in North America. He also starred in a long-running NBC radio show, "Serenade to America."Albert Elsen, 67, a Stanford University art professor and expert on sculptor Auguste Rodin, died Thursday of a heart attack in Stanford, Calif.
NEWS
August 29, 1993
Ray DeVollProminent tenorBOSTON -- Ray DeVoll, 66, a tenor who specialized in early music and chamber works, died after a heart attack Tuesday at a gymnasium. He was a frequent performer with the New York Pro Musica, singing everything from Elizabethan madrigals to music by Monteverdi and the role of the Archangel in a 13th-century Easter drama, "The Play of the Risen Christ." He also appeared in "The Play of Daniel" at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine and "The Play of Herod" at the Cloisters.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | July 2, 1992
The Young Victorian Theatre Company is presenting Gilbert and Sullivan's "Princess Ida," an operetta with a feminist theme, July 9-11 and July 16-18 in Centennial Hall at Bryn Mawr School on West Melrose Avenue. All performances begin at 8:15 p.m. Tickets are $18.50 for general admission, $17 for seniors and patrons and $12 for children. For details, call (410) 323-3077.The company, now in its 22nd season, recently received endowment grants totaling $10,000. This year's annual operating budget is $60,000.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 12, 1999
The Washington Opera's production of Ermanno Wolf-Ferrari's "Sly (or The Legend of the Sleeper Awakened)" was clearly designed to entice tenor Jose Carreras back into an American opera house.The Spanish tenor, now 52, had been absent from stages here since 1987, just before he was diagnosed with, and underwent extended treatment for, leukemia. And he wanted to sing this 1927 opera, which received its belated American premiere Wednesday evening at the Kennedy Center."Sly" is a tragic work that asks: What if a drunken, down-at-the-heels poet passes out in a tavern and then -- as a cruel joke -- is convinced that he is someone else?
NEWS
April 24, 2003
Teddy Edwards, 78, a deft and soulful saxophonist who was a mainstay of the Southern California jazz scene and played what is said to be the first recorded bebop solo on tenor saxophone, died of prostate cancer Sunday in Los Angeles. A fixture in Los Angeles jazz for more than a half-century, Mr. Edwards was relatively unknown elsewhere, although he had a following in Europe. Unlike Dexter Gordon, his friend and a fellow Los Angeles tenor saxophonist, he never felt the urge to move to New York.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 18, 1996
Massenet's "Werther" is perhaps the greatest tenor vehicle in the French operatic literature. Tenors love "Werther" because it gives them unparalleled opportunities to do what they do best: Sing all night long about how desperately in love they are and how unhappy it makes them. It is to the tenor what Shakespeare's "Hamlet" is to the actor.It is all the more remarkable, therefore, when a production of this nTC opera is dominated by the mezzo-soprano who is the hero's love interest and source of misery.
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