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By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 19, 2010
A half-century after his untimely death at the age of 38, celebrated tenor and movie star Mario Lanza is receiving fresh medical attention from a Baltimore doctor who takes a dim view of one of the singer's weight-loss treatments - injections of the urine of pregnant women, a controversial therapy with new followers today. Dr. Philip A. Mackowiak, vice chairman of medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and director of the Medical Care Clinical Center at the Veterans Administration Hospital downtown, teamed up with Armando Cesari, Lanza's Australia-based biographer, for an article about the singer's health issues just out in The Pharos, the journal of the medical honorary society Alpha Omega Alpha.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
UPDATE: Since I posted this story on Tuesday, word has come that the 'Toujours L'Amour' concert scheduled for Friday has been postponed because Stephen Costello has a 'bad flu.' Lyric Opera Baltimore artistic director James Harp says the event may be rescheduled for next season. Ticket-holders may exchange seats for a future performance or obtain refunds at point of purchase. Costello released a statement saying he was 'hugely looking forward to singing' and 'would like to extend my sincere apologies to everyone involved -- from the organisers and other performers, to those of you who have bought tickets in good faith.' When Stephen Costello made his Baltimore debut in 2008, he was an up-and-coming tenor.
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FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 4, 2007
The music season could end right now and I wouldn't complain much, because I could bask indefinitely in the afterglow of hearing Ben Heppner sing "Roses of Picardy" Sunday night. The tenor's performance of that wistful song from 1916, the third and final encore in his fabulous recital for the Shriver Hall Concert Series, sent me out into the drizzly air on a rare high. I admit I'm an easy pushover for old ballads like "Roses of Picardy," one of the most beguiling of World War I-era songs, but it takes an uncommon singer to make them sound fresh and substantive today (or to even think of performing them)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2014
John Weber, a tenor who sang in opera productions and was the music director of a Rodgers Forge church, died of an apparent heart attack Jan. 17. The Catonsville resident was 50. His brother, Thomas Proveaux, said Mr. Weber collapsed at the wheel of his car while driving on West Forest Park Avenue. He was taken to Sinai Hospital, where his death was confirmed. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of John Borst Weber, a Baltimore County police officer, and Eileen O'Sullivan Weber, a Western Electric worker and homemaker.
NEWS
June 29, 1993
After what was by all accounts a phenomenal performance Saturday before a crowd of 500,000 in New York's Central Park, opera superstar Luciano Pavarotti is entitled to borrow Mark Twain's legendary retort to the press: "Reports of my death have been greatly exaggerated."The Italian tenor hadn't been pronounced dead, exactly, but much of the reportage concerning him recently has strongly implied his stage career is nearing its end. For an opera singer, that's akin to having one foot in the grave.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2014
UPDATE: Since I posted this story on Tuesday, word has come that the 'Toujours L'Amour' concert scheduled for Friday has been postponed because Stephen Costello has a 'bad flu.' Lyric Opera Baltimore artistic director James Harp says the event may be rescheduled for next season. Ticket-holders may exchange seats for a future performance or obtain refunds at point of purchase. Costello released a statement saying he was 'hugely looking forward to singing' and 'would like to extend my sincere apologies to everyone involved -- from the organisers and other performers, to those of you who have bought tickets in good faith.' When Stephen Costello made his Baltimore debut in 2008, he was an up-and-coming tenor.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2011
The Pasadena Theatre Company returns to the Chesapeake Arts Center Studio 194 Theatre to present Ken Ludwig's 1989 Tony Award-winning comedy "Lend Me a Tenor," which opens on Saturday, June 4, for a three-weekend run. This return to Chesapeake Arts Center might be termed a kind of homecoming. During its 32-year history, the Pasadena Theatre Company has performed at several county venues, recently most often at AACC's Pascal Center and Humanities Recital Hall. At a recent rehearsal, PTC President Sharon Steele said, "We are pleased to be back … with our current show and we know 'Lend Me a Tenor' will be a great fit here, where we also hope to do lots of shows.
NEWS
By WILLIAM McCLOSKEY | April 19, 1996
A RARE convergence of tenors is turning the closing days of the Metropolitan Opera's 1995-96 season, which ends next weekend, into a frenzy of ticket seeking.The world's two leading active tenors, Luciano Pavarotti and Placido Domingo, have undertaken new roles as, respectively, the title role in ''Andrea Chenier'' and Siegmund in ''Die Walkuere.'' (Jose Carreras, the other of the ''Three Tenors,'' hasn't sung at the Met for years, and little elsewhere except on special occasions, since recovering from leukemia.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | November 22, 1993
Tenors are a passionate breed; many would kill to have a voice with a top like Chris Merritt's.Yesterday afternoon in Shriver Hall when Merritt sang Tonio's first act aria -- the one with no less than eight high C's -- from Donizetti's "Daughter of the Regiment," the tenor nailed those high notes with brilliance, charm and ease. All the more remarkable was that this was the singer's s fourth encore after a long and difficult program of operatic arias in a benefit for the Baltimore Opera Company.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special To The Sun | September 16, 1994
Most theatrical farces these days seem to involve staid British vicars cavorting in their underwear amid countless cases of mistaken identity. Ugh.But when "Il Stupendo," Italy's greatest tenor, came to Cleveland Sept. 9 to sing Verdi's "Otello," and in the process created more mayhem, infidelity and, yes, cases of mistaken identity than you could believe, I laughed as much as anyone in the theater.That's because "Lend Me a Tenor," the Ken Ludwig play currently in production at the Colonial Players of Annapolis, is a witty, hilarious farce that goes well beyond formulaic nonsense to garner its belly laughs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2013
In case you pay attention to liturgical calendars, or in case you don't, Nov. 2 is All Souls' Days in Catholic tradition. That's reason enough for me to share one of my favorite art songs -- "Allerseelen" ("All Souls' Day") by Richard Strauss. That guy sure could write 'em. This vintage, gorgeous performance by tenor Rudolf Schock should please all souls. Needless to say, the song isn't about the actual fesast day, but about love. Here's a loose translation of the poem by Hermann von Gilm zu Roseneg: Put the fragrant reseda on the table.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
Community Concerts at Second, which offers a remarkable range of free and substantial programs each year, drew a big house for the opening of its 27th season Sunday afternoon showcasing the Aspen String Trio, plus one. On the first half of the bill, the Aspen players delivered a finely articulated, expressively shaped account of Beethoven's String Trio in D major, Op. 9, No. 2.  The dark lyricism of the Andante, which gives a hint of where the...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
Albert Hall, a professional opera singer and choirmaster who began his singing career during his student days at City College, died May 13 from colon cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Towson resident was 89. The son of a plumber and a homemaker, Albert Hall was born in Baltimore and raised on Rose Street. It was while he was attending City College in the late 1930s that he came to the attention of Blanche F. Bowlsbey, the legendary music teacher whom her students fondly called "Mrs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
The opera world has been giving a little extra attention to a couple of giants born in 1813, Giuseppe Verdi and Richard Wagner. Locally, that bicentennial salute has included memorable concerts by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra featuring excerpts from Wagner's mountainous operas. And this week, Lyric Opera Baltimore offers a production of one of Verdi's earliest masterworks for the stage, "Rigoletto. " The "Rigoletto" staging brings tenor Bryan Hymel back to town after his Lyric debut last season, when he made a formidable impression in Gounod's "Faust.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2011
COLLEGE PARK - Who would have imagined that this - an early-season game against an America East foe during a sleepy holiday-season week - could turn into an event? But the fans at Maryland's 83-72 victory over Albany clearly felt they were seeing something special as 7-footer Alex Len made his regular-season debut by hitting his first five shots - four of them dunks - en route to a 14-point, eight-rebound performance. Even with Len on the floor, Maryland (8-3) lost an early 13-point lead and had to hold on at the end. But, at worst, the game marked the fans' introduction to an intriguing - if raw - big man. Len, who has been practicing with the team and was a surprise starter Wednesday night, missed the first 10 games of the season as a penalty for having previously signed with a club overseas.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2011
The Pasadena Theatre Company returns to the Chesapeake Arts Center Studio 194 Theatre to present Ken Ludwig's 1989 Tony Award-winning comedy "Lend Me a Tenor," which opens on Saturday, June 4, for a three-weekend run. This return to Chesapeake Arts Center might be termed a kind of homecoming. During its 32-year history, the Pasadena Theatre Company has performed at several county venues, recently most often at AACC's Pascal Center and Humanities Recital Hall. At a recent rehearsal, PTC President Sharon Steele said, "We are pleased to be back … with our current show and we know 'Lend Me a Tenor' will be a great fit here, where we also hope to do lots of shows.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1998
Richard B. Cassilly, a Harford County farm boy who became one of the world's acclaimed operatic tenors in a career that lasted more than 40 years, died Friday of a cerebral hemorrhage at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston. He was 70.Mr. Cassilly, who lived in the Boston suburb of Brookline, was a professor of voice at Boston University, where he had taught since 1986.His last professional appearance was in Richard Strauss' "Salome," which he performed in Puerto Rico in 1995.He was a "heldentenor," or heroic tenor, in Germany and he came by the description naturally -- 6 feet 4 inches, 250 pounds, barrel-chested, with a bearded and craggy face.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | July 13, 1993
Since "Lend Me a Tenor" -- the opera-based farce by Washington attorney Ken Ludwig -- tried out for Broadway at the Mechanic Theatre four years ago, the show has found fame and fortune not only in New York, where it garnered seven Tony nominations, but in more than 25 foreign countries.Ludwig has written the screenplay for Columbia Pictures, and the stage play has been translated into 16 languages. By now "Tenor" is fair game for community theaters (Spotlighters produced it last season) and summer stock.
EXPLORE
By Leslie Bauer | May 26, 2011
St. Andrew's Church will hold its monthly Community Feast tonight, May 26, from 6 to 8 p.m. This month's menu will be Italian. Proceeds from this dinner will go toward the Alabama tornado relief effort. The meal is donated by Smokin' Hot Catering, and takes place at the church, located at 2892 Route 97, in Glenwood, between the post office and Union Chapel Road. The whole community is welcome to come, so take the night off from cooking! Dine-in or carry-out is available.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2011
Placido Domingo, as usual, is in full multitask mode as he wraps up his 15-year tenure as general director of Washington National Opera. The famed Spanish tenor has seven more performances to sing as Oreste in the company's first-ever production of Gluck's "Iphigenie en Tauride," which opened last Friday. He'll also switch gears to conduct five performances of Donizetti's "Don Pasquale," which opens this Friday. At 70, Domingo could be pursuing an enviable, pampered life of leisure, but that's a thoroughly alien concept to him. Besides, he gives every indication of thriving on packed schedules like the one he has this month in Washington.
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