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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | July 13, 1993
Since "Lend Me a Tenor" -- the opera-based farce by Washington attorney Ken Ludwig -- tried out for Broadway at the Mechanic Theatre four years ago, the show has found fame and fortune not only in New York, where it garnered seven Tony nominations, but in more than 25 foreign countries.Ludwig has written the screenplay for Columbia Pictures, and the stage play has been translated into 16 languages. By now "Tenor" is fair game for community theaters (Spotlighters produced it last season) and summer stock.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | February 28, 1994
Verdi's "Un Ballo in Maschera" ("A Masked Ball") has a perfection of shape, an exuberance of spirit and a sheerly Italianate joy in beautiful singing unmatched even by the composer's other middle-period masterpieces. Rarer still among Verdi's operas is that it provides a longer, richer, more rewarding part for tenor than for baritone. The last of these reasons -- though there are others -- makes a compelling case for the Washington Opera's current production of "Ballo," unveiled Saturday at the Kennedy Center's Opera House.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | October 23, 1992
A good farce is like an intricate music box -- the type with lots of movable parts. And, Ken Ludwig's "Lend Me a Tenor" is more like a music box than most since it's about opera. To stretch this metaphor a bit further, at the Spotlighters the music box takes on the added detail of being see-through. That's because the theater's arena staging makes all of the workings visible at all times.Tricky as this may be -- and in this case both the performances and Miriam Bazensky's direction are uneven -- there's also something delightfully fitting about mounting a farce in the round.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1998
Richard B. Cassilly, a Harford County farm boy who became one of the world's acclaimed operatic tenors in a career that lasted more than 40 years, died Friday of a cerebral hemorrhage at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston. He was 70.Mr. Cassilly, who lived in the Boston suburb of Brookline, was a professor of voice at Boston University, where he had taught since 1986.His last professional appearance was in Richard Strauss' "Salome," which he performed in Puerto Rico in 1995.He was a "heldentenor," or heroic tenor, in Germany and he came by the description naturally -- 6 feet 4 inches, 250 pounds, barrel-chested, with a bearded and craggy face.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | February 6, 1992
JOHN ALER SOMETIMES feels as if he's known David Zinman all his life."Actually, we've only worked together three times and all in the last two years," the tenor says about the music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. "But I admire him no end; he conducts everything well and, unlike many conductors, he really likes working with other people."There are a lot of conductors who feel the same way about John Aler. That flexible, beautiful voice is always at the service of music (never a singer's ego)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 7, 2004
Just before the unexpectedly happy ending of Bellini's I Puritani comes the haunting Credeasi, misera. Here, the tenor portraying the condemned Cavalier hero Arturo begs his enemies to be gentle with the Puritan he had hoped to marry, the mentally fragile Elvira. As he nears the end of the piece, the singer faces two hurdles in quick succession. The first is high enough - D-flat, a notch above high C (the normal outer limit for a tenor). The second is impossibly higher, up to an F, a realm usually traversed only by coloratura sopranos.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 8, 2005
Anne Arundel Community College's Moonlight Troupers have embarked on their final week of rehearsal in preparation for next weekend's opening of Ken Ludwig's Lend Me a Tenor at the Pascal Center for Performing Arts. Ludwig's farce, filled with mistaken identities and assorted tenor groupies, opened on Broadway in March 1989. It ran there for more than a year, winning many awards including two Tonys, then ran in London, where it was nominated for the Olivier Award as comedy of the year. The show has been seen in 200-plus productions in more than 25 countries.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | September 22, 2002
Rodrick Dixon, one-third of the popular Three Mo' Tenors act, will give a recital today to benefit the W.W. Payne Community Outreach Center. Dixon has chosen an enticing program of superior art songs by Schubert, Schumann, Faure and others; opera (a duet from Verdi's Rigoletto) and sacred music (Gounod's St. Cecilia Mass); and traditional spirituals. A medley from Kern's Showboat and, for a grand finale, the Battle Hymn of the Republic will complete the concert. Joining him will be soprano Alfreda Burke, pianist Victor Simonson, the 80-voice Concert Choir of the City Temple of Baltimore (Baptist)
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 22, 2001
Depressed about the stock market? Cheer up at Bowie Playhouse, where 2nd Star Productions' spring presentation has opened - the Ken Ludwig farce, "Lend Me a Tenor." Since its 1989 debut, the comic tale of mistaken identity has been classified among the funniest of contemporary American plays. Although I enjoyed Paragon's version of "Tenor" about a year ago, this version seems almost entirely new and even more hilarious. This comedy seems to be an unending source of laughs - which 2nd Star apparently embraces, having opened with "Tenor" as its very first show in 1996 and choosing now to bring it back.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 22, 2005
A hit since it opened on Broadway in 1989, Ken Ludwig's Lend Me A Tenor continues to entertain in Anne Arundel Community College's Moonlight Troupers' production that opened last weekend at the school's Pascal Center for Performing Arts. Tenor tells the story of a world-famous Italian singer, Tito Merelli, who is engaged by Cleveland Opera to open its season with a performance of Verdi's Otello. Unconcerned about keeping 1,000 opera fans waiting, Tito decides to rest after his angry wife, Maria, threatens to leave him over his womanizing.
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